Five College Archives and Manuscript Collections
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Tiyo Attallah Salah-El Papers, 1890-2006
15 boxes (7.5 linear ft.)
Collection number: MS 590

Abstract:
While serving a life sentence in a Pennsylvania prison, Tiyo Attallah Salah-El transformed himself into an activist, scholar, and advocate for the abolition of prisons. An accomplished jazz musician, Salah-El has distinguished himself for educational and scholarly work, his musical career, his close relationship with activists and educators, and for the non-profit organization he founded, The Coalition for the Abolition of Prisons (CAP).

The Papers of Tiyo Attallah Salah-El document his experience in the State Correctional Institution in Dallas, Pennsylvania from 1977 to the present, providing information on his education, teaching, and activism. The bulk of the collection consists of his extensive correspondence with educators, musicians, and activists. Other highlights include a manuscript copy of his autobiography and the founding documents of the The Coalition for the Abolition of Prisons.

Terms of Access and Use:

The collection is open for research.

Special Collections and University Archives, W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Historical Note
Tiyo Attallah Salah-El playing the saxophone in high school.

Tiyo Attallah Salah-El playing the saxophone in high school.

While serving a life sentence in a Pennsylvania prison, Tiyo Attallah Salah-El transformed himself into an activist, scholar, and advocate for the abolition of prisons. An accomplished jazz musician, Salah-El has distinguished himself for educational and scholarly work, his musical career, his close relationship with activists and educators, and for the non-profit organization he founded, The Coalition for the Abolition of Prisons (CAP).

Born David Riley Jones on Sept. 13, 1932 in West Chester, Pennsylvania, Salah-El was the third of four children born to Riley and Ella Jones, the only black homeowners in the Red Lion district of West Chester. The Joneses were a solidly middle class family. Ella worked as a nurse, while Riley owned a successful plumbing business. Salah-El and his older siblings Earnest and Bette and younger sister Hazel all attended integrated schools. A talented athlete, playing both varsity baseball and football, Salah-El was one of only two blacks to graduate from the high school.

After graduation in 1950, Salah-El enlisted in the Army and served as a tank operator during the Korean War, earning a purple heart for wounds received in battle in 1953. After the war, he returned to West Chester to work for his father, and he began playing tenor saxophone in R&B clubs throughout southeastern Pennsylvania. After Salah-El married, he attempted for several years to juggle a musical career with his family life and work as a plumber, but the tension between his family responsibilities and the lure of clubs and women proved especially difficult to navigate. Things came to a head in 1956 when Salah-El's wife left him and took their young son to live with another man. A violent confrontation followed, and in the scuffle, Salah-El shot his wife's lover in the arm. Things deteriorated further still when the police arrived and Salah-El accidentally shot an officer in the hand.

Convicted of aggravated assault, Salah-El was sentenced to 6 to 12 years in Graterford Prison, the largest penitentiary in Pennsylvania and the successor to the infamous Cherry Hill Penitentiary. In Graterford, he continued to pursue his interest in music, learning how to read music, joining the prison band, and getting involved more generally with the community of jazz musicians there. Through Graterford, he first met Robert "Bootsie" Barnes who was to become a life-long friend and frequent correspondent. Practicing intensively, sitting-in with the bands, and listening to the jazz show on WRTI radio, Salah-El honed his talents on the tenor saxophone.

After serving a six-year sentence, Salah-El was paroled in 1962 and returned home to work for his brother Earnest's construction company, though music was still in his blood. He began playing regularly with Len Foster's jazz band based in nearby Wilmington, Delaware, but as the band gained local recognition, he got swept up in the raucous nightlife. Similar to his experiences balancing a middle-class family life and the nightlife in the R&B circuit, Salah-El struggled to balance his love of serious music with the excitement of nightlife and women. Feeling trapped by a relationship with a pregnant girlfriend, he left Pennsylvania for Washington D.C. at the invitation of a friend and joined the Blackman's Development Center, an African American self-help organization run by the Moorish Science Temple of America. Working as an administrative assistant, spokesman, and community organizer for the Center's drug prevention and rehabilitation program, he converted to Islam, changed his name from David Jones to Tiyo Attallah Salah-El and became an active member of the Moorish Science Temple.

