Five College Archives and Manuscript Collections
Home >> Sophia Smith Collection >> Inventory to the Records of the Equal Rights Amendment Campaign Archives Project (ERACAP) (1970-1985)
Smith College seal
Equal Rights Amendment Campaign Archives Project (ERACAP) Records, 1970-1985
46 boxes (29.75 linear ft.)
Collection number: MS 310

Abstract:
Documentation program. The Equal Rights Amendment Campaign Archives Project Records include correspondence, speeches, legal documents, photographs, press releases, reports, articles, interview transcripts, audio and video tapes, legislative records, logbooks, notes, documentary footage, and memorabilia. The bulk of the records comprise audiovisual materials from two documentaries: "Who Will Protect the Family," Victoria Costello's PBS documentary based on the 1982 North Carolina ERA campaign; and "Fighting for the Obvious" based on the Chicago, Illinois, ERA campaign produced by Virago Video, and ERACAP. There is also considerable material relating to the National Organization for Women's work to pass the Equal Rights Amendment. Additional ERA-related materials collected by Beth Leopold are included. Notable individuals included in the documentary footage are: Susan Cantinia, Dennis Cuddy, Donald Deuster, Frances Fitzgerald, Jesse Helms, Wilma Scott Heide, Peggy Madigan, Lamarr Mooneyham, Kathy Railsback, Phyllis Schlafly, Ellie Smeal, Gloria Steinem, and Monica Faith Stewart.

Terms of Access and Use:

Restrictions on access:

The Records are open to research according to the regulations of the Sophia Smith Collection with the exception of audiovisual materials that have not been reformatted for use by researchers. Viewing copies for selected footage are available on DVD.

Restrictions on use:

The Sophia Smith Collection owns copyright to the records created in the administration of the Equal Rights Amendment Campaign Archives Project and the documentary Who Will Protect the Family?. Virago Video (Lynn Kanter) owns copyright to the audiovisual material from the documentary Fighting for the Obvious. Permission must be obtained to publish reproductions or quotations beyond "fair use." Copyright to materials authored by other people or organizations may be owned by those individuals or organizations or their heirs or assigns. It is the responsibility of the researcher to identify and satisfy the holders of all copyrights.

Sophia Smith Collection
Smith College
Northampton, MA

Historical Note

The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was first introduced in the U.S. Congress in 1923. It was introduced in every session of Congress after that for nearly half a century. In 1971 the House of Representatives approved the proposed amendment. The Senate approved the amendment a year later. The issue was sent to the state legislatures and twenty states ratified the ERA almost immediately (Alaska, Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia, and Wisconsin). In 1973 Connecticut, South Dakota, Oregon, Minnesota, New Mexico, Vermont, Washington, and Wyoming ratified; Nebraska voted to rescind its ratification. Over the next few years, Maine, Montana and Ohio voted to ratify and Tennessee voted to rescind. In an effort to gain the additional three votes necessary for ratification, groups with many pro-ERA supporters boycotted states that had failed to ratify the Amendment. As the deadline for ratification loomed (22 March 1979), Representative Elizabeth Holtzman (D-NY) introduced a bill to extend the deadline for ratification. In October of 1978, Congress set a new deadline for the ERA--30 June 1982. In 1980 Ronald Reagan became the first president since the Equal Rights Amendment was sent to the states to oppose the ERA. On 30 June 1982 the ERA died, falling three states short of the necessary three-fourths ratification.

Beth Leopold worked on the National Organization for Women (NOW) campaign to ratify the ERA. After its defeat, she sought to ensure that the story of the fight for ratification would be preserved and began the Equal Rights Amendment Campaign Archives Project (ERACAP). The goal of the ERACAP was to "collect and process oral history and photographic materials relating to the ERA campaign between the years 1970 and 1982." The focus of the collecting was on the experiences of participants in the local, state, and national levels of the campaign.

The aim of the original project was to interview 150-200 people involved in the pro or anti-ERA work using archival quality open reel audiotape and to make typed transcripts of the interviews. There were also plans to create an index of the subjects covered in the interviews, along with photographs and a directory for additional materials related to the ERA campaign. Because funding for the project ran out in 1984, the oral history interviews were never created; however, Beth Leopold acted as intermediary between the Sophia Smith Collection and two documentary filmmakers to house their tapes and accompanying printed matter within the ERACAP collection. "Who Will Protect the Family?" was completed and aired on PBS in 1982. "Fighting for the Obvious" (Virago Video, 1982) was also completed, but it is uncertain whether it was shown by a major media outlet. In addition, Leopold's own ERA-related material came with the ERACAP materials.

Scope and Contents of the Collection

The ERACAP Records consist of 29.75 linear feet and are primarily related to the fight to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment between 1972 and 1982. Types of materials include correspondence, speeches, legal documents, photographs, press releases, reports, journal and newspaper articles, transcripts of interviews, audiocassettes, videocassettes, legislative records, logbooks, notes, documentary footage, and memorabilia.

The bulk of the records comprise audiovisual materials documenting the ERA fights in Illinois and North Carolina from two documentaries, Fighting for the Obvious and Who Will Protect the Family?. There is also considerable material relating to the National Organization for Women's work to pass the Equal Rights Amendment.

Notable individuals included in the documentary footage are: Alan Alda, Birch Bayh, Susan Cantinia, Midge Costanza, Dennis Cuddy, Donald Deuster, Frances Fitzgerald, Jake Garn, Jesse Helms, Wilma Scott Heide, Peggy Madigan, Lamarr Mooneyham, Kathy Railsback, Phyllis Schlafly, Eleanor Smeal, Gloria Steinem, and Monica Faith Stewart. A portion of the footage for each documentary has been reformatted to DVD viewing copies.


Information on Use
Terms of Access and Use
Restrictions on access:

The Records are open to research according to the regulations of the Sophia Smith Collection with the exception of audiovisual materials that have not been reformatted for use by researchers. Viewing copies for selected footage are available on DVD.

Restrictions on use:

The Sophia Smith Collection owns copyright to the records created in the administration of the Equal Rights Amendment Campaign Archives Project and the documentary Who Will Protect the Family?. Virago Video (Lynn Kanter) owns copyright to the audiovisual material from the documentary Fighting for the Obvious. Permission must be obtained to publish reproductions or quotations beyond "fair use." Copyright to materials authored by other people or organizations may be owned by those individuals or organizations or their heirs or assigns. It is the responsibility of the researcher to identify and satisfy the holders of all copyrights.

Preferred Citation

Please use the following format when citing materials from this collection:

Equal Rights Amendment Campaign Archives Project Records, Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College, Northampton, Mass.

History of the Collection

Lynn Kanter (Virago Video) donated the audiovisual materials from Fighting for the Obvious in 1984. Beth Leopold donated her personal papers and the records of ERACAP as well as Victoria Costello's materials relating to Who Will Protect the Family? to the Sophia Smith Collection in 1988.

Processing Information

Processed by Kara M. McClurken, 2004. Finding aid revised by Amy Hague and Olivia Mandica-Hart, 2011.


Additional Information
Contact Information
Sophia Smith Collection
Smith College
Northampton, MA 01063

Phone: (413) 585-2970
Fax: (413) 585-2886

Email Reference Form: http://www.smith.edu/libraries/libs/ssc/emailform.html
URL: http://www.smith.edu/libraries/libs/ssc/
Language
English
Series Descriptions
(1981-85)
.5 linear ft.

This series contains Beth Leopold's administrative records of the Equal Rights Amendment Campaign Archives Project, including the project proposal, ERACAP's financial and equipment needs, and correspondence with the Sophia Smith Collection. Most of the unrelated publications by history organizations and guides to oral histories have been removed from the collection.

(1970-83)
2.25 linear ft.

Beth Leopold's work at the National Organization for Women is documented in this series. Media projects played a large role in NOW's efforts to pass the ERA in the fifteen states where it hadn't yet passed. The ERA Countdown campaign materials include photocopies of images dating back to the early twentieth century that were selected for a film to document the struggle for the ERA, with the bulk of the images covering the 1970s and early 1980s. Other media-related projects for NOW can be found in the materials related to the Legal Defense and Education Fund. This series also covers several major marches and rallies for the ERA. The Capitol March for ERA focuses mostly on Chicago, where Leopold directed her energies. This series also includes subject files, memorabilia, and a bibliography of newspaper clippings from the New York Times related to the ERA from 1970 through 1982.

(1974-82)
2 linear ft.

This series is composed of the administrative and subject files of Victoria Costello, the director for Who Will Protect the Family?, an hour length color PBS documentary that examines the motivations, beliefs, and larger goals of the two movements fighting for and against the Equal Rights Amendment, focusing in particular on anti-ERA activist, Marilyn DeVries. And pro-ERA activist, Beth McAllister. Although the documentary specifically focuses on the three year battle to pass the ERA in North Carolina, the materials in this series relate to legislation, statistics, and organizations on both the state and national levels, as well as subjects that extend beyond the Equal Rights Amendment. Only a few transcripts from the film footage are in the collection; nevertheless, the few that exist provide valuable insight into the motivations of individuals fighting for and against the passage of the amendment, as do the brief summaries of selected footage in the Appendix. The audiovisual materials from the documentary are found in SERIES V. AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS.

(1982-84)
.25 linear ft.

This small series contains published and unpublished articles and essays that examine the Equal Rights Amendment, its defeat, and its supporters and opponents.

(1978-82)
17 linear ft.

This large series forms the bulk of the collection and includes 30 hours of videotape for Fighting for the Obvious (over 100 tapes), a documentary about the ERA fight in Illinois, as well as several hundred ¾ inch Umatics and ½ inch Betas from the PBS documentary Who Will Protect the Family?, which documents the ERA fight in North Carolina. A sample of original video footage for both documentaries has been reformatted and DVD viewing copies are available.

See Appendix for descriptions of reformatted footage.

Contents List
SERIES I. ERACAP ADMINISTRATION
(1981-85), .5 linear ft.


Contents


Box 1: folder 1
Project proposal,
1983-84, n.d.

Box 1: folder 2
Advisory board,
1983, n.d.

Box 1: folder 3
Letters of support,
1983

Box 1: folder 4
ERA materials to collect,
1981-83

Box 1: folder 5
Financial materials



Expenses,
1983, n.d.

Box 1: folder 6
Sources of funding,
1983, n.d.

Box 1: folder 7
Grantsmanship Center,
1983, n.d.

Box 1: folder 8
Tax-exempt status,
1984-85, n.d.

Box 1: folder 9
Correspondence

[see also Smith College]

1983-85

Box 1: folder 10
Memberships,
1982-84

Box 1: folder 11
Equipment and services,
1982-83, n.d.

Box 1: folder 12
Smith College,
1982-85


General,
1982-85

Box 1: folder 13
Alternative Career Conference,
April 15-16, 1983

Box 1: folder 14
SERIES II. NATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR WOMEN AND THE ERA
(1970-83)


Articles, pamphlets, and reports about the ERA,==ERA Countdown Campaign

[see also SERIES III. - Pro-ERA Countdown]

1979-80, n.d.

Box 1: folder 15
General,
1981-82, n.d.

Box 1: folder 16
Celebrity support,
1980-82, n.d.

Box 1: folder 17
Film,
1968-80, n.d.


Film images, 1-643


Box 2: folder 1-6
Photo log


Box 2: folder 7
" Film"



"NOW Music Selections:" audiocassette tape,

[digital file available]

n.d.

Box 2: folder 8
==Images,
1974, n.d.

Box 2: folder 9
LA Photo Log Images,
September 18, 1981

Box 2: folder 10
Correspondence, memos, and reports,
1981-82, n.d.

Box 2: folder 11
Speeches,
1982, n.d.

Box 2: folder 12
Virginia's ERA Struggle,
1982

Box 2: folder 13
Fundraising kit,
n.d.

Box 2: folder 14
Legal Defense and Education Fund



General,
1978-81, n.d.

Box 2: folder 15
Staff members,
n.d.

Box 2: folder 16
Projection Equal Education Rights (PEER),
1982

Box 3: folder 1
Media Project



General,
1980-82, n.d.

Box 3: folder 2
Advertising



Equipment,
1978-81, n.d.

Box 3: folder 3
Outdoor advertising,
1981

Box 3: folder 4
Public Service Announcements (PSAs)



Production companies,
1981

Box 3: folder 5
Sample scripts,
1981

Box 3: folder 6
Notes,
1981, n.d.

