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Porter-Phelps-Huntington Family Papers, 1698-1968 (Bulk: 1800-1950)
51 archives boxes, 38 half archives boxes, 46 records storage boxes, 29 small flat boxes, 13 oversize flat boxes, 4 wrapped packages (90 linear ft.)

Abstract:
The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Family Papers document the history of one extended family over 270 years or eight complete generations. The collection is the property of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Foundation, which operates the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House Museum in Hadley, Massachusetts. The house was lived in by six generations of this family, through its entire history, from its construction in 1752, to its incorporation as a museum in 1955. The house museum contains family furnishings and memorabilia and these papers document the history of the house and family.

Terms of Access and Use:

Restrictions on access:

There is no restriction on access to the papers for research use, unless otherwise noted.

Restrictions on use:

Request of permission to publish material from the papers should be directed to the Curator of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Foundation, Inc.

Amherst College Archives and Special Collections

Biographical Note

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington House in Hadley, Massachusetts was home to the same family continuously over six generations and two hundred years. In 1955, it became a museum filled with a family collection of furnishings and folklore. Over the years, the house has been nicknamed "Forty Acres", "Elm Valley", and "the Bishop Huntington House." In this finding aid, it will be refered to as "Forty Acres" or the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House.

Built in 1752, by Captain Moses Porter, this was the first house constructed outside the stockade, which had surrounded Hadley since its settlement in 1659. Moses Porter was killed in the French and Indian War only three years after moving his small family into their new house.

His widow Elizabeth and daughter, also named Elizabeth, lived together in the house. In 1770, the younger Elizabeth married a man named Charles Phelps. He moved into the house with the bride and her mother and took over management of the farm. Charles was a prominent lawyer and politician and he wanted the house to reflect his status, so a vast number of changes were made to it between 1770 and 1799. Charles Phelps also ambitiously expanded the family estate until he owned almost a thousand acres at the time of his death in 1814.

In 1801, the Phelps' daughter, Elizabeth, had married a Connecticut minister by the name of Dan Huntington. In 1816, after her father's death, Elizabeth and her husband moved to Hadley with their nine children and Dan gave up his ministry to manage the farm. In Hadley, two more children were born. In 1817, Elizabeth's brother, Charles Porter Phelps also returned to Hadley and built a house across the road from the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House. Charles Porter Phelps' house is refered to in this finding aid as the "Phelps Farm."

It was the youngest of the eleven Huntington children, Frederic Dan, who loved the family home most. Before his father's death in the 1860s, Frederic Dan bought up his brother's and sister's shares of the big house so that he would inherit it. However, his business as an Episcopal minister in Boston and later Bishop in Syracuse, allowed Frederic Dan to spend only the summer months at the house in Hadley. He did keep the place as an active farm, with a caretaker to look after it during the winters. The house in Hadley was also a popular summer spot for Frederic Dan Huntington's children and grandchildren who all spent a week or two there each year.

George Huntington, Frederic Dan's eldest son, never had a chance to inherit the house, however. Father and son died on the same day in July of 1904. The farm was inherited jointly by George's six children. The best use for the house was rather uncertain at this time. Around 1911, the eldest son, Henry Barrett, tried to run a dairy farm there, but this was unsuccessful.

In 1921, the children took it upon themselves to make the old fashioned house into a suitable summer home for their mother, Lilly Barrett Huntington. This venture was a success and Lilly spent several happy summers there before her death in 1926.

The house then fell into disrepair until the 1930s, when George's middle son, Dr. James Lincoln Huntington, began to take an interest in the history of the house and family. In 1929, he aquired full ownership of the property from his brothers and sister. James then had the 1795 chaise house converted to a residence. He began to spend much time there during the summer and on every available weekend. Through the 1930s and 40s, Dr. Huntington spent an increasing amount of time at "Forty Acres." In 1942, he gave up his Boston medical practice and moved to Hadley permanently. James spent most of his time and all of his money working to preserve the house and research family history. He was able to retrieve much of the old family furniture, which had been dispersed among various relatives, over the years. This he returned to the old house, removing anything that did not have connections to the early family. During the 1940s, he began giving tours of the house and searched for funds to preserve it as a museum permanently. Unfortunately, James was unsuccessful in this quest for funding and in 1955, came very close to selling the house. At this time, however, concerned friends and neighbors came to the rescue with money to form the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Foundation and Dr. Huntington donated the house and its contents to them. Since James Huntington's death in 1968, this private non-profit foundation has continued to preserve the house and open it for tours each summer.

A floor plan of the house in 1820 can be found in BOX 175 of the collection. Architecutral drawings for 20th century alterations are in BOX 176. James Lincoln Huntington's journals of 1922-1964 (BOXES 80a, 80b, 81) are also valuable resources for architectural information.

The above has been a brief history of the house. For a more detailed account, consult the book Forty Acres by Dr. James Lincoln Huntington, a copy of which is available in this collection. However, please note that recent research has proven much of the architectural information in the book to be inaccurate. For detailed architectural information, see the 1988 Historic Structures Report, avaiable from the Archives staff. The house is open for tours May 15 through October 15 (Saturday through Wednesday) and a copy of the tour is also available from Archives staff. Again, the architectural material in this written tour should be disregarded. Researchers may be able to visit the house during winter months by contacting the curator at (413) 584- 4699.

Note

For additional genealogical and biographical information, see BOX 83. This contains material collected by James Lincoln Huntington about the family history. There is material about every branch of the extended family and is a valuable resource for family history information.

See also biographical sketches for the family members whose papers are a part of this collection:

Scope and Contents of the Collection

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Family papers are a significant collection, because they document the continuous history of a large extended family over a period of more than 250 years. The collection's greatest importance is due to its connection with the family's ancestral home in Hadley, Massachusetts. The papers contain material of each member of the families who spent their lives or their summers in the house in Hadley. Not only are there documents of every person who ever lived in the house, also included, are papers of families whose daughters married the Porter, Phelps, and Huntington men. This creates a record of a large extended family, which includes a number of prominent men and women of early New England. Furthermore, the fact that the Porter-Phelps- Huntington House museum in Hadley displays objects owned and used by these families, within the walls of the house where they lived for 200 years, makes this a unique research collection.

Of particular interest in the collection is the correspondence between every member of this large family. Quite probably each person received at least one letter from every other relative who was alive at the time. This cross-generational family network provides a significant amount of information about family relationships.

This is an excellent resource for investigations of all areas of social history. For women's history, a large portion of the correspondence and diaries were written by women and provide a great deal of relevant information. Letters between mothers and daughters over more than five generations, provide a valuable source of information on these relationships. Of particular importance are the diaries of Elizabeth Porter Phelps (1747-1817) and her daughter Elizabeth Whiting Phelps Huntington (1779-1847). These are supplemented by a large number of letters by each woman, creating the possiblity for an in depth study of their lives. The letters of Lilly Barrett Huntington (1848-1926), her mother Lucy Stearns Barrett (1828-1916), and daughter Catharine Huntington (1888-1987) provide another opportunity for mother-daughter research.

Also of importance is the documentation provided in this collection on local Hadley history, as well as that of Massachusetts in general. The Porters, Phelps', and Huntington's and their relatives were prominent, upper middle class residents of New England and upper New York State.

Another strength of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington collection is its breadth. It contains papers of almost every person who ever lived in the house at "Forty Acres." Over the years the professions of key individuals included:

This collection provides information on people of a variety of professions and lifestyles, during a variety of time periods. The common links between these different individuals are the family connections and the house at "Forty Acres." The diversity of material is also important. The collection includes correspondence, journals, financial papers, legal papers, printed material, publications, school papers, professional manuscripts, and more. In addition, cased images and photographs of most family members exist.

Such a large collection of papers testifies to the fact that this family has always had a strong sense of their own history. Supplementing the original documents are numerous family stories that were handed down and recorded in several books written by family members. The perpetuation of this sense of history through the 20th century can be largely attributed to Dr. James Lincoln Huntington, founder of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House museum. He pulled together all the old family papers and began researching them. To this documentation, he added to his knowledge of the family stories, to produce a fairly accurate history of the house and family.

James Lincoln Huntington was one of the pioneers in the historic preservation field, from the 1930s through the 1960s. These family papers contain the correspondence of his strugle to save his family home. This is a valuable collection for the historic preservation field, because is documents the founding of a small historic house museum and perhaps more importantly, the ideas and ideals behind it. Researchers interested in this area, should also see the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Foundation office files.

James Lincoln Huntington was not the only one interested in preserving the House's history, however. Over the years, the family has always maintained a great sentiment for the ancestral home, which was especially strong during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Frederic Dan and George Huntington, both Episcopal ministers, lived in their church rectories rather than owning their own homes. For their families, the summer house in Hadley was their real home. This strong sentiment for the house has manifest itself in several books written by family members about their summers there. In addition to James L. Huntington's Forty Acres of 1949, his aunts Arria Huntington and Ruth Huntington Sessions published Under a Colonial Rooftree and Sixty Odd in 1905 and 1936 respectively. Each of these books is available in this collection, as well as in many libraries.

The breadth and diversity of the Porter-Phelps- Huntington Family Papers, along with their connection to the house museum in Hadley, make this collection a rare research opportunity.

Note

For additional genealogical and biographical information, see BOX 83. This contains material collected by James Lincoln Huntington about the family history. There is material about every branch of the extended family and is a valuable resource for family history information.


Information on Use
Terms of Access and Use
Restrictions on access:

There is no restriction on access to the papers for research use, unless otherwise noted.

Restrictions on use:

Request of permission to publish material from the papers should be directed to the Curator of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Foundation, Inc.

Preferred Citation

Please use the following format when citing materials from this collection:

[Identification of item], in Porter-Phelps-Huntington Family Papers [Box #, folder #], on deposit at Amherst College Archives and Special Collections, Amherst College Library.

History of the Collection

These papers are the property of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Foundation, Inc. They were deposited on extended loan in the Amherst College Archives in 1980, by the Curator of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Foundation, Inc.

Custodial history:

The history of these papers is complex and not altogether clear. Some of the earliest papers were probably saved in the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House since the 1700s. Most of these, however, were considered valuable family documents and seem to have been inherited and taken by various relatives to there respective homes. In the later 19th and early 20th century, family papers were probably brought to the attic of the old house for storage, as it was the only permanent home these minister's family's had. When family members died or houses were sold, "Forty Acres" was the logical place for old papers to be deposited. In this manner, papers of even extended branches of the family came to be housed in Hadley.

Processing Information

In the 1930s, Dr. James Huntington became very interested in preserving the family history and he was probably responsible for bringing the early papers back to the house. He may have contacted the various relatives and asked them to return any old documents they might have.

Dr. Huntington examined these old manuscripts carefully to formulate a history of the house and family. In doing so, he destroyed any original order the papers may have had. It is likely that during the 1930s, Dr. Huntington began to put the papers in some kind of order.

For 30 years, no documented work was done on the papers themselves. Then in the 1960s, a systematic organization of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington family papers was begun by the museum curator and several volunteer students. About a third of the collection, including most of the pre-1900 material, was organized using the methods of the day. The most valuable and interesting early papers were displayed in a document case at the museum. The collection was arranged in a rough chronological order, and placed in acid free folders and boxes. In doing this all original order was lost and no notes are available to tell their reasons or methods. Their intentions were certainly good, but their arrangement was often inconsistant and with no listing of the contents, this collection was, therefore, rather hard to access.