Jazz remained a constant. Through the clubs he frequented in Washington, Salah-El became acquainted with the city's underworld and got drawn into the drug culture that permeated the jazz scene. Over time, however, it became impossible to maintain this double life, engaging in drug use by night and advocating for drug prevention in the African American community by day. The physical and moral toll eventually forced Salah-El to retreat from the city and return to Media to live with his sister Bette.

Relocating to Media, though, did not resolve the underlying issues. In 1969, Salah-El and some of his friends began selling hashish and marijuana, and as their business grew, it propelled him into working for an organized crime syndicate based in Wilmington. This phase of his life came to an abrupt end in 1975 soon after his nephew, Ray Betz, approached Salah-El seeking employment and lodging. Salah-El found him work with the crime syndicate not knowing that Betz was working as an FBI informant. On July 31, 1975, Salah-El was arrested and charged with selling drugs and murder. The details of the crime are not entirely clear. Salah-El writes about the days leading up his arrest in autobiography. Discovering that he might be a target of the very organized crime syndicate in which he was employed, Salah-El decided to leave town. Checking in with his sister Bette a few days later, he learned that the police were looking for him and that a girlfriend had been found dead in her apartment. Whatever else may have happened, Salah-El was convicted of selling drugs by an all-white jury, many of whom had ties to law enforcement, and was sentenced to two years in prison.

While awaiting trial at the Delaware County Prison, Salah-El was hired to teach music to his fellow prisoners. At the same time, he happened to read about the riots at Attica State Prison and about post-Attica attempts to organize labor unions among prisoners. Inspired by the idea of prisoner rehabilitation through self-government, Salah-El began to work with civil attorney Richard Fishman to appeal to the Delaware County Prison Board and the Teamsters Local to form a prisoner's union, but his organizing efforts, exacerbated by his high pay as a music teacher, angered the guards and his cell was entered and his papers were scattered. Things went downhill from there. In 1977, the County Prison Board ruled against the union and Salah-El was convicted of murder and sentenced to life without parole. Attica, Salah-El writes, combined with the clear message sent by the Prison Board and guards that he had crossed a line, began his politicization.

After his conviction, Salah-El was transferred to the State Correctional Institute at Dallas, where he has remained ever since. By the end of 1978, he began work on a self-directed bachelor's degree in African American history through the Prisoner Education Project, hosted by Franconia College (later Beacon College) and run by Montgomery (Monty) Neill. Although Salah-El's work and materials were often destroyed by guards, he completed his degree and immediately began studying for a masters in political science while working as a Beacon College program advisor, helping Bachelor's students determine their self-directed course of study. After he earned his Master's in 1983, he was promoted to director of the Prisoner Education Project. Through his education, Salah-El gained confidence and political conviction, which aided him in taking effective legal action against the Delaware County Prison for the destruction of his materials relating to union organizing. He was awarded an out-of-court settlement.

Salah-El also began to form strong bonds with scholars and activists outside the prison. His contact with the Gay Community News, which had a prisoner pen-pal program, introduced him to gay rights activists and he became outspoken supporter of their struggle, a truly courageous stance in the homophobic culture of prisons. His relationship with Monty Neill and Howard Zinn, who Salah-El met in 1984, guided his political development, but more importantly, these relationships formed the backbone of what became a diverse and passionate network of advocates who have provided Salah-El with essential support. Salah-El's education also stimulated his musical creativity and in the early 1980s he composed a jazz suite that was recorded live at SCI-Dallas by a group of musicians assembled by the DJ Jay Dugan.

In the late 1980s, Salah-El became familiar with the Religious Society of Friends through their work in criminal justice reform and he contacted members of the North Branch Meeting in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. After studying the Quaker religion and becoming close friends with members of the North Branch Meeting, Salah-El became a member of the Religious Society of Friends in 1993 and was granted approval by the warden to host Quaker meetings at the prison.

Salah-El's experience as a prisoner and his education and political awareness forced him to a deep reflection on the state of the prison system in the United States. Through the study of African American history and political philosophy, Salah-El determined that the foundational philosophy on which the criminal justice system is based is inherently flawed, and rather than deterring crime actually fosters a cycle of crime and incarceration. According to his analysis, the most effective recourse is the abolition of prisons. Salah-El joined an international movement calling for prison abolition and began an unprecedented mission to advocate for prison abolition from within the walls of a prison itself. To that end, Salah-El founded the Coalition for the Abolition of Prisons (CAP) in 1995. CAP grew over a number of years, and although it is no longer active, the network of scholars that made up the coalition is still very involved with Salah-El's work and the furtherance of his mission.