Box 3: folder 7
Radio,
1981-82

Box 3: folder 8
Television,

[see also Public Service Announcements]

1981-82

Box 3: folder 9
Artwork,
1981

Box 3: folder 10
Conferences and consultations



Freestyle evaluation conference,
1980

Box 3: folder 11
Michigan Media Project conference,
1980-81

Box 3: folder 12
State broadcasting action workshop,
n.d.

Box 4: folder 1
Vanguard Network proposal,
1982

Box 4: folder 2
Women in the media study,
1980-83, n.d.

Box 4: folder 3
Other conferences,
1980-81

Box 4: folder 4
ERA Awareness Week,
1981-82

Box 4: folder 5
Pilot Program,
1979-80, n.d.

Box 4: folder 6
Purchase orders,
1981-82

Box 4: folder 7
Status reports,
1981

Box 4: folder 8
Leadership mailing lists,
1979-82, n.d.

Box 4: folder 9
Marches, rallies, and other events



Springfield, IL: Rally,
16 May 1976

Box 4: folder 10
Washington, DC:
March, 9 Jul 1978

Box 4: folder 11
Washington, DC: ERA Inauguration Watch,
20 Jan 1980

Box 4: folder 12
San Antonio, TX: National Conference,
3-5 Oct 1980

Box 4: folder 13
Utah: Missionary Project,
9 Apr-19 Jul 1981

Box 4: folder 14
ERA Walkathons,
Aug 1981

Box 4: folder 15
Washington, DC: National Conference,
10-12 Oct 1981

Box 4: folder 16
Illinois: Fast for Justice,
May 1982

Box 4: folder 17
Capitol March for ERA,
6 June 1982

Box 4
Kits


Box 4: folder 18
Illinois



Contracts


Box 5: folder 1
General notes


Box 5: folder 2
Letters to ERA supporters


Box 5: folder 3
Musicians


Box 5: folder 4
Material order forms


Box 5: folder 5
Newspaper clippings


Box 5: folder 6
Organizational materials


Box 5: folder 7
Outreach


Box 5: folder 8
Planning materials


Box 5: folder 9-10
Recruitment


Box 5: folder 11
Washington, DC: Rally,
30 Jun 1982

Box 5: folder 12
PAC/Woman Walkathon,
28 Aug 1982

Box 5: folder 13
Post-ERA response by NOW: Vote out the opposition,
1982

Box 5: folder 14
Other state/local activities,
1980-82

Box 5: folder 15
Unidentified ERA events: negatives and proof sheets,
n.d.

Box 5: folder 16-17
Media Reform Committee



General,
1979-81, n.d.

Box 5: folder 18
Communications technology,
1980, n.d.

Box 5: folder 19
Federal Communications Commission and discrimination,
1979-81, n.d.

Box 5: folder 20
Memorabilia



Buttons,
1982, n.d.

Box 5: folder 21
Ribbons, posters, and ERA "business cards,"
1977-82, n.d.

Box 6: folder 1
Stickers,
n.d.

Box 6: folder 2
Newspaper clippings



General
1981-82, n.d.

Box 6: folder 3
NOW Convention,
1982

Box 6: folder 4
NOW Press releases,
1980-82

Box 6: folder 5
Protests



Movie: Windows,
1980

Box 6: folder 6
Appointment of Rex E. Lee as Solicitor General,
1981

Box 6: folder 7
Subject files



Draft case/women in the military,
1980-81

Box 6: folder 8
Reagan, Ronald: newspaper clippings,
1980-83

Box 6: folder 9
Reproductive rights,
1980-82, n.d.

Box 6: folder 10
Other women's issues,
1980-83, n.d.

Box 6: folder 11
SERIES III. WHO WILL PROTECT THE FAMILY? DOCUMENTARY

[see also SERIES V. -Who Will Protect the Family?]

(1974-82, n.d.)


Video logs



Raleigh, NC,
1979

Box 6: folder 12
Pro/anti-ERA groups and people,
1981

Box 13
Transcripts, audiocassettes 1-6
Aug 1981:

Box 13: folder 14-19
Publicity,
1982

Box 13: folder 20
Notes and questions,
1981, n.d.

Box 13: folder 21
Archival visuals (North Carolina),
1981, n.d.

Box 13: folder 22
North Carolina contacts,
1981, n.d.

Box 13: folder 23
Anti-ERA



General: articles and newspaper clippings,
1979-82, n.d.

Box 13: folder 24
American Family Institute,
1980, n.d.

Box 25
American Life Lobby,

[see also OVERSIZE MATERIALS]

1979-81, n.d.

Box 26
Christianity and Politics conference 1976-81, n.d.
(8-9 May 1981),

Box 7: folder 1
Cuddy, Dennis,
1978-81, n.d.

Box 7: folder 2
DeVries, Marilyn,
1980, n.d.

Box 7: folder 3
Family Protection Reporter,
1979-81

Box 7: folder 4
Marshner, Connie

[see also Family Protection Reporter]



Box 7
Moral Majority,

[see also oversize box 12]

1980-81, n.d.

Box 7: folder 5
The Right Woman,
1979-81, n.d.

Box 7: folder 6
Schlafly, Phyllis

[see also Stop ERA]



Box 7
Stop ERA,
1980-82

Box 7: folder 7
Other anti-ERA groups,
1979-82, n.d.

Box 7: folder 8
Pro-ERA



General: articles, newspaper clippings, and speeches,
1978-81, n.d.

Box 7: folder 9
Congressional Union,
1981

Box 7: folder 10
ERA America,
1978-80

Box 7: folder 11-12
30 Jun 1981

Box 7: folder 13
Johnson, Sonya


Box 7: folder 14
McAllister, Beth,
1981, n.d.

Box 7: folder 15
Ms. Meeting,
26 May 1981

Box 7: folder 16
North Carolina Council of Churches,
1981, n.d.

Box 7: folder 17
Pamphlets,
1978-80, n.d.

Box 7: folder 18
Shoulder to Shoulder March for the ERA,
2 May 1981

Box 7: folder 19
New York Times ERA timeline,card file
1970-82:

Box 7a
North Carolina
1981 legislative session


Abortion


Box 8: folder 1
Background information,
1979-81, n.d.

Box 8: folder 2
Day care
1981 legislative session

Box 3
Equal Rights Amendment


Box 3: folder 4
Marital property distribution


Box 3: folder 5
Other bills


Box 3: folder 6
U.S. Congress



Abortion/Human Life Amendment,

[see also Family Protection Act]

1980-81, n.d.

Box 3: folder 7
Economic Equity Act,
1981

Box 3: folder 8
Equal Rights Amendment,
1978, 1981

Box 3: folder 9
Family Protection Act,
1981

Box 3
CRS Report and Analysis


Box 3: folder 10
Legislation


Box 3: folder 11
Summaries


Box 12
Social Security,
1981

Box 12: folder 13
Voting records,
1980-81

Box 12: folder 14
Subjects and statistics



Abortion,
1979-81, n.d.

Box 12: folder 15
Apparel and tobacco industry,
1978-81

Box 12: folder 16
Day care,
1980-81, n.d.

Box 12: folder 17
Divorce statistics,
1981, n.d.

Box 9: folder 1
Domestic violence,
1977-81

Box 9: folder 2
Families,
1978-82


General,
1980

Box 9: folder 3
National,
1978-82

Box 9: folder 4
Juvenile criminal behavior,
1979-81

Box 9: folder 5-6
North Carolina statistics,
1978-81, n.d.


Employment,
1978-81

Box 9: folder 7
General,
1974-81

Box 9: folder 8
Original grids,
n.d.

Box 9: folder 9
Personal Income,
1973-81

Box 10: folder 1
Planned Parenthood: activities and criticisms of,

[see also Sex Education]

1980-81, n.d.

Box 10: folder 2
Sex education,
1981

Box 10: folder 3
Teenage pregnancy,
1976-81, n.d.

Box 10: folder 4
Textbooks,
1974-81, n.d.

Box 10: folder 5
Women,
1975-81, n.d.

Box 10: folder 6-7
SERIES IV. ERA DEFEAT
(1982-84, n.d.), .25 linear ft.


Susan Harding articles and papers,
1981-1983

Box 11: folder 1
ERA essays in OAH newsletter,
1982-83

Box 11: folder 2
"The Equal Rights Amendment: Anatomy of a Failure," PS,
Fall 1982

Box 11: folder 3
Jennifer Jackman/Tamar Raphael project,

[note: most of the audiotapes and transcripts from this project are located in the Women's Rights Collection; see also Correspondence in SERIES I]

1983-84

Box 11: folder 4-6
Until Justice is Done: The Fight for the ERA,
Spring 1983

Box 11: folder 7
SERIES V. AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS
(1978-82, n.d.)


DVD viewing copies of unedited documentary footage

[see Appendix for full descriptions]




Who Will Protect the Family?



Nos. 1-78


Box 13
Nos. 79-123


Box 14
Fighting for the Obvious



Nos. 1-44


Box 14
Nos. 45-72


Box 15
DVD preservation masters

[CLOSED]



Box 16-17
Digital Beta tapes

[CLOSED]



Box 18-28
Original ¾" umatic videotapes

[CLOSED][For full list of original tapes, contact the SSC]



Box 29-45
OVERSIZE MATERIALS



American Life Lobby: A.LL. About Issues, Mar1981
Oct 1980-

Box 12
"ERA YES" sign


Box 12
Moral Majority Report (5 issues),
1980-81

Box 12
Moral Majority: poster,
n.d.

Box 12
"The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter": invitation mock-up,
1981

Box 12
"Tell Me a Riddle": invitation mock-up,
1981

Box 12
SAM: Soldier, Sailor, Airman, Marine, "Women in Combat?...Let's Get Serious"
Feb 1980:

Box 12
Sash forERA march
1980

Box 12

Search Terms
The following terms represent persons, organizations, and topics documented in this collection. Use these headings to search for additional materials on this web site, in the Five College Library Catalog, or in other library catalogs and databases.

Subjects
  • Equal Rights Amendment Campaign Archives Project
  • Equal rights amendments--Illinois--History--Sources
  • Equal rights amendments--North Carolina--History--Sources
  • Equal rights amendments--United States--History--Sources
  • Family--Social aspects--United States--History--20th century--Sources
  • Feminism--United States--History--20th century--Sources
  • Feminists--United States--History--20th century--Sources
  • Fitzgerald, Frances, 1940-
  • McAllister, Beth
  • Moral Majority, Inc.
  • National Organization for Women--History--Sources
  • Oral history--methodology
  • Schlafly, Phyllis
  • Women's rights--United States--History--Sources


APPENDIX: DOCUMENTARY SUMMARIES

Who Will Protect the Family?

This footage is from the 1982 hour-long PBS documentary that examines both sides of the ERA fight in North Carolina. According to the official press release from the filmmaker, Victoria Costello, Who Will Protect the Family? "is an intimate, personal, political chronicle of the last three years [1979-1982] in the controversial struggle in North Carolina between the political organizations and individual activists of the conservative, born-again, Christian political movement, and the liberal women's movement."

Reporter Frances Fitzgerald is a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, and Victoria Costello is an independent video producer based in Washington, D.C. Together, they gained behind-the-scenes access to political meetings, lobbying efforts, and the workplaces and homes of those involved in both sides of the struggle. The central focus of the documentary is the "evolving lives of two North Carolina activists," Beth McAllister, a feminist, and Marilyn DeVries, a conservative Christian. Other footage includes a Christian high school graduation, the first pro-ERA march ever held in North Carolina; a Father's Day service at the church of Reverend Lamarr Mooneyham, the Chairman of North Carolina's Moral Majority; a Father's Day picnic, organized by Black feminists in the Black community of Raleigh; and several personal confrontations between conservative and feminist movement members and leaders.

*In addition to these footage excerpts, the Sophia Smith Collection also has a copy of the documentary in its entirety.