These papers, in their new archival boxes, were stored in a closet in the museum office until 1980, when arrangements were made with The Amherst College Archives to deposit the papers on extended loan there. This measure would provide better conditions for the preservation and safety of these documents. Along with the organized archival boxes of material came many boxes of unprocessed papers. These remained at the Amherst College Archives, in their unorganized and untouched state for several years.

In February of 1987, an intern from the University of Massachusetts, began an 18 month project to complete the processing of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Family Papers. At this time, the unprocessed remainder of the collection, consisting mainly of late 19th and early 20th century material, was removed from the museum attic, cleaned, and transfered to Amherst College. These papers were then examined and organized. Papers and photographs were also removed from drawers of furniture in the museum and from the museum office files.

Once this was done, it became apparent that the methods used on the material sorted in the 1960s, would prove unsatisfactory for use by researchers. A decision was made to undo the processing of the 1960s and integrate the entire collection. The methods used in the final organization are described below.

The original order of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Family Papers was destroyed over the years, so that almost no trace of it remained. Therefore, except for a few cases (these are identified in the descriptions of the papers), no attempt was made to maintain the order in which the materials were found.

The materials relating to individual family members are organized in 41 units. Each significant person in the collection has their own unit, housed in one or more boxes. These consist of incoming and outgoing correspondence, printed material by or about the person, miscellaneous manuscripts, printed material saved by the person, school , and occasional journals and account books. The papers of early Porters, Phelps', and Huntingtons, previous to 1752 and the construction of the house at "Forty Acres", are housed in the first two boxes of the family papers.

The bulk of the collection is correspondence. Most of these are letters between various family members. Letters are placed in the boxes according to the person who wrote them. These are grouped into folders according to the individual to whom the letter is addressed. The folders are then arranged alphabetically by addressee, often using first names, as the last name is often the same. Within the folders, letters are in chronological order. If the researcher desires to examine letters written to an individual, from other family members, they should look at the listings for boxes of all siblings and parents. Correspondence incoming from non-family is placed in the unit of the recipient. These letters are arranged in alphabetical order by the name of the writer. When there is a large ammount of incoming correspondence, this is broken down by decade or year and arranged alphabetically within these groupings. In cases where these methods were not followed, a note has been made in the description of the unit.

The units of members of the Porter, Phelps, and Huntington families are listed and shelved according to generation. The siblings of a given generation, along with their spouses, are arranged in order of birth. (Women who married into the families are identified by their married names.) In some generations, there is not enough material on each sibling to have a separate box for each. In these cases, the siblings are grouped in a unit and labelled as the children or family of their father. Wives sometimes fall into these family units, as well.

In addition to the papers of the three main families, are 13 units of materials of the extended family. These consist of papers of the families of women who married Huntington men and also those families and descendants of Huntington women who married and aquired a new family name. These materials are divided into units by family name. The boxes of each family are listed and shelved alphabetically. Within a family box, each individual has their own folder(s), arranged in rough generational order. These extended family units are listed and shelved after the Porter, Phelps, and Huntington families.

Photographs and cased images form a separate unit. These are listed and shelved after the extended family units. Photographs were not included in the units of individual people, because they are often group shots. Therefore, within this section, photographs are organized by family or generation. Consult the container listing to identify the location of pictures of a given person. Group photographs are placed in folders labelled with the father's name. For instance George Huntington family photographs may include combinations of George, his wife, and children. Oversized photographs are identified in individual folders and placed in separate boxes, arranged alphabetically. There are also four boxes of unidentified cased images and photographs. (If any identifications are made, please notify the Archivist.)

Another unit contains miscellaneous unidentified papers. These are papers with no name and unidentifiable handwriting. There is also a box of documents with names of people whose relationship to the family cannot be identified.

A unit of printed material contains books published by family members about the house and family. These include copies of Forty Acres by James L. Huntington, Under A Colonial Rooftree by Arria Huntington, and Sixty Odd by Ruth Huntington Sessions. There is also a copy of the Huntington Family Geneology. Printed material also includes some magazines and pamphlets saved by unidentified family members.

A separate unit for miscellaneous oversized and legal sized material was created. A note is placed in the box of an individual, directing the researcher to look in the oversized material boxes. Within these boxes, folders are arranged alphabetically.

Processed:1987-88
By:Kari Ann Federer, Museum Assistant, Porter-Phelps-Huntington House

Description of the Papers

This description of the papers consists of biographical sketches for the family members whose papers are a part of this collection. They are in alphabetical order. Following each sketch is a description of the individual's papers and an indication of the boxes in which they are contained. Vital statistic information in the biographical sketches is incomplete.

Thomas Barbour (1886-?)

Tom was the son of William Barbour and was born on Martha's Vineyard on August 21, 1884. From Harvard he received his A.B. in 1906, his A.M. in 1908, and his PhD. in 1911. In 1906, Thomas married Rosamond Pierce (born 1886). He was a professor of zoology and the director of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard College.

The Barbour's were very close to their in-laws, the Huntingtons. Tom corresponded frequently with James Lincoln Huntington and most of his papers were originally found among James', but they were separated out because of the family connection and can now be found in the Barbour Family box (BOX 108).

Thomas Barbour's papers include two folders of letters to James Huntington in the 1920s and 30s. There are also several pamphlets published by him. See also James L. Huntington's papers, BOX 81, for James' journals of trips made with Tom in 1936 and 1941.

See the newspapers box for an article by Barbour in Life magazine.

Harry Hudson Barrett (1851-1930s?)

Harry Barrett was born in Malden on March 10, 1851, the son of Henry and Lucy Barrett. Harry attended Phillips Andover Academy, graduated from Harvard in 1874, and from Harvard Law School in 1879. He became a prominent Boston lawyer. For 40 years, he was the attorney for the Malden Cooperative Bank. He also served in the Massachusetts Legislature, representing his life long home of Malden. After his father's death in 1892, Harry took over management of the family finances. In 1900, he married Alice Morse Wardle, she died and he later married again to Anna ___. He had one daughter, Beatrice. Harry Barrett died sometime between 1937 and 1941.

Harry's papers, in BOX 113, include outgoing correspondence, mostly to his sister Lilly Barrett Huntington and her children. Two folders of letter to Lilly from 1864 to 1925, are interesting. Also included is one letter from Beatrice Barrett to Lilly and a watercolor done by her in 1917. See the Photographs BOX 138.

Henry Barrett (1807-1892)

Henry was the son of William and Mary Keiser Hall Barrett. He was born in Malden, Massachusetts in 1807 and lived there all his life. He and his brothers carried on the profitable family business of Barrett's Dye House, which his father had founded. Henry's first wife was a distant cousin, but she died of consumption only a few months after the marriage. On January 19, 1848, Henry married Lucy Stearns of Salem.

The Barretts lived on Main Street in Malden. They were Unitarians, but attended the Universalist church, as there was no Unitarian one in the area.

The family's work in the dye house caused the developement of tuberculosis of the lungs. William Barrett died of it in 1834, and by that time, son Henry had contracted the disease as well. To improve his health, Henry Barrett spent summers in the White Mountains and winters near Mobile, Alabama, apparently running the Dye House from afar. This cure was successful, the disease was arrested, and Henry lived to be 85 years old, dying in 1892.

Children: Lilly St. Agnan (See biographical sketch under Lilly Barrett Huntington)
Richard Stearns (See biographical sketch below)
Harry Hudson (See biographical sketch above)
Caroline (See biographical sketch under Caroline Barrett Littlefield)

Two cartons of Henry Barrett's papers are contained in the collection. Among his personal papers, in BOX 110, there are about 25 letters outgoing to family members during the 1860s and 80s. The bulk of Henry's papers are financial. Twenty two folders of personal bills and receipts of the 1880s and 90s, provide much information about the wealthy Barrett family household. Henry and Lucy Barrett's legal papers show the large amount of real estate owned and managed by this family.

Business and financial papers of the Barrett and Brothers Dye House are found in BOX 111. These are mostly financial statements and yearly reports of the 1830s through the 1870s. See also BOX 109 for misc. Barrett family legal and financial papers of 1835-50.

Lucy Theodora Gellineau Stearns Barrett (1824-1916)

Lucy was born on May 27, 1824. She was the daughter of Richard and Marianne St. Agnan Stearns of Salem, Massachusetts (see Stearns family biographical sketches). In 1841, at the age of 17, Lucy was attending Bradford Academy in Bradford, Massachusetts. She married Henry Barrett on January 19, 1848 and went to live with him in Malden. Lucy outlived her husband by many years, dying in Malden in 1916, at the age of 92.

Children: See children of Henry Barrett above

Lucy Stearns Barrett's papers, in BOX 112, include mostly outgoing correspondence. There are seven folders of letters to daughter Lilly Barrett Huntington, between 1864 and 1916. These are valuable in documenting this mother- daughter relationship, as well as life in Boston during the late 19th and early 20th century. There are two folders of letters from childhood friends in the 1830s. See also BOX 110, for Henry and Lucy Barrett legal and financial papers. These are important, because the Barrett's had many investments and Lucy managed them herself for the many years after her husband's death in 1892. See also BOX 109 for misc. Barrett family legal and financial papers of 1835-50. See the photographs BOX 138. See BOX 82, family geneology information, for letters from Lucy about the family history.

Richard Stearns Barrett (1854-?)

Born May 2, 1854 (?)

Children: Theresa St. Agnan Barrett (Cochrane) or "Teasie"
Theodore
Devens

Richard Barrett's few papers are in BOX 113. They include four letters to sister Lilly Barrett Huntington from 1873 to 1896. There is one letter to Lilly from "Teasie." For more of her letters, see James Lincoln Huntington Correspondence-incoming in BOX 66. See photographs BOX 138.

William Barrett (1770s-1834)

William Barrett was born during the Battle of Bunker Hill. His father, Nathaniel, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. William moved to Malden, as a young man, and established a dye-works that bore the family name for nearly a century. In 1804, he married Mary Keiser Hall (1783-1840) of Charlestown, Massachusetts.

In the 1830s, William contracted tuberculosis from his work in the dye house. He died in Malden in 1834.

Children: Order of birth unknown
Henry- See his biographical sketch above
Caroline
Hall
Richard
Aaron ?

William Barrett's papers are in BOX 109, along with miscellaneous Barrett family material. There are deeds and financial papers from 1805 to 1834. An appraisal of his buildings in 1828 is valuable, as are his will and estate inventory of 1835. Related to these is the folder of Mary Barrett's 1835 financial papers. William and Mary Barrett's portraits hang in the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House. See the Photographs BOX 138.

William Ingersoll Bowditch (1819-1909)

William, son of Nathaniel Bowditch, was born in Salem, Massachusetts on August 5, 1819. He attended Harvard, receiving his A.B. in 1838 and his LL.B. in 1841. In 1844, he married Sara Rhea Higginson (1819-1919). The Bowditch's lived in Brookline, where William was a conveyancer and trustee.