Salah El continues to write and teach. Most recently, he has organized an underground pre-GED training course for prisoners, many of whom depend on passing the GED to be considered for parole. His courses have grown from twenty students per year to over 100 and many of his graduates have taken their place teaching other prisoners.

Scope and Contents of the Collection
Tiyo Attallah Salah-El, 1997.

Tiyo Attallah Salah-El, 1997.

The Papers of Tiyo Attallah Salah-El document his experience in the State Correctional Institution in Dallas, Pennsylvania from 1977 to the present, providing information on his education, teaching, and activism. The collection includes letters, postings from the prison administration, inter-prison memos, legal documents detailing his civil action against the Delaware County Prison, clippings, fliers, articles, sheet music, manuscripts of Salah-El's autobiography and musical compositions, and photographs of his family and friends.

The bulk of the collection consists of Salah-El's correspondence with an impressive array of figures from author and historian Howard Zinn to Hollywood talent agent Paul Alan Smith and from university faculty Hal Pepinsky and Mechthild Nagel to prison activists Elizabeth Dede and Lois Ahrens. Letters address Salah-El's major concerns, namely prison abolition, education, and music. Materials that document his work with the prison abolish movement include the founding documents of the Coalition for the Abolition of Prisons (CAP) and the group's newsletter, Broken Chains, as well as numerous articles both by Salah-El and others reflecting research in the field.


Information on Use
Terms of Access and Use
Restrictions on access:

The collection is open for research.

Preferred Citation

Cite as: Tiyo Attallah Salah-El Papers (MS 590). Special Collections and University Archives, W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst.

History of the Collection

Acquired from Tiyo Attallah Salah-El in 2006-2008.

Processing Information

Processed by Aaron Rubinstein, 2008.


Additional Information
Contact Information
Special Collections and University Archives
W.E.B. Du Bois Library
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Amherst, MA 01003-9275

Phone: (413) 545-2780
Fax: (413) 577-1399
Link to SCUA
Language
English

Series Descriptions
1978-2006


Salah-El's correspondence spans twenty-eight years of incarceration and chronicles his relationships with activists and scholars, Lois Ahrens, Mechthild Nagel, Elizabeth Dede, Montgomery Neill, Ann-Britt Sternfeldt, Howard Zinn, and musicians George W. Harvey and Robert "Bootsie" Barnes, among others. With letter writing his primary method for sustaining personal relationships and maintaining contact with the outside world, Salah-El keeps in almost constant touch with his network of friends and supporters. In addition to writing and receiving letters on a regular basis, Salah-El frequently forwards the letters he receives to other friends in his circle fostering new relationships and renewing old contacts. As a result, many letters written by one individual are later annotated by Salah-El and sent on to another correspondent. This practice of annotating and forwarding letters complicates the arrangement of the correspondence in the collection, but emphasizes the multiple connections within Salah-El's world. As a general rule, letters are filed under the name of the last person to receive the document, which takes into account both Salah-El's intention to include that person in the communication as well as the comments he specifically addresses to that individual.

Despite his surroundings, Salah-El's letters are overwhelming positive in tone; he is optimistic and unfailing grateful for the support he receives from friends. Since the bulk of the letters within the collection were written more than two decades after his incarceration, his letters do not by and large discuss the crimes for which he was convicted. A complete account of his earlier life and introduction into prison activism can be found in his autobiography filed in series 3. What Salah-El does discuss are those issues which are most near and dear to his heart: life-long learning, music, Quakerism, and of course prison abolition. Salah-El also relays some details about his life in prison, including prison conditions, rules and regulations, and overall treatment of inmates. While many of these details are highlighted because of their negative impact on his life and the lives of his fellow prisoners, Salah-El consistently meets these challenges with a positive outlook--an outlook he has perfected in response to years of frustration and anger aimed at the prison system.