Individuals Appearing in Footage

NameInformation
Alan AldaActor/ERA activist
Pat BlackstonePro-ERA organizer, Hickory, North Carolina
Rep. Louise BrennanNorth Carolina Legislature
Phyllis ClayBeautician, Hickory, North Carolina
Dr. Dennis CuddyAnti-Abortion activist, Raleigh, North Carolina
Marilyn DeVries Anti-ERA activist
Miriam DorseyN.C. Council on the Status of Women
Employees of Ridgeview HosieryHickory, North Carolina
Hugh GaitherOwner, Ridgeview Hosiery, Hickory, N.C.
Alice Wynn GatsisChairwoman, N.C. United Against ERA
Senator Rachel GrayNorth Carolina Legislature
Richard HatchWUNC-TV/PBS, Raleigh, North Carolina
U.S. Senator Jesse HelmsRepublican, North Carolina
Jackie KaalandERAmerica
Senator Craig LawingPresident Pro-Tempore, NC Legislature
Beth McAllisterPro-ERA activist
The McAllister FamilyRaleigh, North Carolina
Rev. H. Lamarr MooneyhamState Chairman, N.C. Moral Majority, Inc.
League of Women VotersHickory, North Carolina
Phyllis SchlaflyEagle Forum, Inc.
Eleanor "Ellie" SmealNOW
Rev. Robert Settle & FamilyHickory, North Carolina
Gloria SteinemMS. Magazine
Tabernacle Baptist ChurchHickory, North Carolina
Tri-City Baptist ChurchDurham, North Carolina
Paul WeyreichCommittee for Survival of a Free Congress

Fighting for the Obvious

Fighting for the Obvious focuses on the fight for the ERA in Illinois, another key state in the battle for ratification. The footage features many pro-ERA activists and legislators, and their struggle to get the ERA ratified, and also includes interviews with anti-ERA legislators and protestors. Filming locations include the Illinois Legislature, activists' homes, and outdoor rally locations.

*The ERACAP Records do not include a final version of Fighting for the Obvious, and we have been unable to locate a copy. As far as we know, this footage is all that remains.

Individuals Appearing in Footage

NameInformation
Mary BrandonWork Coordinator, Chicago NOW Chapter
Rep. Susan CataniaPro-ERA Illinois Republican Representative
Anne CourtneyLeader of a local IL NOW Chapter/ERA Coalition
Rep. Donald DeusterAnti-ERA Illinois Republican Representative
Wilma Scott HeideFeminist/ERA activist
Clara JohnstonPro-ERA activist
Kristen LemsSinger-songwriter from Evanston, Illinois
Peggy MadiganVolunteer organizer for Chicago NOW Chapter
Linda MillerCo-Director of ERA Countdown Campaign
Kathy RailsbackMember of Chicago NOW Chapter
Phyllis SchlaflyAnti-ERA conservative leader
Carol SwinneyOutreach Coordinator of NOW

"Who Will Protect the Family?" and "Fighting for the Obvious"

Descriptions of Reformatted Portion of Raw Footage

"Who Will Protect the Family?"

DVD #1, "Anti-ERA Group, Pt. 2, n.d."

An anti-ERA group is interviewed at a STOP ERA rally in front of the North Carolina Legislature in 1979. Phyllis Schlafly and her involvement in the STOP ERA campaign and her anti-ERA views are discussed, as well as women and social security, women and work, the family and the ERA, affirmative action, and the International Women's Year.

DVD #2, "GARN press conference and pt. 1 of Bayh press conference (#16), n.d."

US Senators Birch Bayh and Jake Garn, among others, discuss ERA and its constitutionality, rescission and amendment of the bill, and women and the military draft.

DVD #3, "Gloria Steinmen [Steinem] interview - phone calls (#17), n.d."

Gloria Steinem is interviewed in Washington, D.C. in 1979. She discusses speaking at the Joan of Arc Church in Minneapolis about religion and the ERA, as well as the difficulty of organizing a grassroots letter campaign for the ERA. She mentions Coretta Scott King's meeting with Senator Birch Bayh regarding the Humphrey Hawkins Bill and the ERA extension vote. She also discusses her concerns about the Florida ERA vote and the voting practices taking place in FL.

DVD #4, "Gloria Steinmen [Steinem] interview, end; beginning of victory party for House extension, n.d."

*Sound does not work from 2-minute mark to 4:30-minute mark.

After the House of Representatives' vote on the extension of the ERA Bill in Washington, D.C. Pro-ERA interviews include Gloria Steinem. Issues discussed are abortion and the Right to Life Amendment, Kate Millett and Sexual Politics, and Eleanor Smeal's ERA contributions.

DVD #5, "Excerpts from PBS abortion show, 1979"

Excerpts from a PBS documentary on abortion. Topics include clergy people for the restoration of government funded abortions, computer technology, abortion lobbying, abortions and class structure, mass mailings, Richard Viguerie and the New Right, and single-issue groups.

DVD #6, "Marilyn and Bob at home pt. 1, 1979"

Interview with Marilyn and Bob DeVries at their home in 1979 as part of Victoria Costello's documentary. Marilyn and Bob DeVries discuss Alice Winn Gatsis, North Carolinians against ERA, the Humanist Manifesto, family structure and lesbian mothers, The Spirit of Houston, the First National Women's Conference, Beth McAllister and North Carolinians for ERA, Senator Billy Mills, media bias towards ERA (more coverage of pro-ERA, William Ball, Esq. (a constitutional lawyer investigating ERA), and appointments and delegations to the International Women's Year.

DVD #7, "ERA Song, 1978"

At a 1978 NOW Conference, songs performed are "Take a Look at my People," about the black community and ERA, by an unknown performer. Kristen Lems, a founder of the National Women's Music Festival, performs "Mammary Glands" and "ERA Ballad." Individuals appearing include Gloria Steinem, Penny Rosenwasser, and Dean Mackey. "Friday's Victory" and five years of ERA rallies are discussed.

DVD #8, "Scott interview, pt. 2; Aurabelle [Laurabelle Yoder] after vigil (#8), n.d."

In 1979, members of Congress discuss the constitutionality of extending ERA for 7 years, and instead compromise on a 3-year extension to 1982. Issues discussed are rescinding of state ERA, the predicted outcome of the ERA, interest and popular involvement around ERA, and Senator Birch Bayh's forum on ERA voters. Interview with Senator Bill Scott of the Virginia Dept. of Navy, Airforce, Marine Corps, and Army, about ERA. Pro-ERA students lobby. Interview with Laurabelle Yoder, local ERA lobbyist in North Carolina.

DVD #9, "vigil and GARN interview, pt. 1 (#9)"

ERA Rally on the steps of the United States Congress in 1979 before the 3-year extension of the bill. Discussion of the Mormon Church and pro-ERA members, the Mormon Constitution, ERA extension, ERA vs. opposition to equal rights, constitutionality of extension, sex discrimination, and the status of women. Individuals appearing include Sonya Johnson of the Mormon Church (before her ex-communication), Senator Hatch of Utah, and Senator Garn of Utah.

DVD #10, "TCI taping of WRAL show, 'Pro and Con,' (#4), n.d."

Discussion of the pros and cons of the ERA from anti- and pro-ERA view on the television show "Pro and Con" aired on NBC's WRAL channel in 1979. Individuals appearing include Beth McAllister and Alice Winn Gatsis. Issues discussed are Alice Paul and the beginning of the ERA, rescinding of ratified state ERA, ratification of national ERA, public hearings in the NC general assembly, equal rights versus the ERA, upholding the nuclear family structure, protection for women, and the 14th Amendment.

DVD #11, "Gloria Steinem interview (#19), n.d."

On the steps of the United States Congress, individuals speak about the 1979 vote to extend the ERA in the senate. Individuals appearing are Gloria Steinem and Laurabelle Yoder. Discussion includes grassroots support, Ellie Smeal and the NOW Action Center, and the votes of Senators Holtzman and Edwards. On Part 2 of the DVD, Gloria Steinem discusses people against women's autonomy in the home, ERA and its lack of impact on abortion laws, family values, child support, divorce, and marriage as an equal partnership.

DVD #12, "Marilyn and Bob @ home, pt. 2, n.d."

Bob and Marilyn DeVries are interviewed at home in North Carolina in 1978 for "Who Will Protect the Family?" Pros and cons of ERA are discussed, such as southern voters and the ERA, God and the creation of the family, how Marilyn got involved in the anti-ERA movement, North Carolina churches and the ERA, the laws that already exist to protect the family and equality, media treatment of the ERA, the draft, and the economy.

DVD #13, "Ellen Goodman abortion show PBS, 1979"

This DVD is an excerpt from a PBS show on abortion with Ellen Goodman in 1978. Discussions include the impact of minority groups and single-issue voters in national votes, the Right to Life Amendment, the right to privacy, Roe v. Wade and its affect on privacy, the correlations between conservative views and abortion, pro-choice as pro-family, the fetus having more "protected rights under the law" than an adult, Gallup poll on abortion, and safe, legal abortions.

DVD #14, "Gloria Steinem interview (#18), n.d."

This interview with Gloria Steinem takes place before Congress voted to extend the ERA ratification deadline. Steinem discusses the votes in Florida, as well as the possibilities for ratification in Illinois, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Arizona. Also covered is the state legislature ratification process; D.C. voting rights; ERA and economics; ERA, the Mormon church, and the Utah legislature; misleading syntax and names of laws and bills; public opinion polls; extension and the economic boycott; what will happen if extension fails; media and the treatment of ERA; divided voters; and discrimination lawsuits.

DVD #15, "Beth and Marilyn, hallway conversation (#5), n.d."

Beth McAllister and Marilyn DeVries have a discussion in the hallway of WRA: 5 TV, North Carolina (ABC) after the taping of the show "Pro and Con" with Alice Winn Gatsis and Beth McAllister in 1979. They discuss the conflicting Supreme Court precedent around the ERA, ERA and homemakers, family life and structure and the ERA, ERA as a "communist" document, NOW and radicalism, sexual morality, and religion and the ERA.

DVD #16, "Gloria Steinem interview, summertime on the lawn (#3), n.d."

Gloria Steinem is interviewed after the House of Representatives' extension on the ratification of the ERA. She discusses Congresswoman Holtzman's stance on the ERA, how her life experiences have affected her feminist views, feminism's portrayal in the media and the press, her creation of Ms. Magazine, and the ERA march in Washington D.C. in 1979.

DVD #17, "Weddington and Sonya interview (#21), n.d."

Sonya Johnson is interviewed in Washington, D.C. before her excommunication from the Mormon Church. She discusses the church's lack of support of the ERA and she also discusses the Potomac Area LDS Women's Coalition. In all fifteen unratified states, women from the Mormon congregations go to organizational meetings and teach women how to lobby against the ERA using John Birch Society materials from Phyllis Schlafly. She also discusses the power and financial prowess of the Mormon Church in its anti-ERA activities, but also mentions that the president of the LDS has not yet spoken out against ERA.

DVD #18, "ERA supporters office (#19), 1979"

Supporters volunteer at a phone bank for the ERA in Raleigh, NC in 1979. Issues discussed are lobbying women around the state to contact their local governments in support of ERA, and the logistics behind phone-a-thons and mass mailings.

DVD #19, "Hall outside committee room (#16), 1979"

Beth McAllister is interviewed after the North Carolina Senate Committee on Constitutional Amendments killed the ERA bill in its first session. Senator Rachel Gray is interviewed as well, and expresses hope for the next vote. Pitt County and Martin County Representatives who opposed the ERA are interviewed. There are also local news station interviews with Beth McAllister and anti-ERA representatives.

DVD #20, "Beth and group outside after vote (#17), n.d."

*Footage stops after 9 minutes.

Beth McAllister and other pro-ERA women are interviewed outside of the North Carolina legislature. They discuss the North Carolinian defeat of the ERA and their hopes for the future.

DVD #21, "WPJL radio show pt 3 (#8), 1979"

Marilyn DeVries and Alice Winn Gatsis continue their WPJL radio call-in show. Topics include state vs. federal ERA bills, homosexual marriage, and legal cases regarding the ERA (Henderson v. Henderson).

DVD #22, "Beth at home (#9), n.d."

Beth McAllister and her husband are interviewed at home about the ERA Campaign in late 1978/early 1979. Issues discussed are the upcoming Senate vote and the General Assembly Constitutional Committee meeting at the NC legislature, the process of lobbying government officials, morality and ERA, and Senator Rachel Gray's support of the ERA.

DVD #23, "ERA supporters in their offices (#10), n.d."

Continuing footage of volunteer ERA supporters at a phone bank in Raleigh, NC in 1979. Topics include potential strategies, and the votes of various politicians. Jessie Rae Scott is also interviewed briefly.

DVD #24, "Jessie Rae Interview (#11), n.d."

Jesse Rae Scott is interviewed in 1979. She discusses phone banks urging citizens to send messages to legislatures, grassroots lobbying efforts such as letter writing campaigns, her own meetings with the governor and legislators, misconceptions about the ERA, planning for the ERA public hearing which were to include speakers such as Dr. William Aycock, a law professor at UNC Chapel Hill, and Dr. Perry Young of Duke University, a minister who spoke on career planning.

DVD #25, "Jessie on the phone in Miller's office (#12), n.d."

Jessie Rae Scott telephones various people to ask for their support of the ERA bill. She calls Dr. Winston and asks him to speak at an ERA hearing. She also discusses Cecil Hill, Dr. Young, and Dr. Aycock.