Children:
James Higginson- Born 1846, lived in Brookline, was a landscape gardener. The collection contains his scrapbook of 1861, in the Bowditch family box.
William Ernestus
Frederick Channing
Susan Higginson
Louisa Higginson- See Louisa Bowditch Pierce

The Bowditch family box (BOX 114) includes eight letters from William to his youngest daughter, Louisa, in 1866 and 67. These letters include wonderful little fairy stories. The box also includes a Bowditch geneology book.

Caroline Phelps Bullfinch (1814-?)

Caroline was born August 22, 1814 in Boston, the daughter of Charles Porter and Sarah Phelps. When Caroline was only three, her mother died and the family moved to Hadley. There she was raised by her mother's cousin, Charlotte, who later became her step-mother.

Caroline was the only one of Charles Porter Phelps' children to marry. She became the wife of Reverend Stephen Bullfinch, the son of famous architect Charles Bullfinch. The ceremony was performed by Caroline's uncle, Dan Huntington, on December 27, 1842. The Bullfinch's apparantly lived in Boston.

Children:
Annie
Ellen- See biographical sketch below

There are no papers of Caroline Phelps Bullfinch but she is important to the collection as the family link to the famous Bullfinch's. There are two letters to Caroline from her Bullfinch brothers-in-law, in BOX 115.

Ellen S. Bullfinch (1840s?-1921)

Ellen, daughter of Caroline and Stephen Bullfinch, was born some time in the 1840s or 50s. She grew up in Boston and lived in Cambridge, later in life. Ellen never married.

Ellen is said to have owned the Phelps farm in Hadley and probably spent the summer months there, until she sold it in the 1890s to Frederic Dan Huntington. She was very interested in the family history and was the owner of a number of family documents and objects, which were later returned to the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House. Ellen was an artist who drew many sketches of the family and the houses in Hadley. A few of these are owned by the Porter-Phelps- Huntington House museum. The others seem to have been in the possession of the Sessions family.

Ellen Bullfinch's papers are contained in the Bullfinch Family box (BOX 115). There are three unidentified letters to her probably from her Phelps aunts. See also the Charles Porter Phelps Family box (BOX 11) for letters to Ellen from aunt Susan Phelps, mentioning the Dickinson family of Amherst. The collection contains one or two letters to each of her Huntington second cousins. There is a full folder of letters to Lilly Huntington 1904-1917. In 1898, Ellen visited the Lake George Battle Grounds where her ancestor, Moses Porter, died and she wrote and account of her visit.

Edward Thorton Fisher (1836-?)

"Ned" Fisher was born 1836 in Oswego, New York. He was the youngest child of George and Elizabeth Huntington Fisher. During the Civil War he was a member of the 9th Regiment of New York and fought in Maryland and Virginia. After the War, on June 30, 1869, Edward married Ellen Thayer Bowditch (1847- 1911) in Brooklyn, New York.

Children:
Faith- Born 1870, married William Fenn, died 1944
Henry Thayer- Born 1873, died 1874
Edward Thorton- Born 1875, died 1876
Richard- Born 1876, married Georgina Paine
Margaret- Born 1878, died 1880
Reginald- Born April 1882, died July 1882
Eleanor- Born 1888, married Laurence Grose

Edward T. Fisher's papers are found in BOX 117. These are a valuable resource, as they are letters written in 1860- 63, while he was a soldier in the Civil War. See photographs BOX 133.

Elizabeth Porter Huntington Fisher (1803-1897)

Elizabeth Huntington was born May 8, 1803 in Litchfield Connecticut. She was the second child of Dan and Elizabeth Huntington. Elizabeth met her husband George Fisher on a stage coach journey to western New York. George had graduated from Brown University in 1813. He returned to Hadley to marry Elizabeth in 1824. They then moved to Oswego, New York, where he was president of the North West Insurance Company. They remained in Oswego throughout their lives. Elizabeth died there in 1864.

Children:
Elizabeth Phelps- See biographical sketch under Elizabeth Fisher Sessions
Frederick Pitkin
Francis Porter (Frank)
George Huntington- Born 1832, died 1910
Catherine Whiting
Edward Thorton- See biographical sketch above

BOX 116 of Elizabeth Huntington Fisher and family contains correspondence arranged alphabetically by the writer of the letter. There are letters from Elizabeth H. Fisher, George Fisher, and their children. These papers are important as the family lived in the young and prosperous port city of Oswego, New York at a time when the country was beginning to rapidly expand in that westward direction. See also the papers of Elizabeth's son Edward in BOX 117. See the photographs BOX 133.

Agnes Genevieve Keefe Huntington (1904-1986)

Genevieve Keefe was born in Boston on May 28, 1904. She became Dr. James Lincoln Huntington's second wife on December 29, 1944. Previous to the marriage, she was living in Amherst and working for the New England Telephone Company.

Genevieve lived with Dr. Huntington in the Chaise house at "Forty Acres" and continued to reside in the apartment there after his death. She worked with him to preserve the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House as a museum, but the financial commiment to the project took a toll on her enthusiasm.

Genevieve sold Beauty Counselor cosmetics from her home. In the 1950s, she lived and worked in the Dickinson House of Mount Holyoke College. Her husband died in 1968. Genevieve acted as interim curator of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House for the 1977 summer season.

In September of 1977, she married John Valentine Ludwig Steinmetz ("Val") and moved to Florida, where she was activities director of their retirement condominium. She died there in 1985.

Genevieve Huntington's few papers are contained in BOX 87. There are about 40 letters to her husband in the 1940s and 50s. Another folder contains eight letters to sister-in-law, Catharine Huntington in the 50s and 60s, telling of Jimmy's failing health and financial situation. Three other folders of correspondence in and out are not well organized, but are left as they were saved in folders by Genevieve and/or Dr. Huntington. Some of this correspondence concerns early museum business. Researchers should also see the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Foundation office files, for more letters from Genevieve. See photographs BOX 140. See also James L. Huntington Family checkbooks and bank statements in BOXES 78-79.

Annie Oakes Huntington (1875-1940)

Annie Oakes was born in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts on June 12, 1875. She was the second child of E.H. Mills and Elizabeth Quincy Huntington. She spent her first years near Boston. When she was ten, her family lived in Hong Kong for four years. Annie never married. She published two books on botany, Studies of Trees in Winter and Poison Ivy and Sumac. Later in life, she lived on a farm in Harrison, Maine, dying there on November 27, 1940.

BOX 39 of the collection contains five letters outgoing and eight incoming. Her obituary is also included. See the photographs BOX 132. For more information see the book of her letters, Testament of Happiness, published in 1947 by her sister Elizabeth Quincy Huntington. This includes letters written to friends from her childhood in Hong Kong to her death in Maine. The book can be found in the Boltwood Room of the Jones Library in Amherst.

Arria Sargent Huntington (1848-1921)

Arria was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, January 22, 1848. She was the eldest daughter of Frederic Dan and Hannah Huntington. Arria grew up in the Boston area where she was educated in private schools. In 1869, she moved to Syracuse, New York with her parents. She continued to live there throughout her life, never marrying although she had many suitors.

Arria devoted her life to work for social reforms. Her main concern was for the "fallen woman" and she worked building a shelter for homeless women and passing legislation to assist them. Arria also worked with the prison system of New York to provide separate quarters for women. She was a member of the board of trustees of the Women's Reformatory.

Arria Huntington was also active in child welfare work and was largely responsible for the passage of the first child labor laws in New York state. She served on the board of trustees of the Shelter for Unprotected Girls and also worked with the YWCA and the Girl's Patriotic League, during World War I. In addition, Miss Huntington started the Visiting Nurses Association and was a founder of Syracuse Memorial Hospital.

Arria was also know as a writer of books and plays. Her most important works were The Memoirs and Letters of Frederic Dan Huntington and Under a Colonial Rooftree about life on the family farm at "Forty Acres" in Hadley. Arria's plays included "A Harvest Night's Dream", "A Homespun Herione", "Sharps and Flats", and "Wheel or Woe."

Arria Huntington died March 24, 1921. She was a very successful woman and is well remembered for her contributions to the city of Syracuse.

Arria's papers are contained in BOX 55. They consist mainly of outgoing correspondence to her relatives. There are five folders of letters to her brother George, between the 1860s and 1904. A typed copy of her journal 1862-63, tells of the days in Boston and Hadley. There are copies of two of her published plays, as well as programs. Finally are clippings and memorials at her death. See also the two books written by her, in BOX 165. See the photographs BOX 136.

Benjamin Lincoln Huntington (1912-?)

Ben, the first child of James and Sarah Huntington was born in Boston on April 6, 1912. He grew up in Brookline, spending time in Hadley during the summers. He attended St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire from 1926 to 1930. Ben then graduated from Harvard in 1934. He rowed on the crew teams of both schools. He later attended medical school, but it is not clear where.

Ben married Susan Harris Brewer on June 1, 1940. The couple lived in Manchester, Massachusetts. By the 1950s, Ben was the Associated Medical Director of John Hancock Life Insurance.

Children:
Robert
Stephen

Ben Huntington's papers fill four cartons (BOXES 99- 102). Three of these contain school work and notes, as well as printed school material from the 1920s and 30s. These papers are mostly undated and are not in chronological order. BOX 99 contains correspondence. There are two folders of letters from Susan Brewer in 1936-37, before their marriage. Five folders contain letters to father James Huntington in the 1950s and 60s. See photographs BOX 143.

Bethia Throop Huntington (1805-1879)

Bethia was born October 7, 1805 in Litchfield, Connecticut. At the age of 11, she moved to Hadley with her parents, Dan and Elizabeth Huntington. Bethia was educated, along with her sisters, at Miss Willard's School in Troy, New York. She never married and lived in the family home in Hadley all her life. When her father died in 1864, "Forty Acres" was left to Bethia's brother, Frederic, but with the stipulation that she could live there through her life. Bethia was apparently the last family member to live in the house year round. She died there in September 1879.

Bethia's papers are in BOX 20 of Dan and Elizabeth Huntington's daughters. They include her "commonplace book" of 1836-40. Ten outgoing letters in the 1860s and 70s, document the last days of the families permanent residence at the house at "Forty Acres." For correspondence written to Bethia, see the boxes of her other siblings and her parents. Her brother, Frederic Dan, wrote most often. See Photographs BOX 132.

Catharine Sargent Huntington (1887-1987)

Catharine, the only daughter of George and Lilly Huntington, was born in Ashfield, Massachusetts on December 29, 1887. She grew up in Hanover, New Hampshire.

Below is a list of the important dates of her life:

1904-1906Lived at Cedar Square, Roxbury with her aunt Kate Sumner, attended private school in the Boston area
1906-1907Lived in London with brother Constant
1911Graduated from Radcliffe
1911-?Taught English at a boarding school in Connecticut.
1914 Spent summer in Europe
1915-1916Living in Middlebury, Connecticut
1919In France, working with the YMCA
1922Helped to found the Boston Stage Society
1920s-1970s Lived at 66 Pinckney Street, Boston
1927Arrested at demonstration against Sacco and Vanzetti's execution
1940Founded Provincetown Playhouse with Edwin Pettit and Virginia Thoms
1938 Founded New England Repertory Theater on Joy Street in Boston
1965Won the Rodgers and Hammerstein award for "having done the most in the Boston area for the American theater."
1977Provincetown Playhouse burned by arson
1980s Lived at Sherrill House in Boston
1983Recognized, on her 97th birthday, by Gov. Michael Dukakis and the Massachusetts Legislature for her contributions to American theater
1987Died on February 27, at the age of 99

Catharine Huntington was affiliated with other theaters, including the Peabody Playhouse, the Brattle Theater, the Tributary Theater, and the Poet's Theater. She also had a strong interest in gardening. Her Pinckney Street garden was included in a book on Beacon Hill gardens. She loved her garden in Hadley and kept it up for many years. Catharine came often to visit her brother, James L. Huntington, at "Forty Acres."