As a prison abolitionist communicating from within the walls of prison, Salah-El's letters offer a unique perspective on the existing prison system. He observes firsthand how the correctional system in the U.S. fails on two levels: first, it fails the inmates who are not exposed to the reform and education programs necessary to transition from prison back into their communities upon release and second, it fails society as the financial underwriter of a large and expensive prison system that neither reforms nor re-trains prisoners ensuring that the cycle of crime and incarceration is repeated by the same offenders. Salah-El's letters with prison activists and educators offer research and statistical data supporting their assessment of the judicial system as well accounts and evidence from within the system itself.

1976-2006


This series is made up of records documenting Salah-El's activities while incarcerated, detailing his battles with prison bureaucracy. Among these are memos and administrative documents regarding policy changes in prison, documents relating to Salah-El's litigation with the Delaware County Prison, and legal reference documents assembled by Salah-El for the use of other prisoners. A prison activist for more two decades, this series also contains materials relating to Salah-El's efforts to abolish the very prisons he sees as having failed both the prisoners and society.

Out of the materials documenting the prison abolition movement, the most important are those relating to the Coalition for the Abolition of Prisons (CAP). Founded in 1995 by Salah-El, CAP was established to introduce positive transformation to the criminal justice system with a focus on abolishing prisons. Soon after CAP was established the group began producing a newsletter, which Salah-El contributed to and edited. In these newsletters, Salah-El and other contributors examine the existing prison system and seek alternatives to traditional justice. The conclusion drawn in these articles--that prison abolition is the only answer to the problem--is certainly controversial, however, Salah-El and others believe that the system is too corrupt to be saved. While this conclusion may seem radical, Salah-El asserts the opposite: "The least controversial observation that one can make about American criminal justice today is that it is remarkably ineffective, absurdly expensive, grossly inhumane, and riddled with ruthlessness and racism." His efforts are aimed at convincing the public, both frightened by and suspicious of the idea, that the existing prison system neither reforms its inmates nor protects their communities from future crime.

1994-2006


This series contains newspaper clippings, printed articles, brochures, fliers, posters, form letters, journals, and pamphlets that Salah-El collected or sent to his correspondents while in prison. Manuscripts feature writings by Salah-El and other activists. Also included are sheet music collected by Salah-El, sheet music used for musical instruction in prison, and sheet music composed by Salah-El himself.

Of singular importance is Salah-El's manuscript of his autobiography. It is the only place within the collection where his full history is documented from childhood to young adulthood and his first incarceration to his later involvement in the drug underworld and organized crime and his second incarceration. The fact that the story is told by Salah-El himself makes it even more valuable in understanding how he became a prisoner and what he did subsequently to change his life through education, Quakerism, and prison activism.

1890-2006


As much as his letters connect Salah-El to the intellectual and emotional aspects of the outside world, the photographs he collects connect him to the physical world he was removed from three decades ago. Every photograph sent to him over the years Salah-El has treated as a treasured object, not just because they offer him a view of the outside world, but because they are physical depictions of the people he has corresponded with for years at a time, many of whom he has never met in person. Most of the images, ranging from snapshots of friends and their families to interior views, vacations, and pets, are not extraordinary when taken on their own. What makes them extraordinary is the value Salah-El places on them and the intent of the photographer to share a piece of his or her world with him. Other photographs depict Salah-El's early childhood and family.