DVD #26, "Rachel Gray's office canvassing before the vote, n.d."

Beth McAllister, Jesse Rae Scott, Miriam Badowski, Susan Green, and Senator Rachel Gray converse in Gray's office at the NC legislature building in 1979, discussing the upcoming ERA vote in the NC Constitutional Amendments Committee later that morning. They anticipate that the ERA would be temporarily defeated for two years and speculated that the committee does not want the bill to get as far as the state senate. Other issues mentioned are meetings with Cecil Hill, chair of the Constitutional Amendments Committee, and meetings with the other members of the Committee.

DVD #27, "Craig Lawling [Lawing] interview (#14), n.d."

"Stop ERA" supporters discuss their views. Governor Robert Scott reflects on the defeat of the ERA and his hopes for the future of the bill. Beth McAllister and Senator Craig Lawing discuss his formal support of the bill.

DVD #28, "Beth McAllister and group at lunch, newsroom (#15), n.d."

Interview and discussion with Beth McAllister at the NC ERA office in 1979, one week before the first vote of the year on the ERA in the NC Senate. Individuals appearing include Beth McAllister, her administrative assistant Basil Burn, and Jessie Rae Scott. They discuss the philosophy behind the opposition, the anti-ERA campaign in general, and address issues concerning many voters in the NC House and Senate. Other topics covered include homosexual marriage, discrimination against the elderly, social security, fundamentalist churches and ministries, fundraising, the John Birch Society, and ERA as a legal versus social issue.

DVD #29, "Marilyn at home, beginning, n.d."

Marilyn DeVries and her husband are interviewed at home. Topics include the structure of the family, the legality of the ERA, Sam Ervin, the media, the potential harms and dangers of the ERA, Gloria Steinem/Betty Freidan and the "Humanist Manifesto," the National Gay and Lesbian Taskforce, Henderson v. Henderson, humanism vs. Christianity, and the breakdown of moral standards due to homosexuals, feminists, and the ERA movement, etc.

DVD #30, "Craig Lawling [Lawing] interview (#24), n.d."

Continuing footage showing Beth McAllister, Senator Craig Lawing, Senator Rachel Gray, and others, discussing Lawing's support of the ERA. Topics include Jessie Rae Scott, Lawing's philosophy on the ERA and the evolution of his ideas, political strategies concerning the passage of the ERA, killing the bill in committee, etc. Footage then shows a group of pro-ERA supporters (including Beth McAllister) waiting for the results of a legislative vote.

DVD #31, "ERA Rally, crowd shots, 2 anti ERA interviews, 1979"

Assistant news director Mike Kozel of a local NC news station conducts interviews with crowd members outside of the North Carolina State Legislature building at an ERA rally in early 1979. Particular focus is on anti-ERA representatives from Fayetteville and Cumberland county and NC church groups. Interviewees discuss women's rights and the ERA, the constitutionality of ERA, abortion and infanticide, and single-issue church groups.

DVD #32, "WPJL radio show continued (#21), n.d."

*DVD may not work in DVD player or Mac computer.

Part two of the WPJL radio call-in show with Marilyn DeVries and Alice Winn Gatsis. Issues discussed are retirement and the ERA, abortion, Henderson v. Henderson, humanist philosophy, marriage and marriage complications, women's roles, and ERA's constitutionality.

DVD #33, "Interview with Betty in office pt 1 (#22), 1979"

Beth McAllister, Basil Burns, Senator Rachel Gray, and others are filmed in the office. Beth McAllister discusses her role in the pro-ERA movement. Other discussion topics include anti-ERA rhetoric, Beth's upcoming debate against Alice Winn Gatsis, homosexual marriages, the John Birch Society, Jesse Helms, Beth's family, her personal views on the ERA, and her credentials/career history.

DVD #34, "Beth McAllister and Kim Spencer questioning Cockerham, n.d."

North Carolina General Assembly, winter 1979. Beth McAllister, George Miller, and Jack Stevens discuss the possibility of ERA ratification. Senator Walter C. Cockerham holds a press conference in which he announces that he has conducted a poll in his district and the results are not in favor of the ERA. Beth McAllister asks him if he will release his poll results so that they can be CPA-certified, but he refuses. Beth McAllister is then herself interviewed by members of the press. Finally, Beth McAllister and Senator Rachel Gray discuss the possibility of Senator William Craig Lawing killing the ERA bill in committee.

DVD #35, "WPJL radio show, beginning (#20), n.d."

First part of 1979 WPJL footage (1 of 3). Marilyn DeVries and Alice Winn Gatsis on the North Carolina Christian radio station, WPJL ("We Proclaim Jesus Lord"). They introduce themselves and their views on the ERA. Marilyn DeVries declares that the ERA is "overkill," and Alice Winn Gatsis argues that God made men and women different, therefore the ERA will create societal chaos. DeVries and Gatsis answer questions from callers, both pro- and anti-ERA. Other topics include Senator Sam Ervin's arguments against the ERA, and the effects of the ERA on homosexuality as a legal institution, abortion, pornography, and the draft.

DVD #36, "Interview with Beth in office (#18), 1979"

*DVD stops playing after approximately 14 minutes.

North Carolina ERA headquarters, 1979. Basil Burns, Beth McAllister's administrative assistant, discusses the pro-ERA reactions to the Marilyn DeVries and Alice Winn Gatsis WPJL radio show. Burns refutes their claims that homosexual marriages were allowed in Colorado as a result of the ERA. Beth McAllister then contemplates the differences between the philosophies of the pro- and anti-ERA leaders, while Basil Burns suggests that for the majority of anti-ERA followers, it is merely a question of an "information gap." Other issues discussed include the construction of the family and the anti-ERA's position on the Biblical family model.

DVD #37, "Radio show on abortion, pt. 2 (7), n.d."

Continuation of DVD #35: Second part of 1979 WPJL footage (2 of 3). Marilyn DeVries and Alice Winn Gatsis continue their discussion by questioning the meaning of "sex" in the text of the ERA bill. They also explain that ERA proponents are secular humanists and atheists who support abortions on demand and "homosexual resolutions" at last year's 25-Point National Plan of Action. They mention that Gloria Steinem wants to overthrow the Biblical patriarchy. DeVries and Gatsis answer questions from callers, and DeVries argues that the ERA will make homosexuality seem normal (by allowing homosexual marriage and homosexuals to adopt), but that it is, and always will be, "sick." DeVries calls the ERA "anti-God, anti-family [and] phony."

DVD #38, "Who will protect the family, Hickory shoot, Pat @ LWV meeting #1-3, 1981"

First part of the League of Women Voters gathering, Catawba County, North Carolina. Pat Blackstone and other members of the LWV discuss various issues, such as the freedom of choice vs. right to life and NC Senator Jesse Helms' attempt to remove family planning options from foreign aid. Blackstone and a group of older women talk about the ERA and its relationship to divorce, retirement, widowhood, Social Security, the wage gap (women earn $.59 to a man's $1.00), spousal abuse/domestic violence.

DVD #39, "Who will protect the family, Hickory shoot, Pat @ LWV meeting, Tape #2, 1981

*DVD stops playing after approximately 20 minutes.

Second part of the LWV gathering footage (2 of 3). Pat Blackstone and the group of LWV discuss the Commission on the Status of Women; the need for a rape crisis center in Catawba County; and women's universal need for love, worth, and a feeling of importance. Another topic discussed is the need for factory women to have good daycare for their children and adequate wages to pay for it. Pat Blackstone mentions that the American Bar Association had estimated that it would take 475 years to eliminate all of the discriminatory laws against women in the United States.

DVD #40, "Who will protect the family, Hickory shoot, Pat @ LWV meeting, Tape #3, 1981

*DVD stops playing after approximately 13 minutes.

Third part of the LWV gathering footage (3 of 3). Pat Blackstone and the group discuss the philosophy of anti-ERA women and give their answers to the question, "who will protect the family?" At the end, Pat gives an informal speech to the LWV on their support of the ERA, the desire to halt the building of an oil refinery off the North Carolina Coast due to the possible negative environmental effects, and how to deal with the upcoming budget cuts.

DVD #41, "Factory, lunch discussion, Hickory, #7, 1981"

Pat Blackstone asks female North Carolinian Ridgeview Mills factory workers why men get paid more than women even though they do the same jobs that are equally difficult. Other topics include the need for daycare at the factory and a discussion in response to the question, "who will protect the family?"

DVD #42, "Factory #5, 1981"

Some of the women from DVD #41 working in the Ridgeview Mills hosiery factory. They talk about how long they've worked there, opinions on the ERA, their "life stories."

DVD #43, "Pat and family discussion at dinner #12, n.d."

Pat Blackstone with her husband and two children at their home. Pat tells the story of "Phyllis," a rape victim whose rapist was acquitted because of Phyllis' "lifestyle." The family is recorded at dinner, discussing the children's schooldays. After dinner, Pat and her husband are questioned about their marriage. Pat's husband discusses his opinions as a mental health professional and describes "families in transition."

DVD #44, "Chris Settle #11, n.d."

*DVD stops playing after approximately 16 minutes.

Pat Blackstone talks to her hair stylist while she gets her hair cut at the salon. The footage then cuts to a 1981 Catholic high school graduation. Senior Chris Settle gives a speech.

DVD #45, "Settle Yard, Poovey, George and Mary Morris #14"

Continuing footage of post-graduation ceremonies. Footage then shifts to a conversation with Representative George Poovey, George and Mary Morris, Reverend and Mrs. Settle, and others, discussing the pro-family movement and the reasons for "breakdown of the family," such as women working outside of the home. Other topics include childcare and the separation of church and state.

DVD #46, "Interview with Hugh Gaither, Hickory, 1981"

An interview with Hugh Gaither, the Financial Officer of the Ridgeview Mills hosiery factory in Catawba County. He discusses the mill's payment methods/compensation philosophy, management/employee relations, his views on providing on-site daycare, and his support of the ERA (influenced by his mother's opinions).

DVD #47, "Phyllis rape story #9, Hickory, 1981"

DVD begins with more footage of Ridgeview Mills factory workers, then switches to Pat Blackstone at her hair salon. Her hair stylist, Phyllis, discusses her "life story:" marriage, divorce, children, her career, single parenting, etc.

DVD #48, "Phyllis rape story #10, 1981"

Continuing footage of Pat Blackstone's conversation with Phyllis. Discussion topics include myths about the ERA, hostile reactions/threats Pat has received, and women in opposition to the ERA. Then, Phyllis begins to discuss her rape trial and her rapist's subsequent acquittal. Phyllis describes her polygraph test, her treatment by the prosecution in the courtroom, and the little support she received from the District Attorney's office.

DVD #49, "Unidentified #13, n.d."

Continuing footage of the 1981 Catholic high school graduation ceremony, including the commencement speech, songs, the distribution of diplomas, a prayer, and the end of the ceremony.

DVD #50, "Settle Yard #15, NC Hickory, 1981"

Continuing footage of the conversation with Representative George Poovey, George and Mary Morris, Reverend and Mrs. Settle, and others. Topics include secular humanism, "misguided" liberals, public schools vs. Christian schools, education in the home, problems with the welfare system, and domestic violence/the breakdown of the family structure.

DVD #51, "Settle Yard #16, NC Hickory, 1981"

Continuing footage of the conversation with Representative George Poovey, George and Mary Morris, Reverend and Mrs. Settle, and others. Reverend Settle discusses how secular humanism has undermined the values of the home, and men feel frustrated because they are no longer the head of the household, which has led to an increase in domestic violence. Therefore, domestic violence will stop once wives become submissive to their husbands. Mary and George Morris discuss their marital dynamics and how they have improved since Mary abandoned feminism for Christianity and complete submission to George. Representative Poovey talks about the problems with the ERA and states that "men and women are not equal." Members of the groups then answer the question, "who will protect the family?"

DVD #52, "ERA hearing, Sam Ervin's speech, 1979"

A Joint House and Senate hearing on the ERA. Begins with introductions, rules, etc., then Senator Sam Ervin gives an anti-ERA speech in which he argues that the ERA is unnecessary and unconstitutional.

DVD #53, "ERA-NC tape 5, Beth Ch. 1, Shotgun Ch. 2, n.d."

Footage of the filmmaker's sister describing her struggle with drug abuse/addiction, beginning as a teenager and continuing into her adulthood.

DVD #54, "NC Hickory #8, 1981"

More footage of a female worker in the Ridgeview Mills hosiery factory. Discussion topics include a typical work day/routine, low wages/wage disparities, and social issues.