Letters to Catharine from her family can be found in the boxes of her mother and all her brothers, expecially James (BOX 65) with whom she corresponded frequently until his death in 1968.

Catharine donated the bulk of her papers to the Harvard Theater Collection and the Schlesinger Library at Radcliffe.

Researchers should see pages 178 to 186 of Katharine Butler Hathaway's, The Little Locksmith. This book is available in this collection. Letters to Catharine from Katharine Hathaway can be found in the Journals and Letters of the Little Locksmith, published in 1946.

See photographs BOX 139 for many pictures of Catharine, including some of her dressed in her great great great grandmother, Elizabeth Porter's wedding dress.

See also BOX 90 of Michael Paul Huntington's papers for letters from Catharine to him in the 1930s and 40s.

Catherine Carey Huntington (1817-1830)

Catherine, the tenth child of Dan and Elizabeth Huntington, was born in the house at "Forty Acres" in Hadley on May 8, 1817. She grew up there, but died at the age of 13 on August 15, 1830, after a two month bout with typhous fever. Catherine was the first of the eleven Huntington children to die and this was a tragic event for the family. For a detailed account of her death, see the "commonplace book" of her sister Bethia (in BOX 20).

The box of Dan and Elizabeth Huntington's daughters (BOX 20) contains eight letters from Catherine to her brother John, sister Mary, and her mother all written from Hadley in the late 1820s.

Charles Phelps Huntington (1802-1868)

Charles was the first child of Dan and Elizabeth Huntington, born May 24, 1802. He lived in Connecticut until the age of 14, when the family moved to Hadley. He graduated from Harvard College in 1822 and became a lawyer.

On October 28, 1827 he married Helen Sophia Mills in Northampton. The Charles Phelps Huntington family lived in Northampton and Helen Sophia died there March 30, 1844. Charles was president of the Northampton Institute of Savings for eight years. Charles later moved to Milton, Massachusetts and married a second time on January 2, 1847. His wife Ellen Greenough (1814-1893) was the sister of the well-known sculptor, Horatio and of the architect, Horace. Charles was judge of the Supreme Court from 1855 to 1861 and collector of Internal Revenue in 1862. In 1858, he moved his family to Boston where he died on January 29, 1868.

Charles Phelps Huntington had the honor, during his lifetime, of having a town named after him. In 1853, the villages of Chester and Blanford, Massachusetts were annexed to the town of Norwich. Charles did much of the legal work for this process and aided in securing the annexation. However, the inhabitants of these new parts did not favor the name of Norwich. So in 1855, the name of the town was changed to Huntington in honor of their lawyer friend.

Children:
Helen Frances- See Helen Frances Huntington Quincy
Charles Whiting- Born in 1834, married in 1864 Annie Oakes Thayer
Elijah Hunt Mills- See his biographical sketch
Helen Sophia- Born 1838, died 1839 in Northampton
Mary Elizabeth- See her biographical sketch
Edward Stanton- See his biographical sketch
Harriette- Born 1843, died 1844
Henry Greenough- Born 1848
Laura Curtis- Born 1849, died 1874 in Florence, Italy

Charles Phelps Huntington's papers, in BOX 17, include outgoing correspondence to his brothers, his first wife, and his daughter Helen Frances. He rarely dated his letters, so these are not in order. Of particular value is a copy of a letter to Charles from Daniel Webster in 1836. There are a number of other manuscripts written by him, including a journal of 1831, essays and lectures, and his account of his wife's death in 1844. There are also two recent newspaper clippings about him. The papers of his family in BOX 18, include letters to Charles Huntington from his children. See the oversized materials box for his geneological chart, his Harvard B.A., and drawings and watercolors by him. See BOX 175, legal size materials. See photographs BOX 132. At the Jones Library in the Boltwood Room are two clippings about Charles Phelps Huntington of 1850 and 1854.

Constant Davis Huntington (1876-1962)

On September 20, 1876, the second son of George and Lilly Huntington was born in Malden, Massachusetts. Constant lead a successful life, as head of G.P. Putnam's Sons Publishers in London. He helped the family put his younger brothers and sister through college, after his father's death in 1904. Although he lived far away, Constant maintained a life interest and love for the ancestral homestead at "Forty Acres" in Hadley and through letters, was very much involved in decisions made about its future.

Below is a list of the important events of his life:

1892-1893Holderness School, Holderness, New Hampshire
1893-1895St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hampshire
1895-1899 Harvard
1902G.P. Putnam's Sons Publishers, New York City
1905G.P. Putnam's Sons Ltd., London
1916 October 17, married Gladys Theodora Parrish, daughter of Alfred and Kate (Jennings) Parrish of Philadelphia. Gladys was born December 13, 1887.
1962Died in London

Children:
Georgiana Mary Alfreda- Born January 11, 1922. She married Brian Urquart and had three children, Kate, Thomas, and Robert. They lived in London and New York, Brian working for the United Nations.

The collection contains three linear feet of Constant Huntington's papers, BOXES 61-64. These consist mainly of correspondence outgoing to his various relatives. There are seven full folders of letters to his brother James and these contain information about the family's efforts to preserve the house in Hadley. The bulk of Constant's papers are letters to his mother, which fill almost two cartons. He wrote to her almost every day from the 1880s until the 1920s. These letters document the course of his life and along with Lilly's letters in return, show a strong mother-son relationship in the early 20th century. The collection also contains some correspondence outgoing from his wife Gladys to her in-laws in the 1920s-50s and a few outgoing from his daughter Alfreda.

See the photographs BOX 139. See also the separate unit of Michael Paul Huntington papers, BOXES 90-93, for letters from Constant and Gladys in the 1930s and 40s. See also the Sargent family BOX 125 for correspondence between Constant and Paul about the John O. Sargent will dispute in 1946-47.

Dan Huntington (1774-1864)

Dan was born October 11, 1774 in Lebanon, Connecticut. He was the youngest of William and Bethia Throop Huntington's eight children. Dan was prepared for college by Master Nathan Tisdale. In 1794, he graduated from Yale, after teaching school for a term in Suffield, Connecticut. He then spent two years as a tutor at Williams College and during the summer of 1796, was licensed to preach by the Berkshire Association of Congregational Ministers. In the fall of that year, he returned to Yale as a tutor and under President Timothy Dwight IV, began working on his Master's Degree, which he received in 1797. Dan Huntington was ordained and in 1798, was installed in the Congregational Church of Litchfield.

On New Year's Day 1801, Dan was married to Elizabeth Phelps. In Litchfield, they began their large family, which would eventually number eleven children. In 1809, Dan was a candidate for the pastorate in Hadley, but failed through "jealously of the Phelps family influence." Instead, he moved his family to Middletown, where he began preaching at the First Congregational Church. In order to earn extra money, Rev. Huntington opened his house as a boarding school.

A minister's salary was not enough to support a family of nine children, however. In 1816, two years after his father-in-law, Charles Phelps' death, Dan moved his family to Hadley. He there took over management of his wife's family farm at "Forty Acres," where two more children were born. From 1817 to 1820 he also found time to serve as interim minister of the newly-established Second Congregational Church in Greenfield, preaching at the dedication of the church building. Dan Huntington served as Principal of Hopkins Academy from 1817 to 1820 and was a Trustee until his death in 1864. He was the first postmaster of North Hadley. During the 1820s and 30s, Dan and his wife underwent a conversion to Unitarianism and he was censured by the Hadley Congregational Church in 1835. On October 31, 1864, Dan Huntington died in Hadley.

Children: See individual biographical sketches for each
Charles Phelps
Elizabeth Porter- See Elizabeth Huntington Fisher
William Pitkin
Bethia Throop
Edward Phelps
John Whiting
Theophilus Parsons
Theodore Gregson
Mary Dwight
Catherine Carey
Frederic Dan

Dan Huntington's papers are contained in BOXES 15-16. Biographical sketches at the front of the box give detailed accounts of his life and work. Outgoing correspondence includes letters to his children, many to Frederic Dan. There are also some to his brother-in-law, Charles Porter Phelps, and a few to his wife, Elizabeth. There is incoming correspondence about Dan's conversion to Unitarianism and some from the Hampshire, Franklin, and Hampden Agricultural Society.

The little financial and legal material of Dan Huntington includes an account book of 1821-1849 and information on his estate. See also the account book of William Porter for Dan Huntington's 1839 account with Porter's store.

The bulk of Dan's papers are professional and church related. There is information about his ministries, professional correspondence, including his calls to churches and censure by the Congregational Church on Hadley in 1835. Researchers should also see Elizabeth Phelps Huntington's BOX 113 for a folder of material concerning her posthumous exoneration by the Hadley church. This contains copies of correspondence about the Huntington's conversion and censure by the church in the 1820s and 30s.

These papers are important, because they help document the life of a Congregational minister who converted to Unitarianism, in a time when this was commmon. They also help document life at "Forty Acres" in the early 19th century.

See the photographsBOX 132 for photos of Dan Huntington's portraits. An original hangs in the Porter- Phelps-Huntington House.

See also Memories Counsels, and Reflections, by An Octagenary, published in 1857 by Dan Huntington. This includes an autobiography, geneology, and a biography of Elizabeth Phelps Huntington. A copy is available at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington museum and one can also be found at the Jones Library in Amherst, in the Boltwood Room. Also in the Boltwood Room, is Dan Huntington's obituary of November 4, 1864, from the Hampshire Franklin Express.

Edward Phelps Huntington (1807-1843)

Edward, the fifth child of Dan and Elizabeth Huntington, was born in Litchfield, Connecticut on April 25, 1807. He married Helen Maria Williams (1819-1902).

In the early 1830s, Edward lived in Northampton. In 1837, he was in Boston and in 1838 in New Brunswick. In 1839, the family settled in Cabotville, Massachusetts, near Springfield. He was a businessman and in 1841, was editor of the Cabotville Chronicle. Edward died young on October 26, 1843. He apparently had no children.

Edward's papers are in BOX 19 of Dan and Elizabeth's sons. There are five outgoing letters in the 1830s, as well as 15 pieces of incoming correspondence from someone named Lucian Minor (?) in the 30s and 40s. More importantly are two folders of financial papers of the 1830s. Letters to Edward can be found in the boxes of his parents and brothers and sisters. A portrait of his wife Helen Maria, hangs at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House.

Edward Stanton Huntington (1841-1895)

Edward was the sixth child of Charles Phelps and Helen Sophia Mills Huntington. He was born in Northampton on April 3, 1841. He lived in Boston until 1861. In 1868, moved to Logansport, Indiana, where he married Julia Ann Pratt.

Edward was an army officer and an author. He wrote for periodicals on social and ethical problems. He was a Captain in the Civil War and afterwards in the U.S. Infantry. He was engaged in 17 battles and spent 11 months in the Libby and Andersonville prisons.