Contents List
Series 1. Correspondence
1978-2006


Ahrens, Lois
2005 Apr-Oct

Box 1
Ahrens, Lois
2005 Nov-2006 Mar

Box 1
Ahrens, Lois
2006 Apr-July

Box 1
Ahrens, Lois
2006 Aug-Nov

Box 1
Arthur, Erika
2006

Box 1
Ahrens, Lois
2007

Box 1
Ahrens, Lois
2007

Box 1
Barnes, Robert (Bootsie)
1994-2006

Box 1
Barnes, Robert (Bootsie)
1994-2006

Box 1
Beacon College
1981-1991

Box 1
Benham, Jill
2002

Box 1
Bushnell, Prudence
1998

Box 1
Caffentzis, George
1996

Box 1
Charles Bannerman Memorial Fellowship Program
1994

Box 1
Cohen-Joppa, Jack
2006

Box 1
Condron,Betty
1998

Box 1
Cox, Robert S.
2006

Box 1
Cremation Society of Pennsylvania
1997-2000

Box 1
Davidson, Howard
1992, 1996

Box 1
Davis-Putter Scholarship Fund
1988-2003

Box 1
Dearborne, Carrie
1992-2006

Box 1
Dede, Elizabeth
2001

Box 1
Dede, Elizabeth
2002

Box 1
Dede, Elizabeth
2002

Box 1
Dede, Elizabeth
2002

Box 2
Dede, Elizabeth
2002

Box 2
Dede, Elizabeth
2003

Box 2
Dede, Elizabeth
2003

Box 2
Dede, Elizabeth
2003

Box 2
Dede, Elizabeth
2003

Box 2
Dede, Elizabeth
2004

Box 2
Dede, Elizabeth
2004

Box 2
Dede, Elizabeth
2004

Box 2
Dede, Elizabeth
2004

Box 2
Dede, Elizabeth
2004

Box 2
Dede, Elizabeth
2004

Box 2
Dede, Elizabeth
2004

Box 2
Dede, Elizabeth
2005

Box 2
Dede, Elizabeth
2005

Box 2
Dede, Elizabeth
2005

Box 2
Dede, Elizabeth
2006

Box 2
Dede, Elizabeth
2006

Box 3
Dede, Elizabeth
2007

Box 3
Dede, Elizabeth
2007

Box 3
Diane
1988

Box 3
Envelopes
19902-2006

Box 3
Foltz, Audrey
1993

Box 3
Hartnett, Stephen
2001-2002

Box 3
Harvey, George W.
2002-2006

Box 3
Harvey, George W.
undated

Box 3
Incarcerated Veterans' Assistance Organization (IVAO)
1978

Box 3
Iranzad, Ruth (Lady Ruth)
1986-1987

Box 3
James, Joy
2002

Box 3
Keller, Jane
2001-2002

Box 3
Lenson, David
2006

Box 3
Love, Angus
2002-2003

Box 3
Merrill, Susan
1991

Box 3
Morris, Walter B.
2006

Box 3
Nagel, Mechthild
1999

Box 3
Nagel, Mechthild
1999

Box 3
Nagel, Mechthild
2000

Box 3
Nagel, Mechthild
2000

Box 3
Nagel, Mechthild
2000

Box 3
Nagel, Mechthild
2000

Box 3
Nagel, Mechthild
2000

Box 3
Nagel, Mechthild
2000

Box 3
Nagel, Mechthild
2000

Box 4
Nagel, Mechthild
2000

Box 4
Nagel, Mechthild
2001

Box 4
Nagel, Mechthild
2001

Box 4
Nagel, Mechthild
2001

Box 4
Nagel, Mechthild
2001

Box 4
Nagel, Mechthild
2001

Box 4
Nagel, Mechthild
2002

Box 4
Nagel, Mechthild
2002

Box 4
Nagel, Mechthild
2002

Box 4
Nagel, Mechthild
2003

Box 4
Nagel, Mechthild
2003

Box 4
Nagel, Mechthild
2005

Box 2
Nagel, Mechthild
2006, undated

Box 4
Neill, Montgomery (Monty)
1988-2006

Box 4
Neill, Montgomery (Monty)
undated

Box 4
Norris, Sarah
undated

Box 4
North American College
1988

Box 4
Oliver, Steve
1987, 2006

Box 4
Partyka, E. Perry
2003

Box 4
Pavelitz, Walt
2002-2005

Box 4
Pepinsky, Hal
1994, 2002

Box 4
Perkins, Bob
2003-2004

Box 4
Preate, Ernie
2000

Box 4
Quigley, Elizabeth
1991-2001

Box 4
Riegle, Mike
1990

Box 4
Ryan, Joe
1984-1991, 2006

Box 5
Shabazz, Rashad
2000

Box 5
Smith, Paul Alan (Pablo)
2004

Box 5
Smith, Paul Alan (Pablo)
2005

Box 5
Smith, Paul Alan (Pablo)
2005

Box 5
Smith, Paul Alan (Pablo)
2005

Box 5
Smith, Paul Alan (Pablo)
2005

Box 5
Smith, Paul Alan (Pablo)
2006

Box 5
Stachelek, Thomas
2006

Box 5
Sternfeldt, Ann-Britt
1999-2001

Box 5
Sternfeldt, Ann-Britt
2005-2007

Box 5
Sternfeldt, Ann-Britt
2002-2006

Box 5
Sternfeldt, Ann-Britt
2000-2006

Box 5
Unidentified
1987-2000

Box 5
Veterans Administration
1977-1979, 2000

Box 5
Williams, Beverly & Wallace
1994-2006

Box 5
Zanko, Bobby
1992

Box 5
Zinn, Howard
1982-2002

Box 5
Series 2. Prison
1976-2006


Administrative