DVD #55, "Factory, interview, begin lunch scene, 1981"

Continuing footage of the Ridgeview Mills hosiery factory. Factory workers talk to Pat Blackstone about their life experiences, political opinions, and views on the ERA.

DVD #56, "Unidentified 17, 1981"

*Sound stops working at 19 minutes.

Continuing footage of the conversation with Representative George Poovey, George and Mary Morris, Reverend and Mrs. Settle, and others. Topics include religion vs. the state, "who will protect the family?" (God), approval of President Reagan's current presidency, liberalism, welfare, etc.

DVD #57, "Fitzgerald conservatives #1, 1981"

Group of "North Carolinians Against ERA" conservatives discuss topics such as the specific language of the ERA bill, homosexual adoptions, gay/lesbian movement, Reverend Mooneyham, moral majority, welfare, the women's movement, rising divorce rate, etc.

DVD #58, "Fitzgerald conservatives #2, 1981"

Continuing footage of the interview with "North Carolinians Against ERA." They discuss the definition of "the family," abortion, the history of the women's movement, opposition to Betty Friedan and Gloria Steinem, gender roles, support of the "Protect the Family" Act, etc.

DVD #59, "Fitzgerald conservatives #3. 1981"

Continuing footage of interview with "North Carolinians Against ERA," with the addition of Representative Poovey. They discuss the abolishment of the Status of Women Commissions, the ERA, state-funded abortions, and the "New Generation" Act. Other topics include pro-life legislation/ideology, and Representative Poovey says he believes "every mother should have to view the remains of her aborted child."

DVD #60, "Pat B at church #21, 1981"

Pat Blackstone explains the ERA (on behalf of the League of Women Votes) to an adult church group. She also gives a brief history of the women's rights movement and how it relates to the ERA and gives statistics about women in the workforce (nationally and within North Carolina), women's property rights and child custody/child support, etc.

DVD #61, "Pat B at church #22, 1981"

Continuing footage of Pat Blackstone explaining the ERA to a church group. Pat answers questions from, and debates with, members of the audience (mostly men). Topics include judicial interpretations, gender roles within the military, the draft, etc.

DVD #62, "Pat B at church #23, 1981"

Continuing footage of Pat Blackstone explaining the ERA to a church group. Topics include the military, domestic violence/rape, Phyllis Schlafly, etc. Footage then shifts to various outdoor shots.

DVD #63, "Settle's Christian graduation, #20"

More footage of Chris Settle's graduation from his Christian high school (Tabernacle Christian School). Footage includes a speech from the president of the senior class, and speeches from eight other graduating seniors (not including Chris Settle).

DVD #64, "Settle teens and town CA's #18, n.d."

Chris Settle and Jamie, the valedictorian, discuss their views on the ERA, abortion, humanism, their plans for the future and personal philosophies/principles, and women's roles in society. Footage then shifts to various outdoor shots of Hickory, North Carolina.

DVD #65, "NC Hickory #19, 1981"

Pat Blackstone talks in her kitchen while she cooks dinner. She discusses her background/upbringing, why she became involved with the ERA, her reactions to her visit to the Ridgeview Mills hosiery factory, grassroots organizing, her relationship to the League of Women Voters of Catawba County (President), and begins talking about her friend Phyllis.

DVD #66, "Pat B at home and cutaways"

Pat Blackstone and her husband Paul talk in their home about the family, women in the workplace, federally funded social services (and upcoming cutbacks), Paul's personal views on the ERA, and Pat and Paul answer the question "who will protect the family?"

DVD #67, "Family Raleigh #4"

*DVD may experience technical difficulties.

Continuing footage of "North Carolinians Against ERA" being repositioned in various poses. Footage then shifts to Senator Craig Lawing answering questions about his support for the ERA, his predictions for the future of the ERA, Senator Helms, pro- vs. anti-ERA movements, etc.

DVD #68, "Fitzgerald - Beth Raliegh [Raleigh] #10, 1981"

Beth McAllister discusses Marilyn DeVries, her life experiences/upbringing, her ERA opponents, the civil rights/women's movements, the politics surrounding the bill, the history of the ERA in North Carolina, the political tactics/attitudes of ERA supporters, Pat Blackstone, the low economic status of women in North Carolina (56% of women in the workforce). Other topics include abortion, affirmative action, the history of segregation, homosexuality, the New Right, and misinformation about the ERA.

DVD #69, "Fitzgerald - Miriam, Beth, Raliegh [Raleigh] #7, 1981"

Beth McAllister and Miriam Dorsey, the director of the North Carolina Council on the Status of Women (NCCSW), discuss the need for the protections of the ERA against the Reagan administration and cultural changes. Miriam also explains her role as the director of the NCCSW. Beth and Frances Fitzgerald talk about various topics. Beth introduces herself as the North Carolina ERA coordinator, the president of the North Carolinian Junior League for ERA, and a wife and mother. Beth also describes her personal history and her reasons for becoming involved in the pro-ERA movement, her education, and her similarities/differences to Marilyn DeVries.

DVD #70, "Fitzgerald - Miriam, Beth Raliegh [Raleigh] #8, 1981"

Continuing footage of Beth McAllister and Miriam Dorsey. Dorsey discusses the priorities of the North Carolina Council on the Status of Women, such as the ERA, equitable distribution of property, and state funding for abortions for low-income women. She also talks about the changing roles of men and women in society, the women's movement, the need for increasing support and assistance for sexual abuse victims, the Family Protection Act, the current political climate (state and national), the need for more government-funded social services, and legislative support for the ERA.

DVD #71, "Fitzgerald - Raliegh [Raleigh] #6, 1981"

Senator Rachel Gray and Representative Louise Brennan answer questions about the history of the ERA in the North Carolinian General Assembly, their hopes for the future of the ERA, the current conservative/"authoritarian" political climate of national politics, and the budget.

DVD #72, "Fitzgerald - Raliegh [Raleigh] #7, 1981"

Footage of film crew member Frances Fitzgerald asking questions/creating additional footage to be added to her interview with Alice Winn Gatsis.

DVD #73, "Lamarr's [Lamar's] church/sermon #20, 1981"

Reverend Lamar Mooneyham gives a sermon at his church, the "Tri-City Baptist Temple" on Father's Day. The sermon is directed at fatherhood, and Mooneyham leads his congregation in the singing of various hymns. Footage then shifts to an interview with Mooneyham. He discusses his political participation with the moral majority/local grassroots movement, textbooks and the faults of the public school system, the presentation of "life as it ought to be" rather than "life as it is" to schoolchildren, and anti-pornography and anti-obscenity legislation, and sex education.

DVD #74, "Lamarr's [Lamar] church/sermon #21, 1981"

Continuing footage of Reverend Mooneyham's sermon, addressed particularly to men and "how God evaluates the man." The Bible is described as the ultimate authority in describing roles of men, women and the family. Mooneyham cites that, at present, the divorce rate of 55% has negative effects on the nation (politically, socially, and economically). ERA is perceived as a by-product of the "failures of husbands and fathers."

DVD #75, "Lamarr's [Lamar] Church/sermon #22, 1981"

Continuing footage of Reverend Mooneyham's sermon on the roles of men and women. He discusses the meaning of marriage in relation to God/the Bible, presented, against a backdrop of high divorce rates and dissolving families. According to this interpretation of the Bible, God can fix all familial problems. After the sermon, church members are shown talking to Mooneyham. One of the discussion topics concerns starting church daycare, as per Senate-supported legislation.

DVD #76, "Lamarr's [Lamar] Church/sermon #23, 1981"

Continuing footage of Reverend Mooneyham's interview, where he answers the question, "who will protect the family?" ("Families will protect families"). Footage then shifts to Frances Fitzgerald and Miriam Dorsey talking to a small group of women about the North Carolinian domestic violence program.

DVD #77, "Family - Raleigh #13, 1981"

Frances Fitzgerald interviews Marilyn DeVries. Discussion topics include the history of the anti-ERA campaign, the nuclear family, her involvement with Alice Winn Gatsis and Senator Helms, the NOW book "Revolution: Tomorrow is NOW," the religious-based forefathers of the United States, and her religious and personal background.

DVD #78, "Fitzgerald-Family - Raleigh #14, 1981"

Continuing footage of the Marilyn DeVries interview. She discusses the "women's lib movement" in contrast to her ideas about the home and the church, her opinion that receiving the Lord has nothing to do with ERA, the economic crisis, and women working outside of the home. She asserts that it is important to spend time with children and family and to teach family values and morals, not work outside of the home.

DVD #79, "Fitzgerald--Family - Raleigh #15, 1981"

Continuing footage of the Marilyn DeVries interview. She answers the questions, "who are you?" and "who will protect the family?" Other discussion topics include daycare centers as a government control and the fundamentalist Christian concerns about Christ-centered ethics being removed from schools. She also discusses "reverse discrimination" and affirmative action as well as racial justice as a moral value. Other topics include the equitable distribution of property bill, "alternate lifestyles," domestic violence, and the "liberal sentiment" of newspapers and the media.

DVD #80, "Family - Raleigh, #16, 1981"

Continuing footage of the Marilyn DeVries interview. Frances Fitzgerald poses various questions but footage does not include Marilyn's answers.

DVD #81, "Family - Raleigh #19, 1981"

Shots of African-American children at a playground and then of African-American families at a park, and then African-American families at a park. The second half of the DVD shows Reverend Mooneyham's congregation singing hymns.

DVD #82, "Battered women shelter, #24, 1981"

Frances Fitzgerald and Miriam Dorsey interview a group of women at a domestic violence shelter in North Carolina. Topics include their children, experiences with law enforcement, responses to the notion that battered women can overcome spousal abuse if they are more submissive to their husbands, reasons that men abuse their wives, the cycle of violence, and answer the question, "who will protect the family?"

DVD #83, "Fitzgerald Beth reverses #12, 1981"

Footage of Frances Fitzgerald posing questions to add to earlier footage of her interview of Beth McAllister.

DVD #84, "Family--Fitzgerald - Beth #11, 1981"

Frances Fitzgerald interviews Beth McAllister, specifically focusing on Pat Blackstone and her involvement in the League of Women Voters and ERA education as it relates to grassroots education and organizing in Catawba County, North Carolina. Other topics include abortion, economic issues, daycare and education, social programs, juvenile justice, welfare, the fair employment bill, "equal pay for equal work," and property laws.

DVD #85, "Allsbrook after Senate, NC State legislature, 1979"

Senator Allsbrook discusses the North Carolina Constitutional Amendments Committee's actions concerning the ERA. The press asks Allsbrook questions about the committee process and procedure, his personal views on the ERA, and his motivations for bringing the bill to a vote before the General Assembly. An unidentified woman talks about water conservation, reservoirs, drought, and the history of water supplies in California.

DVD #86, "Anti-ERA rally, 14 year old speech; 2 interviews with anti ERA folk, n.d."

An anti-ERA rally takes place outside of the North Carolina Legislature. Fourteen-year old Lisa Kazmirczak from Carroll Junior High gives a speech explaining her reasons for being anti-ERA and encouraging junior high and high school female students to attend anti-ERA rallies. She then answers questions from the press as to how and why the girls were organized, why they mobilized girls and not boys, and the involvement of the Girl Scouts and the Fayetteville Church adult group. Next, a group of anti-ERA women discuss their reasons for opposing the bill. Other footage includes interviews with various ERA opponents, including anti-ERA protestors outside of the NC Legislature. The DVD concludes with a brief interview with a supporter of the ERA.

DVD #87, "Sen. Wichard; Sen. Cecil Hill; Senate floor, n.d."

The North Carolina Constitutional Committee addresses Senator Robert Davis' absence from a previous meeting and the subsequent process of a re-vote concerning the ERA bill. The Judiciary Committee is shown meeting to discuss a substitute motion proposed by Senator Allsbrook to discuss the ERA at another meeting next week. The University of North Carolina television station reports on the Senate Committee vote on the ERA, Senator Walter Cockerham's ERA survey, and shows other footage of the legislature's actions concerning the ERA.

DVD #88, "ERA Rally Washington, D.C. June 30, 1981"

A pro-ERA rally in Washington, D.C. includes pro-ERA songs, and speeches by a NOW representative and Alan Alda. Others demonstrating include Beth McAllister and Sonya Quinn.

DVD #89, "ERA Rally Washington, D.C., Roll 2, June 30, 1981"

Continuing footage of the pro-ERA rally in Washington, D.C. A NOW representative finishes her speech. Arlene Alda (wife of Alan Alda) gives a speech, and various labor union representatives give speeches, including the AFL-CIO and the Communication Workers of America. A member of the Democratic National Party also voices his support for the ERA and questions the Republicans' opposition to the bill.