In 1878, Edward returned to Massachusetts, to live in Wollaston, where he died on January 16, 1895.

Children:
Charles Pratt- Born 1871

The Charles Phelps Huntington family box (BOX 18) contains four letters written by Edward to his father, while fighting in the Civil War in 1862. These tell in great detail about battles and camp life. There are also three letters to his cousin Frederic Dan Huntington in the 1890s.

Elijah Hunt Mills Huntington (1836-1891)

E.H. Mills, the third child of Charles Phelps and Helen Sophia Mills Huntington, was born in Northampton on July 22, 1836. On October 31, 1871, he married Elizabeth Quincy. She was the daughter of Samuel and Abby Adams Beale Quincy and had been born in Boston in 1841. Mills was a merchant and importer and was associated with the Boston firm of Russell and Co. He went to China from 1851 to 1869. In 1885, he returned there with his family, living in Hong Kong for four years. On the family's return to the U.S., they settled in Jamaica Plain where he died on April 16, 1891. His wife Elizabeth died in 1937.

Children:
Cabot Mills- Born 1872, died 1873
Annie Oakes- See her biographical sketch
Elizabeth Quincy-Born 1880 in Jamaica Plain

E.H. Mills Huntington's papers, in BOXES 38-39, consist mainly of three letter books, filled with letters to and from him in the 1860s-90s. These are very interesting as they document his sea trade business. They also tell of travel and his family's life in China, during the 1880s. Mills wrote from such places as Shanhai, Canton, the Cape of Good Hope, and Hong Kong. The collection also contains a few letters each to his father, sister Fanny, his wife, and his children in the 1850s-70s.

Elizabeth Whiting Phelps Huntington (1779-1847)

Elizabeth, daughter of Charles and Elizabeth Phelps, was born in Hadley on February 4, 1779. She grew up on her parents very large farm at "Forty Acres" and was well educated, though probably informally. In the 1790s, she travelled several times to Boston and Newburyport to visit with her brother Charles, sometimes staying for months at a time.

Elizabeth met Dan Huntington in 1799, when he was guest preacher in Hadley and drank tea at the Phelps'. Two years later, on New Years' Day 1801, they were married at "Forty Acres." The young couple went to Dan's home in Litchfield, Connecticut, where he was minister of the Congregational church. Later in the year, Elizabeth suffered from scarlet fever. In 1802, their first son was born, beginning their family, which was to grow to 11 children within 17 years. In 1809, the family moved to Middletown and Dan took over the ministry there.

A minister's salary was just not enough to support this large family, so after Elizabeth's father's death, the Huntingtons decided to move to her family farm in Hadley. In 1816, Dan returned to "Forty Acres."

Over the next few years, Elizabeth Huntington went through a change in her views of the Trinity and in the 1820s, she was excommunicated from the Hadley Congregational church. After this, she and some of her children attended the Unitarian church in Northampton, but this could not replace the social life she lost by being barred from Hadley Church activities.

On April 6, 1847, Elizabeth died in Hadley, having spent all but 15 years of her life at "Forty Acres."

Children: See individual biographical sketches for each
Charles Phelps
Elizabeth Porter- See Elizabeth Huntington Fisher
William Pitkin
Bethia Throop
Edward Phelps
John Whiting
Theophilus Parsons
Theodore Gregson
Mary Dwight
Catherine Carey
Frederic Dan

Elizabeth Huntington's papers, which fill BOXES 12-14, are an extremely valuable resource for women's history. She was truely a remarkable woman, raising eleven children to adulthood. BOX 13, outgoing correspondence to her mother between 1797 and 1814, tell a great deal about the family's life in Connecticut. They discuss the children, household help, family health, travel, and hopes of visits to Hadley. These combined with letters written in return by Elizabeth Porter Phelps (BOX 5), document a strong mother-daughter bond. A box of typed copies of these letters, makes researh easier. In the second box of correspondence, are letters to the Huntington children, with many to Frederic Dan and Elizabeth (Fisher) written in the 1830s and 40s. These tell of family matters and events as her children were reaching adulthood, leaving home, and marrying. Elizabeth Huntington also wrote frequently to her future sister-in-law, Sarah Parsons, in the 1790s.

Valuable information about Elizabeth's excommunication is found in a folder of material about her exoneration by the Hadley church made posthumously in 1976. This contains copies of correspondence about the Huntington's conversion to Unitarianism and their censure by the Hadley church.

Elizabeth Huntington kept a diary from 1798 to 1846. This is located in BOX 14 and contains little information about the family and everyday life. However, it is extremely valuable due to its religious content, which documents Elizabeth's gradual conversion to Unitarianism. This transition of faith was very common at the time, but it was perhaps unusual for a woman to exhert her own views so strongly.

See photographsBOX 132 for photos of her portrait, which is on display at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House Museum.

Frederic Dan Huntington (1819-1904)

Frederic Dan, the youngest of Dan and Elizabeth Huntington's eleven children, was born in Hadley on May 28, 1819. He grew up on the farm at "Forty Acres" and went to college nearby in Amherst.

Below is a list of the important events of his life:

1839Graduate as valdictorian from Amherst College.
1840 (?)Prepared for the Unitarian ministry at Harvard Divinity School
1840sPastor of South Congregational Church in Boston
1843On September 4, married Hannah Dane Sargent, they lived on Beech Street in Boston.
1855 Harvard Plummer Professor of Christian Morals
1855Obtained his brother's and sister's shares of the estate at "Forty Acres" so that he would inherit it himself, when his father died.
1864 Inherited "Forty Acres", used it as a summer home
1861Entered priesthood of Episcopal church and became rector of Emmanuel Church in Boston's Back Bay
1861-1869Mission work, established Mission Chapel at Ternor Street and the Church of the Good Shepard
1869Appointed first Bishop of Central New York, moved to Syracuse
1904Died in Hadley on July 11

During his life, Bishop Huntington published numerous books and pamphlets, as well as weekly newspaper columns and many articles. He did editorial work for the Christian Register, the Monthly Religious Magazine, the Church Monthly, and The Gospel Messanger. Frederic Dan spoke and wrote on social readjustments and the relations of labor and capital. He was president of the Christian Social Union and the Church Association for the Advancement of the Interests of Labor.

The Bishop was also involved in raising funds for the erection of a number of institutions in the Syracuse area. These included the Protestant Hospital, the House of the Good Shepard, St. John's Military School for boys, St. Andrews Divinity School, and the Keeble School for girls.

Frederic Dan Huntington and his family loved the old home at "Forty Acres" in Hadley. They spent every summer there, usually arriving in June and leaving in September or sometimes October. Frederic Dan kept the farm running, with a caretaker to oversee things in the winter. During his time in the area, Bishop Huntington was closely involved in the beginnings of Grace Episcopal Church in Amherst. He and his wife are known to have been good friends of the Dickinson family.

Children: See biographical sketches for each
George Putnam
Arria Sargent
Charles Edward- Born October 2, 1852, died October 17, 1852 in Roxbury
James Otis Sargent
William- Born July 1856, died the same day, in Hadley
Ruth Gregson- See Ruth Huntington Sessions
Mary Lincoln

Frederic Dan Huntington's papers are of interest, because he was a very prominent member of the Episcopal church who did a great deal for its growth and expansion. His papers help document his conversion from Unitarianism to the Episcopal church. Bishop Huntington was also a well known resident of the Hadley area. His friendship with the Dickinson family is of particular interest to researchers, but unfortunately there does not seem to be much documentation of this friendship in this collection. His correspondence with the siblings of his very large family, is a useful source for information on family history and relationships in the early 19th century.

Frederic Dan Huntington's papers fill BOXES 22-31, occupying almost four linear feet of space. The collection contains two boxes of outgoing correspondence from Frederic Dan to various family members. There are five full folders of letters to his sister Bethia between the 1840s-60s, three folders to his father, three to his mother 1830s-40s, and five folders to son George between 1860 and 1901. There are also letters to his other siblings and to his children. See also BOX 175, legal size materials, for 1830s letters to his brother John. A small amount of incoming correspondence is included, mostly about curch related business.

A box of miscellaneous manuscripts includes his first sermon preached at the dedication of the North Hadley school house. Another box of printed material by Frederic Dan, contains a list of his published works, written by him in the 1850s. There is also a bibliography of his work, done in the 1960s. This box contains clippings and articles written by him.

The box of printed material about him contains clippings about him. Another box includes obituaries and memorials about Frederic Dan and his son George in 1904.

The photograph unit, BOX 134, includes many pictures of Frederic Dan and his family. His portraits are on display at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House.

BOXES 29-31 contain pamphlets and booklets printed by the Episcopal church. Most of these are written by Frederic Dan, but some were simply saved by him. A carton of pamphlets of the annual conventions of the Diocese of Central New York is stored in the museum office. On display at the museum are diplomas, portraits, and other memorabilia.

The Amherst College Archives hold several folders on Frederic Dan in the Class of 1839 biographical file, as well as many books and pamphlets published by him.

Letters from Frederic Dan Huntington to Susan Dickinson are in the Houghton Library at Harvard. A folder of notes on his relationship with the Dickinson's is included in the box of printed material about him (BOX 27).

For more letters and information about his life, Arria Sargent Huntington'sMemoirs and Letters of Frederic Dan Huntington should be consulted.

In the Jones Library Boltwood Room in Amherst are a number of clippings about Frederic Dan Huntington preaching in Amherst in the 1850s and 60s. Also there is a pamphlet about Frederic Dan Huntington called "An Appreciation", written by Rev. George Chalmers Richmond in 1908.

Frederic Dane Huntington (1889-1940)

Freddie Huntington was born December 5, 1889, in Ashfield, Massachusetts, the youngest child of George and Lilly Huntington. His father died when he was only four years old and he was supported through school by his mother and older brothers.

Below is a list of the important events of his life:

1905-1906St. Paul's School, Concord, N.H.
1912A.B. Harvard
1915Harvard LL.B. and admitted to Bar
1915-1916Practiced law in Boston for Choate, Hall, and Stewart, living in Lexington, Massachusetts
1915-1917Boston Athletic Association hockey team
1916Sargent of Artillery, Massachusetts National Guard in Mexico
1917-1919Overseas as Captain of Battery A 101st Field Artillery, 26th Division
1919April, Detailed as Judge Advocate after the Armistice
1919August, returned to United States
1923-1940Assistant treasurer, Real Silk Hoisery Company, New York City, living in Bedford Hills, N.Y.
1924February 9, married Elsie Entress. They had no children.
1940January 7, died at Hadley
1948Elsie E. Huntington died

Freddie Huntington's papers fill one carton, BOX 98. There are a few outgoing letters to each of his siblings. One full folder of letters to James Huntington, mostly in the 1920s, tell of plans for fixing up the house in Hadley. There are four folders of letters to his mother, Lilly. The bulk of these fall between 1915-1925, a number of them having been written while he was in Europe fighting in WWI. There are two folders of correspondence and other material concerning the hockey team Frederic played on in 1916 and 17. Six folders contain papers from his years in the military and include two folders of maps and orders of the 101st Field Artillery. At the back of the box are also about ten outgoing letters from his wife Elsie. See also the separate series of M. Paul Huntington papers, BOX 90. See the photographs BOX 139. See James L. HuntingtonBOX 82 about "Forty Acres", for correspondence with Frederic about the division of "Forty Acres" in 1929. For an account of his death, see letters between his brothers James and Constant in BOX 65, James L. Huntington Correspondence-outgoing.