1990-2006

Box 6
Clemency Project of Upper Susquehanna Quarter
2004

Box 6
Coalition for the Abolition of Prisons (CAP): Administrative
1990-2006

Box 6
Coalition for the Abolition of Prisons (CAP): Correspondence
1997, 2000-2005

Box 6
Coalition for the Abolition of Prisons (CAP): Fundraising
1993-2001

Box 6
Coalition for the Abolition of Prisons (CAP): Newsletter
1993-2001

Box 6
Coalition for the Abolition of Prisons (CAP): Newsletter Submissions
1995-2005

Box 6
Department of Corrections, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Inmate Handbook
1998

Box 6
Education: Beacon College
1988-1990

Box 6
Education: Luzerne County Community College
1978

Box 6
Education: Music Instruction
1975-2003

Box 6
Legal: ASCAP Agreement
1987

Box 3
Legal Briefs
2005

Box 6
Legal: General
1976-2006

Box 6
Legal: Name Change
1975

Box 6
Legal: Salah v Frey
1976-1980

Box 6
Religious Society of Friends: Meritorious Lifer's Seminar
2000-2001

Box 6
Religious Society of Friends: North Branch Meeting
1991-2001

Box 6
Religious Society of Friends: Pennsylvania Prison Society
2004-2006

Box 6
Religious Society of Friends: Wider Quaker Fellowship
2004-2006

Box 6
Series 3. Published Materials and Writings
1994-2006


Articles
1987-2006

Box 6
Articles
1987-2006

Box 6
Articles
1987-2006

Box 6
Articles
1987-2006

Box 6
Articles: Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah
1986-2001

Box 7
Biographical Materials
1987-2004

Box 7
Biographical Materials: Military Service
1979-2004

Box 7
Brochures, Fliers, Posters: Barnes, Robert (Bootsie)
2002-2006

Box 7
Brochures, Fliers, Posters General
1979-2005

Box 7
Brochures, Fliers, Posters: Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah
2001-2002

Box 7
Certificates
1994-2004

Box 7
Clippings: Barnes, Robert (Bootsie)
1986-2006

Box 7
Clippings: Criminal Justice, Prison System
1990-2006

Box 7
Clippings: Criminal Justice, Prison System
1990-2006

Box 7
Clippings: General
1986-2006

Box 7
Clippings: General
1986-2006

Box 7
Clippings: Harvey, George W.
1999-2006

Box 7
Clippings: Iranzad, Ruth (Lady Ruth)
1982-1985

Box 7
Clippings: Music
1988-2006

Box 7
Clippings: Music
1988-2006

Box 7
Clippings: Music
1988-2006

Box 7
Clippings: Religious Society of Friends
1999-2003

Box 7
Clippings: Zankel, Bobby
1994

Box 7
Conal, Robbie, Artburn
1994

Box OS

With a preface by Howard Zinn.

Form Letters
2001-2006

Box 7
Manuscripts: Caffentzis, George
2006

Box 7
Manuscripts: Davidson, Howard
ca. 1998

Box 7
Manuscripts: Nagel, Mechthlid
2005

Box 7
Manuscripts: Neill, Montgomery
2004

Box 7
Manuscripts: Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah
1988

Box 7

Post-Conviction Self Help Manual for Prisoners in the State of Pennsylvania

Manuscripts: Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah
1988

Box 7

Post-Conviction Self Help Manual for Prisoners in the State of Pennsylvania

Manuscripts: Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah
ca. 1995

Box 8
Manuscripts: Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah
2003-2006

Box 8
Manuscripts: Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah
1999-2006

Box 8

Autobiography, synopsis and notes.

Manuscripts: Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah
2005

Box 8

Autobiography, part I.

Manuscripts: Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah
2005

Box 8

Autobiography, part II.

Manuscripts: Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah
1998

Box 8

Autobiography, draft, part I.

Manuscripts: Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah
1998

Box 8

Music.