DVD #90, "ERA Rally Washington, D.C., Roll 3, June 30, 1981"

Continuing footage of the pro-ERA rally in Washington, D.C. Footage includes more speeches in support of the ERA and the performance of a pro-ERA song. Lynn Cutler calls for the first national vigil in favor of the ERA and discusses the ERA in terms of religion and the Bible. The president of the National Federation of Priests' Councils gives a speech in which he says that the priests voted by a 96% majority to support the ERA. Beth McAllister and her friend Jackie discuss the history of the ERA in the North Carolina legislature and the future of the bill.

DVD #91, "ERA Rally Washington, D.C., tape 4, June 30, 1981"

Continuing footage of Beth McAllister, Miriam Dorsey, and Jackie at the pro-ERA rally in Washington, D.C. They discuss the attitudes of anti-ERA legislators, the inclusion of minority women in the women's rights movement nationally and in North Carolina, their individual roles within the movement, the Reagan administration, "the feminization of poverty," the Family Protection Act, etc.

DVD #92, "ERA Rally Washington, D.C., Roll 5, June 30, 1981"

Continuing footage of Beth McAllister, Miriam Dorsey, and Jackie at the pro-ERA rally in Washington, D.C. They discuss the Women's Political Caucus, conservative politician Richard Viguerie, Virginia's fight for the ERA, the ERA Candlelight Vigil, etc. Footage then shifts to CBS news coverage of the Reagan-Carter election.

DVD #93, "ERA Rally Washington, D.C., Roll 7, June 30, 1981"

This footage is misidentified and is not the ERA rally. A woman is interviewed about the various reasons why people vote (or do not vote), such as family voting traditions, the difficulty of registration mobility, and frustration over the state of national affairs. She also discusses the Reagan-Carter election rather in-depth, including the demographics of each candidate's supporters, the role of the media, each candidate's major ideologies, etc.

DVD #94, "ERA Press conference, tape 1 of 2, June 17/18, 1981"

At a press conference in the North Carolina Legislature, Beth McAllister and Lynn Cutler give pro-ERA speeches. Topics include the actions and successes of the various North Carolina pro-ERA groups, the national Democratic Party's views on the ERA, Governor James Hunt's support for the ERA, and the need for the ERA's ratification.

DVD #95, "ERA Press conference, tape 2 of 2, June 17/18, 1981"

Continuing footage of the North Carolina Legislature press conference. Beth McAllister and Lynn Cutler answer questions from the press. Topics include the 1981 legislative session, the goal for the ratification of the ERA in North Carolina by 1982, and Governor Hunt's support for the ERA. Filming then shifts to a North Carolinian legislative committee's discussion of an energy bill, proposed by Governor Hunt.

DVD #96, "Kessee on ERA, 1981"

Footage shows North Carolina Republican Representative Margaret P. Kessee-Forrester discussing the ERA at a press conference. Topics include redistricting, the possibility of ERA ratification, and the history of the women's rights movement. Filming then shifts to a press conference with Governor James Hunt. Topics include the state's budget and the status of various bills. Beth McAllister's speech at the press conference, in which she introduces Lynn Cutler is also shown (similar to DVD #95 footage).

DVD #97, "ERA Legislative proceedings, Raleigh, NC, 1979"

Senate legislative proceedings regarding the ERA. Filming then shifts to an interview with Representative Jack Stevens. He discusses the past, present, and future of the ERA. Senate legislative proceedings regarding the ERA continue.

DVD #98, "ERA Constitutional Amendment Committee, February 15, 1979"

Senator Davis explains a bill pertaining to a simple word change in the NC Constitution. Senator Alexander proposes to kill the ERA bill in committee ("give it an unfavorable report"), and Senator Rachel Gray challenges him, thus sparking a discussion and debate among the various senators.

DVD #99, "Family Protection Act PC#1, June 17, 1981"

Republican Senator Roger Jepsen from Iowa and Republican Senator Paul Laxalt from Nevada discuss their sponsorship of and commitment to the Family Protection Act at a banquet reception in Washington, D.C. Representative Smith also gives a speech in support of the Family Protection Act.

DVD #100, "Press Conference Family Protection Act, tape 3, June 17, 1981"

Senator Jepsen, Senator Laxalt, and Representative Smith answer questions about the Family Protection Act. Topics include how the bill relates to the ERA, the moral decay of the family, the effects of radical feminism on the country, secular humanism, and the decline of religious education in the schools. Representative Smith and his wife answer more questions about the bill (especially in reference to feminism, sex education, and the ERA).

DVD #101, "Anti pornography/obscenity, Raleigh NC, tape 1, June 5, 1981"

A subcommittee of the North Carolina Senate discusses a proposed anti-pornography/obscenity bill (Senate Bill 295). The senators discuss, debate, and read various statements for and against the proposed bill.

DVD #102, "Anti pornography/obscenity, Raleigh NC, tape 2, June 5, 1981"

A subcommittee of the North Carolina House of Representatives discusses a proposed anti-pornography/obscenity bill (Senate Bill 295). A lawyer for the Motion Picture Association of America, a representative of the public libraries of North Carolina association, a lawyer for a videotape company, a lawyer for a periodical association, a representative for the North Carolina Civil Liberties Union, and Senator Jordan, on behalf of the association of theaters of North Carolina, read statements in opposition to the bill. Filming then shifts to a committee meeting on a referendum regarding a bill about the legal age for purchasing/drinking alcohol. The DVD concludes with footage of the North Carolina House of Representatives.

DVD #103, "NOW march, 1978"

Footage shows a 1978 pro-ERA rally, including ERA songs, speeches, and various groups of women discussing their views and experiences concerning the ERA and the women's rights movement.

DVD #104, "NOW march, tape 2, 1978"

*Video stops at 8:20-minute mark; country folk music plays for the remainder of the time.

An ERA supporter from Virginia, Laurabelle Yoder, meets with Democratic U.S. Representative David E. Satterfield, III (D-Virginia). They discuss Senator Sam Ervin, misconceptions about the ERA, and Satterfield's views on the potential seven-year extension. After their meeting, Yoder cries in frustration and explains to another ERA supporter how the meeting went.

DVD #105, "Excerpt, Abortion show, 1979"

Excerpts from a T.V. show on abortion, focusing on the religious aspects; interviews with various religious leaders.

DVD #106, "Phyllis Schlafly; anti ERA group, October 4, n.d."

A conversation with a group of anti-ERA supporters from Texas in the U.S. Senate in Washington, D.C. Phyllis Schlafly Is interviewed about her anti-ERA views, her belief that the media is biased in favor of pro-ERA advocates, her personal reasons for becoming active in the anti-ERA movement, the demographics of the anti-ERA movement, her home state of Illinois, the monetary contributions of STOP ERA, and her relationship to the Mormon Church.

DVD #107, "End of Phyllis Schlafly; anti ERA group, October 4, n.d."

Continuing footage of Phyllis Schlafly interview. She discusses the personal sacrifices she has made for the movement, her profession as a writer, the role of minority women in the anti-ERA movement, and the various negative effects she believes will result from the ERA. A group of STOP ERA women from Virginia discuss their personal views on the ERA and the state of the bill in Virginia.

DVD #108, "Bowl-A-Thon #1, n.d."

*Sound stops working at the 5-minute mark.

A group of women bowl for a Richmond NOW ERA fundraiser in Richmond, Virginia, led by Laurabelle Yoder.

DVD #109, "Bowl-A-Thon #2, n.d."

Continuing footage of the Richmond NOW ERA bowling fundraiser in Richmond, Virginia. The organizer of the fundraiser, Laurabelle Yoder, discusses her correspondence with Virginia Representative Satterfield regarding the ERA.

DVD #110, "Bowl-A-Thon #3, n.d."

Continuing footage of the Richmond NOW ERA bowling fundraiser in Richmond, Virginia on August 26, "Women's Equality Day." The organizer of the fundraiser, Laurabelle Yoder, discusses her personal dedication to the pro-ERA movement, the arrest of Jean Marshall Clark, Robert's Rules of Order, and upcoming events. Laurabelle Yoder then interviews Congressman James about his predictions for the future of the ERA in Virginia.

DVD #111, "Who Will Protect the Family? by Victoria Costello, 1981"

This is the edited, final version of "Who Will Protect the Family?" narrated by Reporter Frances Fitzgerald.

DVD #112, "Thea Barrow interview, part 1, 1979"

Thea Barrow, a prominent lawyer, is interviewed by Marie Torre. Topics include her anti-abortion stance, her relationship to the "Right to Life" movement, the "New Right," and single-issue politics.

DVD #113, "Thea Barrow interview, part 2, 1979"

Continuing footage of the Thea Barrow interview with Marie Torre. They reshoot various questions for the final cut.

DVD #114, "Thea Barrow interview, 1979"

Continuing footage of the Thea Barrow interview with Marie Torre. They reshoot various questions for the final cut. Topics include the "New Right," abortion vs. child abuse, and her departure from the "Right to Life" movement.

DVD #115, "Midge Costanza interview, n.d."

An interview with Margaret ("Midge") Costanza, President Jimmy Carter's Assistant to the President for Public Liaison. Topics include her reactions to Phyllis Schlafly's attitudes about the ERA, the issue of homosexuality and the ERA, equal pay for equal work, the effects of the ERA on the family, the ERA ratification extension, her resignation from her White House position, etc. Filming then shifts to the National NOW Action Center, where NOW activists are meeting and discussing plans with one another.

DVD #116, "Richmond, VA, pre march, 1978"

Laurabelle Yoder, her husband Reverend Larry Yoder, and their son Marcus, are interviewed in their home in Richmond, Virginia. Topics include Laurabelle's teaching career, Larry's job within the Baptist Church, Laurabelle's Baptist minister father, liberal Baptists, stereotypes about Baptists, Baptists and ERA, religion and feminism, "women's lib," public education, their interpretations of the Bible, Virginia elections, and the motivations of anti-ERA activists.

DVD #117, "Richmond, VA, pre march 2, 1978"

Continuing footage of the Yoder family. Topics include lobbying Representative Satterfield and why Laurabelle believes we need the ERA. Laurabelle's father and mother then join the discussion, and eventually Larry and Laurabelle's friend Chris arrives at the house. Laurabelle's father discusses his views on gender roles, his religious views, and his opinion on his daughter's political views.

DVD #118, "Richmond, VA, evening #3, 1978"

Continuing footage of the Yoder family. Topics include the coherence of the family, their opinions on the ERA, religion, the Southern Baptist church, and female pastors, the rise of the conservative movement, Phyllis Schlafly, and the pros and cons of the ERA.

DVD #119 "Larry Yoder Interview"

Footage of Mr. Yoder

DVD #120, "Excerpts from ERA: A family matter; ERA for Better or Worse; Abortion; right to Live vs. Right to Choose; None of the Above, n.d."

The first half of the DVD contains miscellaneous clips of subject matter already covered in the other DVDs, such as the ERA March on Washington, Laurabelle Yoder, and clips from "ERA: A Family Matter," produced and directed by Victoria Costello (featuring the Yoder family and Laurabelle Yoder's fight for the ERA). There is also footage of Beth McAllister; anti-ERA protests in Raleigh, North Carolina; Marilyn DeVries and Alice Winn Gatsis at the WPJL radio station; and Gloria Steinem. The second half of the DVD is a PBS broadcast hosted by Marie Torre, entitled "Abortion: Right to Life vs. Right to Choose."

DVD #121, "NOW March #12, 1978"

Footage from the NOW March on Washington, D.C. in 1978. Speeches by various women cover the ERA and women's equality, equal pay for equal work/economic equality, the role of minority women within the movement, President Jimmy Carter's support of the ERA and equal rights for women, National ERA Lobbying Day, Phyllis Schlafly, and Congress' ERA extension. Speakers include Patricia Roberts Harris, Midge Costanza, and Eleanor Smeal.

DVD #122, "NOW March #13, 1978"

Continuing footage from the NOW March on Washington, D.C. in 1978. Gloria Steinem gives a speech in which she talks about the history of the women's and civil rights movements, suffrage, Second Wave feminism, and inequitable pay distribution.

DVD #123, "NOW March #16, 1978"

Continuing footage from the NOW March on Washington, D.C. in 1978.

Laurabelle Yoder and her daughter are filmed in the crowd, talking to various protestors, including older ERA supporters.

Fighting for the Obvious:

DVD #1, "Fighting for the Obvious: Peggy Madigan interview, #1, n.d."