George Putnam Huntington (1844-1904)

George Huntington, the first child of Frederic Dan and Hannah Huntington, was born on July 3, 1844. He grew up in the Boston area, attending Cambridge High School. During summer vacations, he often spent time at "Forty Acres" in Hadley. George followed in his father's footsteps to become an Episcopal minister. Unfortunately, his career and life were fairly short. For he died on the 11th of July 1904, only a few days after he turned 60. This day was a sad one for the Huntington family. Frederic Dan Huntington was in Hadley at the time and had been steadily failing in health due to his age. Son George, at home in Hanover, had been ill for several weeks, perhaps with typhoid fever. On the morning of the 11th, Frederic Dan passed away. Four hours later, before the telegram with this news had even reached Hanover, George died, following in his footsteps once again.

Below is a list of the important dates in his life:

1864Graduated from Harvard
1864-1865 Taught school in Faribault, Minnesota
1865(?)Entered Berkeley Divinity School, Middletown, Connecticut
1868Ordained Deacon
1869-1884First Rector of St. Paul's Church, Malden, Massachusetts. He organized the parish and had the first church built
1874April 16, married Lilly St. Agnan Barrett of Malden
1881Published The Treasury of the Psalter
1884Resigned from St. Paul's due to failing health. Moved to Ashfield, Massachusetts and became rector of St. John's Church
1886While rectory being rebuilt, the family lived at "Forty Acres." They also travelled there frequently during other summers.
1891Moved to New Hampshire and became rector of St. Thomas Church, Hanover
1896Became instructor of Hebrew at Dartmouth College
1890sFrom around this time, until his death, George was also in charge of organized missions in Norwich, Vermont, Lebanon, New Hampshire, and at St. Peter's by the Sea in Ogunquit, Maine. The family owned a house on the beach in Ogunquit and spent most of the summer there.
1903Published John Ruskin's Comments on the Divina Commedia
1904Died in Hanover on July 11, buried in Hadley

Children: See biographical sketches for each
Henry Barrett
Constant Davis
Elizabeth- Born and died 1879
James Lincoln
Michael Paul
Charles- Born and died 1885
Catharine Sargent
Frederic Dane

George Huntington's papers fill six linear feet of space in BOXES 40-47. There is one letter size box of outgoing correspondence to his family. This contains seven folders to Lilly Barrett Huntington, three of which date before their marriage 1870-73. These are interesting in documenting their early relationship and courtship. George's will and burial wishes, written in 1903, are also contained in this letters outgoing box.

Incoming correspondence to George in the 1860s is in a letter size box in folders by the year, alphabetically arranged within. Many of these letters are from friends who he worked with in Faribault, Minnesota. A carton of letters recieved 1870-1904, is arranged in folders by decade and alphabetically within that by the name of the writer. Some people who wrote many letters, have individual folders. These letters are both personal and professional, with some overlap, as many of his friends were also in the church.

There is one carton of religious manuscripts, which contains many sermons. These have few dates and are in folders as they were found tied in bundles. Another box contains religious and miscellaneous manuscripts. There are a number of notebooks with material for sermons and several notebooks of pressed flowers and botanical notes. There are also four folders of printed material, including clippings and articles by George. See also BOX 28 for obituaries and memorials of Frederic Dan and George Huntington, 1904. See also the miscellaneous legal and oversized boxes.

One carton of miscellaneous materials includes financial papers of miscellaneous dates, church finances, Harvard material, as well as George's work on Dante and The Treasury of the Psalter.

The final carton contains financial papers, which are mostly personal, household bills and receipts from 1807 to 1904. These are divided roughly into folders by date, but are not in exact chronological order. They are valuable in providing information about the Huntington family household in the late 19th century, during the childhoods of James, Catharine, and their brothers.

BOX 23, Frederic Dan Huntington correspondence-outgoing, includes five folders of letters to his son George. Hannah Sargent Huntington's papers also contain four boxes of correspondence outgoing to son, George, between 1864 and 1904, BOXES 33-36.

See the photographsBOX 137. See also the miscellaneous oversized materials box for some of his writings, and an 1884 passport for his trip to Cuba. See BOX 175, legal size materials. See boxes of pamphlets at the museum, for Diocese of New Hampshire Annual Conventions and other church publications related to George Huntington.

Hannah Dane Sargent Huntington (1822-1910)

Hannah, daughter of Epes and Mary Lincoln Sargent, was born in Boston on November 21, 1822. She grew up in Boston and Roxbury. On September 4, 1843, she was married to Frederic Dan Huntington, who was at that time, a Unitarian minister. In the 1860s, he converted to the Episcopal church and Hannah apparently joined him. They moved to Syracuse, New York in 1869, when Frederic became Bishop of Central New York.

Hannah Huntington was a well liked and respected citizen of Syracuse and was very active as the Bishop's wife. She was also involved in a number of social groups in the area.

The family spent each summer on the family farm at "Forty Acres", usually arriving in June and staying through September or October. At the end of most summers, Hannah would make trips to Boston and New York to visit her brothers and sisters, before returning to Syracuse.

Hannah died in Syracuse on February 22, 1910.

For more information on Hannah Sargent Huntington see the biographical sketch written by her daughter Arria, which can be found in the office of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House.

Hannah's papers, in BOXES 32-37, consist mostly of outgoing correspondence to her son George between 1860 and 1904. These occupy 2 linear feet of space. In one additional box (BOX 32), is correspondence to other family members. Incoming correspondence includes congratulations on her 50th anniversary in 1893 and letters of sympathy received in 1904, upon the deaths of her husband and son. See the lovely hand painted book made for the 50th anniversary by an unidentified family member (BOX 37).

See photographsBOX 134. See also the oversized materials box for Hannah's Daughters of the American Revolution certificate of 1894. Her portrait, done in 1843, hangs in the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House.

Helen Sophia Mills Huntington (1806-1844)

Helen Sophia was born August 24, 1806 in Northampton. She was the daughter of Elijah Hunt and Harriette Blake Mills. On October 28, 1827, she married Charles Phelps Huntington. They resided in Northampton, where she died on March 30, 1844, having lived there all her life and birthed seven children.

Children: See list under Charles Phelps Huntington

The Charles Phelps Huntington family box (BOX 18) contains one letter from Helen to her mother and one letter received. There are also five folders of other members of the Mills family in this box.

Henry Barrett Huntington (1875-1965)

Barrett, the first child of George and Lilly Huntington, was born in Malden, Massachusetts on January 17, 1875. In 1893, he was the first of the sons to attend Harvard. After graduation, he taught at Harvard, Dartmouth, and finally Brown Universtiy. Barrett was a professor of English composition and literature, and specialized in argumentation and debate. He was a member of the Phi Beta Kappa and Delta Upsilon fraternities.

Barrett was very fond of the Hadley farm at "Forty Acres" and after his grandmother's death in 1910, he tried for a few years to run it as a dairy. This venture proved unsuccessful, however, as Barrett chose to continue living in Providence and commute to Hadley only as needed. Later in life, he apparently owned a summer home in Heath, Massachusetts.

Below is a list of important events in his life:

1891-1893St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hampshire
1893-1897Harvard
1897After graduation, took a summer trip to Europe.
1898-1902Taught English and philosophy at Harvard and Dartmouth
1902Assistant Professor of English at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
1905Published "Principles of Argumentation and Debate"
1905June 13, married Alice Howland Mason. She was born December 1, 1880 and was the daughter of Eugene and Elizabeth (Arnold) Mason.
1946Alice Huntington died on July 7
1965Barrett died

Children:
Elizabeth- Born 1906, married Randolph Dyer in 1927
Arria Sargent- Born 1909
George Putnam- Born 1909, became an Episcopal minister
Mary Hopkins- Born 1915, married Lowell Pettit.

Barrett Huntington's papers, in BOX 60, consist mainly of outgoing correspondence to family members. There are eleven folders of letters to his mother Lilly Huntington, between the 1880s and the 1920s. There are seven folders to brother, James, 1880s-1960s, and three folders to father, George, 1880s-1904. Also contained in this box are a few letters outgoing from Barrett Huntington's children and grandchildren.

See photographsBOX 139. There are many photos of the children. See also Michael Paul Huntington papers, BOX 90, for letters from Barrett's family in the 1930s and 40s. See also the box of James Huntington and "Forty Acres", BOX 82. This contains correspondence from Barrett about the division of "Forty Acres" in 1929. See boxes of his horticulture and German magazines at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House.

James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)

James, third son of George and Lilly Huntington, was born in Malden on May 30, 1880. He grew up in Ashfield, Massachusetts and Hanover, New Hampshire. Jimmy was an early obstetrician and gynecologist and was instrumental in developing the procedure for caesarian sections. Later in life, he became very interested in the family history and home at "Forty Acres." Jimmy spent much of his time and all of his money researching and preserving the house.

Below is a list of the important events of his life:

1895-1896Attended St. John's Military School, Manlius, New York
1901Summer at Arrowpoint Camp, New Preston, Connecticut
1902Graduated from Dartmouth College
1902-1903 Taught at St. John's School, Manlius and lived in Syracuse with his grandparents Frederic Dan and Hannah Huntington
1903Moved to Cambridge
1904Summer at Cloyne House, Newport, R.I.
1907Graduated from Harvard Medical School
1909Studied medicine in Germany
1910Began practice of obstetrics and gynecology in Boston
1911Married Sarah Higginson Pierce on June 1
1911-1915Staff of Boston City Hospital
1911-1922Assistant in Obstetrics at Harvard Medical School
1911-1922Staff of Boston Lying-in Hospital
1922-1923 Consulting obstetrician at Cambridge Hospital
1921Head of obstetrical department at Mt. Auburn Hospital
1929Aquired full ownership of "Forty Acres"
1940Began practices in Hadley and Northampton and was consulting obstetrician at the Cooley Dickinson Hospital
1943Moved to "Forty Acres" in Hadley
1944Divorced Sarah Pierce on June 28
1944Married Agnes Genevieve Keefe Huntington on December 29
1955Porter-Phelps-Huntington Foundation formed House and contents donated by James L. Huntington
1968Died on May 5

Children:
Benjamin Lincoln- See his biographical sketch
John Higginson- See his biographical sketch

The papers of James L. Huntington fill BOXES 66-84. He seems to have saved most all his papers and they document quite fully, his life, profession, and work at "Forty Acres." He is of interest as an early advocate for historic preservation. His efforts to save his ancestral home were truely remarkable, as he spent all of his spare time and money on it. Dr. Huntington's professional papers and correspondence are also of interest to researchers of medical history.

James Huntington saved most of his own papers in manilla envelopes and labelled their contents. When these papers were processed, they were kept in the same order that he had saved them and were simply moved from the manilla envelopes to archival folders. (When Dr. Huntington's exact words were used in labelling, they were placed in quotation marks.) The original order was changed only for incoming correspondence from other family members. These were sorted and put in the box of the person who wrote the letter. Incoming correspondence from non-family was kept as James Huntington had saved it. The folders were divided and placed in boxes by type of letter (professional, childhood friends, club related, related to "Forty Acres", etc.) The container listing will help locate these types within the boxes.