Pamphlets
1989-1995

Box 8
Pamphlets
1998-2004

Box 8
Pennsylvania Justice Fellowship Task Force, The Plan for Restoring Justice
1996

Box 8
Periodicals
1993-1997

Box 9
Periodicals
2005-2006

Box 9
Periodicals
2005-2006

Box 9
Periodicals: Cobbler
2000

Box OS

Contains a letter to the editor and an article by Tiyo Attalla Salah-el.

Periodicals: Freedomways
2006

Box 9
Periodicals: Graterfriends
2006

Box 9
Periodicals: Jazz
1993-2005

Box 9
Periodicals: Prison Legal News
2006

Box 9
Periodicals: Processed World
2005

Box 9

With a note in Tiyo's hand on the inside front cover.

Periodicals:Washington Spectator
2005-2006

Box 9
Prison Law Project, A Manual on Habeas Corpus for Jail and Prison Inmates
1973

Box 9
Prison Research Education Action Project, Instead of Prisons: A Handbook for Abolitionists
1976

Box 9
Sheet Music: General
various dates

Box 9
Sheet Music: General
1915-1920

Box OS
Sheet Music
various dates

Box 9
Sheet Music: Songs 1-139
various dates

Box 9
Sheet Music: Songs 140-260
various dates

Box 10
Sheet Music: Zankel, Bobby
various dates

Box 10
Series 4. Photographs and Scrapbooks
1890-2006


Photographs: Barnes, Robert (Bootsie)
ca. 1985-1995

Box 11
Photographs: Barnes, Robert (Bootsie)
1990-2001

Box 11
Photographs: Barnes, Robert (Bootsie)
1990-2001

Box 11
Photographs: Barnes, Robert (Bootsie)
2003-2006

Box 10
Photographs: Diane
1980-1989

Box 10
Photographs: Diane
1980-1989

Box 10
Photographs: General
ca. 1990

Box 10
Photographs: General
ca. 1988-2000

Box 12

Photograph album contains photographs of Diane and Mecke Nagel.

Photographs: General
1999-2001

Box 12

Photograph album contains photographs of Bev and Wally, Ann-Britt Sternfeldt, Elizabeth Quigley, Jan Phillips; cards from Quakers and Monty Neill.

Photographs: Iranzad, Ruth
1982-1987

Box 10
Photographs: Iranzad, Ruth
1982-1987

Box 10
Photographs: Lee, Bette J.
1993

Box 12

Includes images of Bette's family.

Photographs: Lee, Bette J.
1995-2006

Box 11
Photographs: Neill, Monty
ca. 1998-2005

Box 13
Photographs: Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah
ca. 1890-1991

Box 10

Family photograph album.

Photographs: Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah
1977-1996

Box 10
Photographs: Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah
1992-2002

Box 10
Photographs: Smith, Paul Alan (Pablo)
2005

Box 13
Photographs: Sternfeldt, Ann-Britt
ca. 2004

Box 10
Photographs: Sternfeldt, Ann-Britt
ca. 2004

Box 10
Photographs: Sternfeldt, Ann-Britt
2004-2005

Box 10
Photographs: Sternfeldt, Ann-Britt
2005

Box 10

Trip to Bali.

Scrapbooks: Barnes, Robert (Bootsie)
1985-1999

Box 13

Includes newspaper clippings, photographs, performance fliers.

Scrapbooks: General
1993-2002

Box 13

Cards and postcards.

Scrapbooks: General
2001-2002

Box 11

Chiefly greeting cards with a few photographs and letters.

Scrapbooks: Jazz
ca. 1980

Box 12

Consists of loose images of jazz musicians most likely from a dismantled scrapbook.


Search Terms
The following terms represent persons, organizations, and topics documented in this collection. Use these headings to search for additional materials on this web site, in the Five College Library Catalog, or in other library catalogs and databases.

Subjects
  • Criminal justice, Administration of.
  • Jazz musicians.
  • Prisoners--United States.
  • Prisons--United States.
  • Quakers.
  • Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah.

Contributors
  • Zinn, Howard, 1922-
  • Ahrens, Lois.
  • Nagel, Mechthild.
  • Neill, Montgomery.

Genre terms
  • Photographs.
  • Scrapbooks.
  • Sheet music.


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