Interview with Peggy Madigan, a volunteer organizer for the Chicago NOW chapter. She discusses the effects of the women's rights movement on her family, the departure from her financial career, what the ERA means for women who are not involved in the struggle, the resistance of the Republican Party and President Reagan to grant women their rights and their fight against the ERA, and how the women's movement might react to the potential defeat of the ERA.

DVD #2, "Fighting for the Obvious: Peggy Madigan interview, #2," n.d.

Continuing footage of the interview with Peggy Madigan. She discusses her reasons for joining NOW, her roles and duties as a NOW volunteer organizer, her attitude towards other women working on the ERA campaign, why the ERA might fail, her experiences lobbying at the Springfield (Illinois) Capitol, and her feelings about the American political system.

DVD #3, "Fighting for the Obvious: Peggy Madigan interview, #3," n.d.

Continuing footage of the interview with Peggy Madigan. She discusses the lessons that the ERA will teach American men and women, the participation of men within the ERA movement, the similarities between the anti-Vietnam war movement and the women's movement, and her future within the women's movement after the fight for ERA.

DVD #4, "Fighting For the Obvious:" Carol Swinney interview, #1," n.d.

Interview with Carol Swinney, the Outreach Coordinator at NOW. She discusses her responsibilities at NOW and the ERA Countdown Office, which include informing the community about the ERA, writing editorials and letters to the editor of various publications, and mobilizing various women's groups around ERA. Swinney also mentions which women's groups she finds most helpful in the fight for ERA (Coalition of Labor Union Women, Women Employed, UAW). Other topics include the cooperation of the labor movement and the potential failure of the ERA.

DVD #5, "Fighting For the Obvious:" Carol Swinney interview, #2," n.d.

*Carol Swinney footage ends at the 12-minute mark. The last four minutes show pictures of various ERA advocates.

Continuing footage of the interview with Carol Swinney. She discusses how she deals with tension and struggles between NOW and various other organizations, how long she's been involved in the ERA campaign and why she joined the struggle, and the concerns she has for future generations (including her daughter).

DVD #6, "Fighting For the Obvious:" Carol Swinney interview, #3," n.d.

Continuing footage of the interview with Carol Swinney. She discusses how she overcomes discouragement, the most frustrating part of her job, her greatest accomplishment on the ERA campaign, her most memorable experiences working on the campaign, her work with Illinois Republican Lieutenant Governor candidate Susan Catania, and the implications of the ERA's potential failure.

DVD #7, "Fighting For the Obvious:" Carol Swinney interview, #4 [#7]," n.d.

Continuing footage of the interview with Carol Swinney. She discusses the difficulty in raising children within the current political and social climate, the future of grassroots political organizing, the intersectionality of the various social movements (Civil Rights, Women's, etc.), "Solidarity Day," the future of the women's rights movement after the ERA struggle, and her personal struggles and motivations as an African-American woman.

DVD #8, "Fighting for the Obvious: Mary Brandon interview, #1 [#8]," n.d.

Interview with Mary Brandon, a work coordinator for the Chicago NOW chapter. She discusses her decision to work for NOW, her educational qualifications, her visit to the Springfield Capitol, and her opinions on politicians.

DVD #9, "Fighting for the Obvious: Mary Brandon interview, #2 [#9]," n.d.

*The last three minutes shows a picture of a NOW protest.

Continuing footage of the interview with Mary Brandon. She discusses her speculations as to why the ERA might fail, how women will react if the ERA does not pass, what she has learned from the ERA campaign, the future of the women's rights movement, and the anti-women policies of the Reagan administration.

DVD #10, "Fighting for the Obvious, Linda Miller NOW meeting re: student lobby day, #11," n.d.

Interview with Linda Miller, the co-director of the ERA Countdown Campaign. She discusses her nine-year involvement with NOW, her current responsibilities at NOW, the evolution of NOW and the women's movement, the resistance of the Republican Party, her reactions to various male politicians' attitudes towards NOW activists, and NOW's strategies for passing ERA.

DVD #11, "Fighting for the Obvious, Springfield #3, Linda Miller NOW interview, #12," n.d.

Continuing footage of the interview with Linda Miller. She discusses how her personal life has changed as a result of her involvement with NOW, the reactions of various legislators to NOW's ERA policies, her motivations for working so hard on the campaign, and her predictions for the future of the women's movement after the ERA.

DVD #12, "Fighting for the Obvious, Springfield #4,Linda Miller interview, #13, n.d."

Continuing footage of the interview with Linda Miller. She discusses the lessons that the women's movement has learned from the ERA campaign, why she believes there is so much resistance to the ERA, and how she became involved with the women's movement.

DVD #13, "Fighting for the Obvious: Kathy Railsback interview, #14, n.d."

Interview with Kelly Railsback, a member of the Springfield NOW chapter. She discusses NOW's battle with Illinois Republic Senator Forrest Etheridge.

DVD #14, "Fighting for the Obvious: Kathy Railsback interview, #15, n.d."

Continuing footage of the interview with Kathy Railsback. She discusses the Illinois 3/5-rule change legislation, and a detailed account of her meeting with Illinois Republican Senator Forrest Etheridge on his potential vote against the ERA.

DVD #15, "Fighting for the Obvious: Wilma Scott Heide interview, #16, n.d."

Interview with Wilma Scott Heide. She discusses how she came to be a feminist; how she disrupted the Senate Subcommittee on Constitutional Amendments on February 17, 1970; the most important things that the feminist movement has learned from the ERA struggle; and the biggest achievements of the feminist movement in the last fifteen years.

DVD #16, Fighting for the Obvious: Wilma Scott Heide interview, #17, n.d."

Continuing footage of the interview with Wilma Scott Heide. She discusses the history of civil disobedience within the women's movement and the ERA struggle, her opinions on the American political system, and how the women's movement has changed since the mid-1960s.

DVD #17, Fighting for the Obvious: Wilma Scott Heide interview, #18, n.d."

Continuing footage of the interview with Wilma Scott Heide. She discusses why the ERA might fail, why she believes the ERA won't fail, the problems with the mass media and how it has failed the women's movement, how to rally if the ERA fails, how she stays motivated and why all women should stay motivated.

DVD #18, Fighting for the Obvious: Wilma Scott Heide interview, #19, n.d."

Continuing footage of the interview with Wilma Scott Heide. She discusses feminism's definitions of male and female, what would happen if the values of feminism were applied to public policy, and how feminism affirms men and women as whole.

DVD #19, "Fighting for the Obvious: Wilma Scott Heide interview, #20, n.d."

Continuing silent footage of Wilma Scott Heide, showing her walking, talking to the interviewer, etc.

DVD #20, "Fighting for the Obvious: Interview with Rep. Donald Deuster (anti-ERA), #21, n.d."

Interview with Illinois Representative Donald Deuster. He discusses his beliefs that the ERA is harmful to women, his opinion of "equal pay for equal work" and the Fourteenth Amendment, how his anti-ERA stance affected his political career and personal life, why he believes the ERA will fail, and his oppositional strategies.

DVD #21, "Fighting for the Obvious: Interview with Rep. Donald Deuster (anti-ERA), #22, n.d."

Continuing footage of the interview with Representative Donald Deuster. He discusses what the ERA would change, Gerald and Betty Ford's opinions on the ERA, the labor leaders' initial opposition to the ERA, the most effective tactics in stopping the ERA (including associating it with homosexuality and abortion), and the pro-ERA media bias.

DVD #22, "Fighting for the Obvious: Interview with Rep. Donald Deuster (anti-ERA), #23, n.d."

Continuing footage of the interview with Representative Donald Deuster. He discusses his personal reactions to the Illinois ERA campaign, what he believes are the strongest and weakest elements of the pro-ERA campaign in Illinois (the mayor's involvement), and how he feels about the men and women who have been fighting on both sides of the ERA issue.

DVD #23, "Fighting for the Obvious: Interview with Rep. Donald Deuster (anti-ERA), #24, n.d."

Continuing footage of the interview with Representative Donald Deuster. He discusses his respect for the pro-ERA campaign, the rights women have lost as a result of the courts (i.e. divorce), his views on maternity/paternity leave, and why he believes the ERA will not pass ("because the people don't want it"). Footage then shows photographs of the Deuster family. Two ERA supporters discussing police brutality and intimidation against demonstrators, and the Grassroots Group of Second Class Citizens.

"Then the proponents came down with roses, so on the floor of the House, everybody who voted for ERA would get a rose, and that's a very feminine thing - to show that they're not lesbians and homosexuals, or they don't hate men; they're full of love and affection; they bring us roses." - Representative Donald Deuster

DVD #24, "Fighting for the Obvious: Linda Miller NOW meeting re: student rally day #10," n.d.

Footage shows Linda Miller and other NOW members discussing plans and tactics for their student activists' rally day at the Springfield legislature.

DVD #25, "Fighting for the Obvious: Lunatic Fringe, Alice and Bernice #25, n.d."

Interview with Bernice (?) She discusses the potential outcomes of the ERA's failure, the way the media portrays the women's movement, the tactics and strategies of the ERA movement, the women who fast in support of the ERA, and the ratification process. The last seven minutes of film shows various antique photographs.

DVD #26, "Fighting for the Obvious: Lunatic Fringe, Alice and Bernice #26, n.d."

Interview with Alice (?) She discusses the sit-in she organized and participated in at the Illinois Senate building, their subsequent police removal, and their singing of "We Shall Not Be Moved."

DVD #27, "Fighting for the Obvious: Anne Courtney interview #27, 1982"

Footage begins with Anne Courtney and Clara Johnston sitting on a front porch and walking down the street together. Footage then shifts to Anne Courtney discussing her involvement in the women's movement since 1973, her leadership of her local Illinois NOW chapter and ERA coalition, how she became a feminist, her involvement with Betty Freidan, what ratification struggle has taught her, and why so many women have been so highly committed to the fight for the ERA.

DVD #28, "Fighting for the Obvious: Anne Courtney interview #28, 1982"

Continuing footage of the interview with Anne Courtney. She discusses the painful lessons the ERA fight has taught her, her friendships with other feminists, the manipulative nature of legislators, and what about the ERA struggle makes her angriest.

DVD #29, "Fighting for the Obvious: Anne Courtney interview #29," 1982

*Sound does not work from the 3-minute to the 5-minute mark.

Continuing footage of Anne Courtney. She discusses the worst experience she ever had while lobbying a legislator. Footage then shifts to an interview with Clara Johnston. She explains how long she has worked on the ERA campaign, what made her realize the fight for the ERA was so important, why she believes politicians don't take the ERA seriously, the thing that makes her angriest about the ERA struggle, and how pained it makes her to think that she will never live in a society where women are equal to men under the Constitution.

DVD #30, "Fighting for the Obvious: Clara Johnston interview #30," 1982

Continuing footage of Clara Johnston. She discusses examples of sexism she has experienced at her job, her experiences with Prescott Bloom (a Senator from her district; R-Peoria), what she believes has motivated so many women to fight for the ERA, what keeps her fighting year after year, and what she believes will happen to the women's movement if the ERA is not ratified.

DVD #31, "Fighting for the Obvious: Clara Johnston interview #31, 1982"

Interview with Clara Johnston. She discusses the main differences between anti- and pro-ERA women, why anti-ERA women make her so angry, how to channel the anger that will result from the ERA's defeat, the best thing she has learned from the struggle for ERA, why women's rights are commonly ignored by male activists, and why it will be impossible for women to return to a mindset prior to the ERA struggle.

DVD #32, "Fighting for the Obvious: Students on the bus #32," n.d.

Footage shows students on a bus ride to Springfield to protest and lobby at the Illinois legislature. Older NOW members, including Debbie Harvey, instruct the students on how to approach and address legislators, strategies for forming and presenting their arguments, and the history of the ERA and women's rights struggle.

DVD #33, "Fighting for the Obvious: Students on the bus #33,"n.d.

*Video does not work from 4:08-minute mark to 5:40-minute mark.

Footage of student lobbyists on a bus to Springfield practicing their presentations. NOW members give the students advice on how to talk to the legislators. Footage then shows the students outside of the legislative building and inside, talking to various legislators.

DVD #34, "Fighting for the Obvious: Student rally #34," n.d.

Continuing footage of the NOW/student bus ride to Springfield. NOW members give the students more advice on how to handle anti-ERA legislators.

DVD #35, "Fighting for the Obvious: Student rally #35," n.d.

*Sound does not work from the 4:30 mark to the 6:35 mark, 7:20 to 7:50

Footage shows students from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana and Eastern Illinois University. The students discuss their strategies for approaching legislators, the problems with the 3/5 rule, and which politicians specifically to target. The footage then shifts to the rally at the legislature.