BOX 65 contains outgoing correspondence from James L. Huntington. There are 12 folders of letters to sister Catharine Huntington, mostly in the 1950s-60s. These tell of James' work on "Forty Acres" and plans for its future. Six folders to brother, Constant from 1895 to 1902, relate school life and plans for future careers, as well as some information about time spent at "Forty Acres." Another folder to Constant in the 1940s, discusses plans for preserving "Forty Acres." There are also four folders of letters to his mother, Lilly Barrett Huntington, between the 1890s-1905.

The bulk of James L. Huntington's papers is incoming correspondence, the bulk of which date from the 1920s-60s. In BOX 66, are letters from miscellaneous relatives and letters about relatives. BOX 67 contains incoming correspondence from childhood friends, including friends from Hanover and various summer camps. Professional correspondence, from patients and other doctors, is in BOX 76. In BOX 75, is other professional material, including medical papers and lectures by Dr. Huntington.

James Huntington belonged to many clubs and socities. Incoming correspondence from club members, as well as club business can be found in BOXES 72-74. This mostly dates between 1920 and 1950.

Financial papers of James, Sarah, and Genevieve Huntington fill BOXES 77-79. The latter two boxes contain bank statements and checkbooks of various family members and these are not in order.

BOXES 80a, 80b, and 81, contain journals and scrapbooks kept by James Lincoln Huntington, 1922-1964. These document his visits to the house at "Forty Acres", as well as architectural changes, and efforts to raise money for its preservation. Dr. Huntington wrote faithfully and in great detail, on every trip to Hadely. These books and the photographs they include, are invaluable in documenting the 20th century history of the Porter-Phelps-Huntignton House.

BOX 82 is also very important to the history of the house. It contains incoming and outgoing correspondence about preservation of the House, the search for funding, and the incorporation of "Forty Acres" between 1947-1953. Letters on 1955, about disolving the Corporation, discuss auction of the furniture, closing the house, and returning money to donors. In these, James expresses his sorrow at the prospect of closing the museum and the apparent failure of his dream. Early Foundation business correspondence of the 1950s-60s, is also in BOX 82. For additional Foundation correspondence to and from James L. Hutnington, see the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Foundation office files boxes.

BOX 83 is an important part of the collection, as it contains family geneological and biographical information, collected by James Huntington. This box also includes his own biographical sketches and obituaries. The Huntington Family Association box (BOX 84) contains more family material. This is mostly correspondence with James L. Huntington about the association, in the 1920s-50s.

There are many photographs and shapshots of James Huntington, his family, and friends in BOXES 140-142.

See also, Michael Paul Huntington papers, BOX 90. See the legal and oversize materials boxes (BOX 173 and BOX 175).

James Otis Sargent Huntington (1854-1935)

James Otis Sargent Huntington was born July 23, 1854 in Roxbury, Massachusetts. He was the younger son of Frederic Dan and Hannah Huntington. During his childhood, he experienced his father's conversion from the Unitarian to the Episcopal church and then his appointment as Bishop of Central New York State. James later followed in his father's foot-steps to become a clergyman. However, his ideas and goals differed greatly from the Bishop's and this caused some conflict between father and son, particularly over James' involvement in the Oxford Movement.

After much dilemma, James chose a monastic life. He is said to have come to understand his calling while at a retreat conducted by Canon Little at St. Clement's in Philadelphia in November of 1880. James went to live at the Holy Cross Clergy House in New York, until 1884. He then took the vows and founded the Order of the Holy Cross, along with two friends, Robert Dod and James Cameron.

During the Order's early years, Father Huntington worked in the poorest sections of New York's East Side. He was also greatly concerned with labor issues, being one of the founders of the Church Association for the Advancements of the Interests of Labor and an early member of the Knights of Labor.

Under Father Huntington's leadership as Superior, the Order of the Holy Cross grew and in 1904, the Mother House was built in West Park, New York. Other accomplishments of James Otis Sargent Huntington include founding St. Faith's home for wayward girls, St. Andrew's School at Sewanee, Kent School, and the Mission in Liberia, Africa.

Below is a list of some of the major events of his life:

1868Roxbury Latin School
1869-1871St. John's School, Manlius, New York
1871-1875Harvard
1876-1879St. Andrew's Divinity School, Syracuse
1876Summer walking tour through Scotland
1878Ordained Deacon and took over services at Calvary Church, Syracuse
1880Ordained Priest by his father Bishop Frederic Dan Huntington and took full charge of Calvary Church
1881-1889Living at Holy Cross Clergy House and working at Holy Cross Church in New York City's East Side
1884 Founded Order of the Holy Cross
1889 Missionary work in western New York state
1890sThe Order moved to Westminster
1904Order of the Holy Cross Mother House built, West Park, New York
1935 Died in New York on July 29, buried at West Park in St. Augustine's Chapel

James Huntington's papers, in BOXES 56-58, consist of one box of correspondence outgoing to various family members. There are three folders of letters to his father Frederic Dan, three to brother George, and three to nephew James. These letters are important, because they document the development of his religious views and the early years of the Order of the Holy Cross. Another box contains material on the schools James Otis Sargent attended, as well as articles written by him in the 1880s and 90s. A third box has clippings about him and the order of the Holy Cross, most of these are obituaries and memorials of 1935. See the photographsBOXES 131 and 136 for many pictures of him throughout his lifetime. In the office of the Porter- Phelps-Huntington House is a set of Holy Cross magazines and some other pamphlets pertaining to James O.S. Huntington and his work.

See also BOX 66, James Lincoln Huntington Correspondence incoming about family members. This contains material relating to his article called the "Life and Letters of James Otis Sargent Huntington." See also the box of printed material about Frederic Dan Huntington, BOX 27, for an article called "The Bishop's Children", which contains much information about James' life and work.

John Higginson Huntington (1916-1987)

John, the second son of James and Sarah Huntington, was born in Boston on May 12, 1916. He grew up in Brookline, spending much of the summer in Hadley at "Forty Acres." In the 1940s, John went to London and settled there.

Below is a list of the important events of his life:

1926-1928?Attended the Dexter School in Brookline.
1931-1933William Penn Charter School, Germantown, Pa.
1934-1936Phillips Exeter Academy, involved in theater, journalism, and Lantern Club.
1935+1936Summers in the Bahamas
1936-1940Harvard
1937Summer in Germany
1940Living in Chicago, working for a newspaper
1942-1943American Field Service, apparently in an ambulance unit in Africa.
1940s?In London working for G.P. Putnam's Sons (with his uncle Constant)
1947July 7, married Kathleen Margaret Chadburn in London
1987Died in the English Lakes District, in November

Children:
Anne Chadburn
Peter
Paul
Benjamin

John Huntington's papers fill BOXES 103-107. These 1930s-40s papers were not fully sorted. BOX 103 contains outgoing letters, stories, and articles written by John. For more stories, see the legal and oversized materials boxes. The outgoing correspondence is mostly to his parents and there are nine full folders of this from the 1930s-60s. One carton, BOX 104, has incoming correspondence from school friends in the 1930s and 40s, these are not in alphabetical order. Two cartons contain school papers, including printed material about his schools and his school work and notebooks. There is half a carton of miscellaneous material.

There are also a few letters from John's children to their grandfather, James Lincoln Huntington.

See the photographsBOX 143 for photos of John and his children, as well as many of his school friends, and snapshots taken by him. See also the journals of his father James L. Huntington for more photos (BOXES 80a, 80b, 81)

See also BOX 75 for "Out of the Deep" written by James Huntington about John's health.

John Whiting Huntington (1809-1832)

John (often called Whiting), the sixth child of Dan and Elizabeth Huntington was born on May 28, 1809. He grew up in Middletown, Connecticut and then Hadley. From 1829 to 1832, John attended Harvard. He was examined for his Bachelor's Degree, but died before commencement.

The collection contains no papers of John Whiting. However, there are a number of letters written to him by his brothers and sisters, which can be found in their own boxes. (BOXES 17, 19, 20, 23)

Lilly St. Agnan Barrett Huntington (1848-1926)

Lilly Barrett was born in Malden, Massachusetts on December 21, 1848. She was the daughter of Henry Barrett and Lucy Theodora Gellineau Stearns. Her father was the wealthy owner of a dye house. Due to tuberculosis in his lungs, he spent winters near Mobile, Alabama and summers in the White Mountains and Lilly often went with him. When at home, she attended finishing school in Roxbury.

Lilly's parents were Unitarians, but Lilly became interested in the Episcopal faith through her mother's cousin by marriage, Hamilton Willis. Lilly was an early member of the St. Paul's parish in Malden, founded by George Huntington in the late 1860s. She became good friends with her rector. On April 16, 1874, Lilly was baptised and confirmed and then married to George Huntington in Emmanuel Church, Boston. Lilly's father bought them a house in Malden, near St. Paul's Church on the corner of Washington and Florence Streets.

There the family lived and grew until 1884, when due to failing health, George gave up his parish and the family moved out of the city. They moved to Ashfield, Massachusetts with their four children and George became rector of St. John's Church. This home was closer to the family farm at "Forty Acres" in Hadley, and Lilly and her children often spent time their during the summer.

In 1891, George was appointed rector of St. Thomas Church in Hanover, New Hampshire. There, the family, with six children, remained until George's death in 1904. Lilly was a devoted rector's wife. She had many friends in Hanover and was involved in the town's social circles with such activities as the Women's Literary Society. Lilly spent most summers in Ogunquit, Maine where the family had a summer house near George's parish of St. Peter's by the Sea. Lilly had friends in Ogunquit and continued to own the beach house there for a number of years after her husband's death.

In 1904, Lilly was 56 years old, but she was the mother of several young children. The widow of a minister did not receive a large pension, so Lilly and the younger children were supported largely by the older sons. Family correspondence contains discussion of their financial situation and although she had help from her son's, Lilly seems to have handled her affairs quite aptly. She certainly had a share of the Barrett family money, which her lawyer brother, Harry, helped her to manage.

George died in July and the Hanover church needed to fill their rectory immediately, so Lilly and her children had to move from their house. They spent the remainder of that summer nearby, in East Rindge, New Hampshire. In the fall, with some assistance and advice from her sons, Lilly purchased a house in Leicester, Massachusetts. There she lived for several years with her younger children Paul, Catharine, and Freddie, until each one went off to college.

In 1908 or 1909, Lilly Huntington moved to 237 Massachusetts Avenue in Lexington. She lived there until about 1920, when she purchased a house in Boston at 66 Pinckney Street on Beacon Hill. There she spent the winter months, joined often by her daughter Catharine.

In 1921, her children improved and modernized the family home at "Forty Acres" to make it a suitable summer home for their mother. Lilly happily spent her last summers there. In 1926, She passed away, while staying with her son Paul at his home in Millsboro, Delaware.