DVD #36, "Fighting for the Obvious: Student rally #36," n.d.

*Sound does not work until the 9:35-minute mark.

Footage shows ERA supporters and protestors in the Illinois legislature. Dr. Dale, a professor at Illinois State University, and Illinois Representative Susan Catania (R) give speeches in support of the ERA and women's rights. Catania's speech includes Canada's constitutional equal rights clause and the history of the Illinois women's movement.

DVD #37, "Fighting for the Obvious: Student rally #37," n.d.

Continuing footage of Representative Susan Catania's speech at the Illinois legislature. Other speakers include Jeannie Morris, TV sports reporter/CBS correspondent, Mary Jean Collins, co-director of the NOW ERA campaign, and Monica Faith Stewart, State Representative from Chicago's 29th district, gives a speech urging young women to continue to be politically involved.

DVD #38, "Fighting for the Obvious: Student rally #38," n.d.

Footage of a pro-ERA rally. Representative John Donne (D) and Senator James Taylor give speeches urging the ERA supporters to let the governor know how they feel. Representative Barbara Flynn-Curry also criticizes Illinois Governor Thompson

DVD #39, "Fighting for the Obvious: Student rally #39," n.d.

*Video does not work until the 1:34-minute mark.

DVD includes much of the same footage as DVD #37. More footage of pro-ERA songs. Also, Mary Jean Collins urges the audience (mostly students) to help with the ERA Countdown Campaign.

DVD #40, "Fighting for the Obvious: Monica's Student Interview #40," n.d.

Partially repeated footage from DVD #39. More pro-ERA songs (same as those featured on DVD #38). Footage then shifts to two young women outside of the legislature explaining why the support the ERA.

DVD #41, "Fighting for the Obvious: Students on the bus #41," n.d.

Continuing footage from DVD #40. More interviews with young women about why they are at the legislature fighting for the ERA, their attitudes towards the legislators and their experiences interacting with them. The DVD ends footage of the activists boarding the bus, then shows them sharing their positive and negative experiences at the legislature.

DVD #42, "Fighting for the Obvious: Students on the bus #42," n.d.

Continuing footage of the student activists discussing their experiences speaking to elected officials at the legislature.

DVD #43, "Fighting for the Obvious: Students on the bus #43," n.d.

Continuing footage of DVDs #42 and #43; student activists on their way home from the Illinois legislature.

DVD #44, "Fighting for the Obvious: Chicago phone bank re rally #44," n.d.

Footage of Marilyn Stuckey from the ERA Countdown Campaign calling people urging them to participate in the June 6th rally, or

DVD #45, "Fighting for the Obvious: IL NOW rally #45," n.d.

Footage shows NOW volunteers making signs and banners for the June 6th, 1982 ERA rally at the Illinois State House.

DVD #46, "Fighting for the Obvious: IL NOW rally #46," n.d.

Footage filmed at the Illinois NOW Headquarters. NOW members are shown calling people to ask them if they will be attending the June 6th rally, discussing plans for the June 6th rally, and discussing the sources of their monetary contributions.

DVD #47, "Fighting for the Obvious: IL NOW rally #47," n.d.

Continuing footage of the Illinois NOW Headquarters. Some NOW members discuss budget and expenses and others are shown painting signs and posters for the upcoming rally. The video is also interspersed with footage of a construction worker fixing the roof of a house.

DVD #48, "Fighting for the Obvious: Rebellion #48," n.d.

Footage shows the ERA rally at the Illinois State House. NOW members and other volunteers set up banners, check in guests and speakers, and discuss the agenda for the rally, and there are some group sing-a-longs in the lobby of the State House. The DVD also includes part of an interview with roofing workers.

DVD #49, "Fighting for the Obvious: Rebellion #49," n.d."

*Sound does not work from the 12:15-minute mark to the 13:15-minute mark.

Continuing footage of the IL State House rally. Various people give feminist and pro-ERA speeches to the crowd.

DVD #50, "Fighting for the Obvious: Rebellion #50," n.d.

Continuing footage of the rally. More speeches, sing-a-longs, including "We Shall Not Be Moved." Also, several of the protestors chain themselves together inside of the legislature.

DVD #51, "Fighting for the Obvious: Rebellion #51," n.d.

*Sound does not work from the 2:19-minute mark to the 12:03-minute mark.

Continuing footage of the rally. More singing in the Senate gallery of "We Shall Not Be Moved" and other protest songs. Protestors are also shown repeatedly chanting, "ERA Yes, 3/5 Now."

DVD #52, "Fighting for the Obvious: Rebellion #52," n.d.

Continuing footage of the rally. Once again, female protestors are shown chained together in protest. A woman named Jennifer Klindt discusses why she is a feminist, her sexual assault/rape at age sixteen, how she first become involved with activism, and the personal sacrifices she has had to make in order to participate in the fight for the ERA. The DVD ends with footage of carpenters working.

DVD #53, "Fighting for the Obvious: Jennifer Klindt interview #53," n.d.

Continuing footage of the interview with Jennifer Klindt. She discusses what she believes are the "sad" aspects of feminism, what she has learned from her activist work, and outlines some of the difficulties that women face as a result of feminism.

DVD #54, "Fighting for the Obvious: Jennifer Klindt interview #54," n.d.

*Sound stops working at the 15:30-minute mark.

More footage of the chained protestors in the Illinois legislature, singing protest songs, including "Bread and Roses." The DVD then shifts back to footage of Jennifer Klindt. She talks about her choice to work within the legislative system to try to enact change, the lobbying strategies of the pro-ERA movement, and her son's reaction to the ERA's defeat.

DVD #55, "Fighting for the Obvious: Fasters interview #55," 1982

*Audio and video stop working at the 14:30-minute mark.

Footage shows "Women Hunger for Justice" convened in the Illinois legislature, on Day #21 of their fast. One of the fasters expresses the group public statement they issued on their first day of fasting. Another woman talks about why female fasters are viewed as "inappropriate," what keeps them going, the power of fasting, what they have learned from the experience, and the message they would like to leave for posterity. The DVD ends with some brief footage of factory workers.

DVD #56, "Fighting for the Obvious: Fasters interview #56," 1982

Continuing footage of the "Women Hunger for Justice" interviews (still on Day #21 of their fast). They consider what lessons there are to be learned from the difficulties of the ERA struggle, how to focus on women's power, and how to challenge sexism. The DVD concludes with footage of anti-ERA demonstrators. The last :43 seconds is silent footage of a man doing wall construction.

DVD #57, "Fighting for the Obvious: Rally #57," 1982

Footage shows women at an Illinois pro-ERA march/rally, signing into a rally, getting off of buses, talking in small groups, singing songs, distributing buttons, and generally preparing for the march. Anne Courtney (leader of a local Illinois NOW chapter) is also included in the footage.

DVD #58, "Fighting for the Obvious: Rally #58," 1982

* Sound levels are consistently uneven.

Continuing footage of the Illinois pro-ERA march/rally. Clips of pro-ERA songs and pre-march announcements, then footage shifts to footage of the march itself. Someone mentions that there are an estimated 15,000 people at the march. (The last few seconds of the DVD show the roofing construction man).

DVD #59, "Fighting for the Obvious: Balcony, MJ Collins, Catania, Taylor, Smeal #59," 1982

Continuing footage of the march/rally. There are more songs and speeches, including remarks by Mary-Jean Collins, the co-director of NOW's Countdown Campaign, Illinois Representative Susan Catania, and NOW National President Ellie Smeal.

DVD #60, "Fighting for the Obvious: Smeal, Byrne, Ford #60," 1982

Continuing footage of the rally, including the end of Ellie Smeal's speech, a speech by Jane Byrne, Chicago's first female mayor of Chicago, and former First Lady Betty Ford.

DVD #61, "Fighting for the Obvious: Maureen #61," 1982

Continuing footage of the rally. Sister Maureen Fiedler gives a speech about the pro-ERA movement, their fasting, and the current status of the ERA bill.

DVD #62, "Fighting for the Obvious: Rally #62," 1982

Continuing footage of the rally. More of the fasters give speeches and public statements. "The Ballad of the ERA" and other songs are performed.

DVD #63, "Fighting for the Obvious: Rally #63," 1982

*Video does not work correctly from the :40-minute mark to the 1:18-minute mark.

*Sound does not work from the 3:50-minute mark to the 15:15-minute mark.

More songs are performed, including "This Little Light of Mine" and "We Will Never Give Up, We Will Never Give In." Video then shifts to silent footage of the fasters in the legislature (still day #21 of their fast). Paramedics attend to an ill faster and take her away on a stretcher. When the sound returns, there is a continuation of the song "We Will Never Give Up."

DVD #64, "Fighting for the Obvious: Committee of the Whole ERA debate, reel #1 (#64)," n.d.

*Sound does not work from the 3:47-minute mark to the 6:47-minute mark.

More footage of protestors inside the legislature. More singing of "We Shall Overcome" and the parody, "Are You Sleeping, Illinois?" inside the House of Representatives Guest Gallery. Then, there is silent footage of protestors congregated within the legislature. When the sound returns, there is more chanting and singing by both pro-ERA activists ("ERA, Always") and anti-ERA protestors ("ERA, Go Away").

DVD #65, "Fighting for the Obvious: Committee of the Whole ERA debate, reel #2 (#65)," n.d.

*Video goes blank from 13:45-minute mark to the 14:17-minute mark.

Footage of a legislative hearing of the Committee of the Whole of the House of Representatives. Republican Governor Jim Thompson gives a speech in favor of the ERA in front of the General Assembly, as does NOW President Ellie Smeal. Robert Gibson, head of the Illinois AFL-CIO, also speaks in favor of the ERA, as does a representative of the American Bar Association.

DVD #66, "Fighting for the Obvious: Committee of the Whole ERA Debate, reel #3 (#66)," n.d."

Continuing footage of the legislative hearing. A variety of religious leaders give pro-ERA speeches, including an Illinois priest, a nun from the Sisters of Charity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and the Chairperson-Elect of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious. On the anti-ERA side, Eliza Haskell, the founding member of the Atlanta NOW chapter describes herself as "a feminist opposed to the ERA." Several young women from Chicago also speak out against the ERA, including a 19-year-old teacher who describes being opposed to the potential of being drafted for military service.

DVD #67, "Fighting for the Obvious: Committee of the Whole ERA Debate, reel #4 (#67)," n.d.

Continuing footage of the legislative hearing. More young women speak against being drafted and military conscription. Phyllis Schlafly gives a speech against the ERA, specifically, tax-funded abortions, the Hyde Amendment, the draft, and describes the ERA as "the greatest take away of rights in history." Another woman argues that God made women different from men, therefore illegitimating the ERA's purpose. Reverend William Schroeder argues against the draft and granting the federal government more powers. Representatives ask some of the speakers questions.

DVD #68, "Fighting for the Obvious: Committee of the Whole ERA Deabte, reel #5 (#68)," n.d.

*Video stops working.

Footage switches from continued footage of the hearing to clips from a pro-ERA protest. The video then stops working, and audio plays of Kristen Lems, singer-songwriter, playing ERA songs, such as "Ballad of the ERA," and "We Will Never Give Up, We Will Never Give In." The DVD ends with footage of men talking at a dinner party.

DVD #69, "Fighting for the Obvious: House cutaways, Catania (#69)," 1982

Continuing footage of the hearing, and more assorted testimonies. The ERA is read aloud, Susan Catania gives a speech addressing the draft issue and other facets of the ERA. The DVD ends with an interview of an unidentified male filmmaker.

DVD #70, "Fighting for the Obvious: Ellie Smeal at the Y; Ellie's interview, Ellie's cutaways (#70)," n.d.

Footage shows a meeting of several NOW metropolitan chapters. Linda Miller (co-chair of the ERA Countdown Campaign) and Ellie Smeal (president of NOW) give statements.

DVD #71, "Fighting for the Obvious: Ellie Smeal at the Y; Ellie's interview, Ellie's cutaways (#71)," n.d.

Footage shows speech given in Illinois by Ellie Smeal. Topics include: Mayor Bunn; upcoming rally on 6/6; Illinois' final vote for the ratification of the ERA amendment; FL Governor Grahm; conservative estimations of support; economic issues and gender gap of Reagan support.

DVD #72, "Fighting for the Obvious: Ellie Smeal at the Y; Ellie's interview, Ellie's cutaways (#72)," n.d.

Continuation of speech from the previous dvd. Topic include: insurance discrimination; the Farmer's Bureau; cases that NOW are litigating to prove gender bias; gender bias in social security.

Questions about this collection? Contact the archives
Home | Help | About | Search