Children: (see separate biographical sketches for each)
Henry Barrett
Constant Davis
Elizabeth- Born and died 1879
James Lincoln
Michael Paul
Charles- Born and died 1885
Catharine
Frederic Dane

Lilly Huntington's papers are contained in BOXES 48-54. Two of these have outgoing correspondence to her family. There are eight full folders to her son Constant, between 1892-1907. The two kept up a very consistent correspondence, see Constant Huntington's papers for many letters to Lilly. There are also five full folders to her husband, George and four folders to son James. One and a half boxes of incoming correspondence to Lilly Huntington, consist mostly of personal letters, many of which are church related. One box of miscellaneous material has some manuscripts written by Lilly. The box of 1920s financial papers also includes her will of 1924. See also the boxes of legal and oversized materials. See photographsBOX 137.

Lilly Huntington seems to have saved almost all the letters she received from her children and they wrote often. So the letters she received (found in the boxes of outgoing correspondnece of the various children) document quite fully, her relationship to her children in the early 20th century. This relationship is particularly interesting, as Lilly was widowed while her children were still young.

Mary Dwight Huntington (1815-1839)

Mary, the ninth child of Dan and Elizabeth Phelps Huntington, was born on April 18, 1815, in Middletown, Connecticut, but during her first year, the family moved to her mother's family home at "Forty Acres" in Hadley. From 1831 to 1833, she attended Miss Emma Willard's School in Troy, New York, along with several of her sisters. In 1834-35, Mary Huntington was living in Oswego, New York. She died on October 14, 1839, at only 24 years of age.

Mary Huntington's few papers are found in the box of Dan and Elizabeth Huntington's Daughters, BOX 20. There are letters from her to various family members during the 1820s and 30s, most of them were written while she was away at school in Troy.

Mary Elizabeth Huntington (1840-1923)

Mary, daughter of Charles Phelps Huntington, was born in Northampton on March 19, 1940. She never married and died in 1923.

There are a few papers of Mary E. Huntington in BOX 18 of Charles Phelps Huntington's family. These include her reminiscences and obituary, as well as a poem written on her 82 birthday by nephew Mark Anthony DeWolfe Howe. Her portrait hangs in the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House.

Mary Lincoln Huntington (1861-1936)

Mary, the youngest child of Frederic Dan and Hannah Huntington, was born in Boston, November 15, 1861. In 1869, when she was eight years old, the family moved to Syracuse, New York where her father was an Episcopal Bichop. Mary never married and continued to live with her parents throughout their lives. She was active in the parish of Calvary Church in Syracuse, conducting the Girl's Friendly Society, training the choir, and visiting the poor and the sick.

Later in life, Mary lived with her sister Ruth at the Phelps Farm in Hadley where she apparently had a small "bungelow" of her own. During the winter months, Mary lived with Ruth on Belmont Avenue in Northampton. She died there on January 12, 1936, after a long illness.

BOX 59 is one small box of letters from Mary Huntington to family members, written throughout her lifetime. See photographsBOX 136. See BOX 90 of Michael Paul Huntington.

Michael Paul St. Agnan Huntington (1882-1967)

Michael Paul St. Agnan Huntington (known as Paul) was born in Malden, Massachusetts on August 26, 1882. He was the fourth son of George and Lilly Huntington. Chronically ill as a child, Paul did not go away to boarding school, as his brothers had. When not in the hospital, he stayed at home with his mother, younger brother, and sister in Hanover, New Hampshire.

Below is a list of the important events of his life:

1902Graduated from Hanover High School
1902-1904Special Student Harvard University
1906-1907Worchester Polytecnical Institute
1914-1918Cambridge Theological Seminary
1917Ordained
1918Emmamuel Church, Boston
1917-1922St. Paul's Cathedral
1922Married Lona Marie Goode, daughter of Victor and Lottie Moon Goode of Richmond, Virginia, on September 30.
1921-1925Missionary in charge, All Saint's Church, Norton, Virginia
1925-1931Missionary in charge Millsboro, Delaware
1931-1940sRector of Christ Church, Red Hook, New York
1950s-1960sRichmond, Virginia
1950s-67Summer house in Pelham, Massachusetts, connected with Grace Church, Amherst
1967Died

Children:
William Paul- See biographical sketch
David Mack Goode- Born 1926, living in Wisconsin 1988. Charles Phelps- Born 1928, killed in automobile accident 1937
Paul Huntington's papers total 4 1/2 linear feet. They are divided into two parts. One is a part of the overall collection of family papers, BOXES 88-89. This consists of outgoing correspondnece from Paul to his family. There are five folders of letters to brother James from the 1890s through the 1960s. Paul also wrote a few letters to each of his other siblings, mostly in the 1890s and early 1900s. There are six full folders of letters to his mother between 1900 and 1925, the bulk of these fall in the 1920s. These tell of his schooling and his work as an Episcopal minister of which his mother was very proud. These papers also include Paul's obituary, as well as a few outgoing letters from his wife and children.

See the boxes of his brothers and sister for letters written to Paul. Correspondence with James L. Huntington contains information about the house in the early 20th century.

See also the Sargent Family BOX 125, for correspondence between Paul and Constant about the John O. Sargent will dispute in 1946-47.

The other part of Paul's papers is kept as a separate unit, due to its different provenance and history. This separate set of papers was brought to Hadley by son David, when Paul's house in Pelham was sold. These were then stored in the attic of the woodshed until the summer of 1987. As the original order of these papers was more clearly intact, it was decided to keep them separate. These papers consisted mainly of incoming correspondence to Paul. They were saved as they had been received. Therefore, researchers studying any member of Paul Huntington's family, should examine this separate series to find letters that person wrote to Paul.

This separate unit, BOXES 90-93, includes one carton of Paul's sermons of the 1920s-40s. There are two cartons of incoming correspondence. One contains those from family members, mostly in the 1920s-40s. There are eight folders of letters from William Paul Huntington to his parents in the 1940s, when he was a soldier in WWII. The second box of incoming correspondence is from miscellaneous friends and these are not in order. This box also contains two folders of financial papers, including check books from the 1950s.

See the photographsBOX 139. See a pamphlet about Amherst's Grace Church, written by Paul Huntington, in the stacks of the Amherst College library.

Sarah Higginson Pierce Huntington (1885-?)

Born January 8, 1885, in Brookline, Sarah was the second daughter of Dean and Louisa Pierce (see Pierce family section). "Sally" lived her whole life in Brookline and married Dr. James L. Huntington there on June 1, 1911. They lived at 311 Marlborough Street.

Sally ran the Canitoe Gift and Antique Shop out of their house. In the 1930s, she was involved in financial endeavors and owned a large number of stocks and investments.

She frequently came with her husband to "Forty Acres." However, Sally did not share his love for Hadley and often stayed home instead.

The two were divorced in 1944. In 1945 Sally married Stanley Leslie Balmer. She died in 1970 in California.

Sarah Pierce Huntington's papers, in BOXES 85-86, include correspondence outgoing to various relatives. There are four full folders to her son John, while he was at school in the 1930s. (The dates for these were taken from the envelopes, most of which were discarded.) Sarah wrote about 10 letters to her mother-law Lilly Huntington. There is only one letter to her husband, James.

The bulk of Sarah's papers are financial. These are contained in one carton (BOX 86) and date between 1928 and 1943. There are stocks, receipts, financial statements, and tax information. See also the bank statements and checkbooks BOXES 78-79.

See the photographsBOX 140.

Theodore Gregson Huntington (1813-1880s?)

Theodore, the eighth child of Dan and Elizabeth Huntington, was born March 18, 1813 in Middletown, Connecticut. At the age of three, he moved with the family to Hadley. On February 17, 1841, Theodore married Elizabeth Sumner (1816-1885). An 1873 map of the area lists T.G. Huntington as a "market gardener and small fruit grower." He apparantly built a house on his father's land in Hadley, along what is now Huntington Road.

Later in life he lived in Enfield, Connecticut and both he and his wife died there. They had no children.

Theodore G. Huntington's papers, in BOX 21, include his "Sketches of family life in Hadley." These were written in 1881, as letters to Helen F. Huntington Quincy. In 1905, Theodore's niece, Arria Huntington, used these prose sketches in her book, Under a Colonial Rooftree. Copies of Theodore's poetry of 1884 are also included in his papers.

These letters are extremely valuable, because they provide an early account of the "Forty Acres" house, farm, and family history.

Theophilus Parsons Huntington (1811-1862)

Theophilus, the seventh child of Dan and Elizabeth Huntington, was born in Middletown on July 11, 1811. When he was 5 years old, the family moved to Hadley.

Around 1840, he married Eliza Fitch Lyon (1817-1892). In 1833, he had received some land from his father and Theophilus apparently lived in Hadley until his death on July 20, 1862.

Children:
Walter Elliot- Born 1842
Maria Whiting- Born 1845
Edward Dwight- Born 1857

The most interesting of Theophilus' papers are the accounts of his farm in 1855-56. His one piece of incoming correspondence is in BOX 19, the box of Dan and Elizabeth Huntington's sons. This box also contains a few letters to him from his brothers. See Dan Huntington's BOX 16 for the 1833 deed of land.

William Edwards Huntington (1844-1930)

William, son of William Pitkin Huntington, was born in Hillsboro, Illinois, on July 30, 1844. He received several degrees, including an A.B. from the University of Wisconsin in 1870, an S.T.D. and PhD. from Boston University in 1873 and 1881. During the Civil War, he served in the Wisconsin Infantry.

In 1876, William married for the first time to Emma Caroline Speare. She died the following year and in 1881, William married her sister Ella Maria. He lived in Newton, Massachusetts. Between 1904 and 1911, he was president of Boston University, he then served as Dean of the Graduate School until 1917, and President Emeritus until his death. William died in Newton in 1930.

Children:
Raymond Edwards
Emma Caroline
Genevieve
Miriam

William E. Huntington's papers are found with those of his father in BOX 19, Dan and Elizabeth Huntington's sons. They include three outgoing letters and his obituary.

William Paul Huntington (1923-?)

William, the first child of Paul and Marie Huntington, was born in Norton, Virginia on December 25, 1923. He attended Kent School. During World War II, he fought in the Army from 1943-45. In 1948, William graduated from Amherst College. He married Frances Ellen Chittendon at Madison, Connecticut on July 8, 1950. The lived in Baltimore, Maryland.

William's papers are found in BOX 90, Michael Paul Huntington papers. They consist of eight full folders of letters to his parents in the 1940s, when he was fighting in the war. Although they do not give many details, they do tell a bit about army life. William's Amherst College commencement program and wedding invitation are also included. See the photographsBOX 139 for pictures of "Billy" as a child.

William Pitkin Huntington (1804-1885)

William, the third child of Dan and Elizabeth Huntington, was born on July 16, 1804 in Litchfield, Connecticut. He graduated from Harvard in 1824 and received his M.D. in 1835. William later attended Hickman Seminary. In the 1830s, he moved west. He married Lucy Edwards (1820- 1898) in 1839.

By 1848, the family lived in Illinois, Buffalo, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. William was a teacher and a Unitarian minister. He later became an Episcopalian. In the 1860s, he was doing missionary work in the west. In 1873, William was ordained Episcopal Deacon by his brother, Frederic Dan Huntington.

Late in life, the family moved back to Amherst, Massachusetts. William died there on March 7, 1885.

Children:
Lucy Bethia- Born 1840
Mary Catherine- Born 1842, died 1846
William Edwards- See biographical sketch
Elizabeth Whiting- Born 1846, died 1847
Helen Maria- Born 1848
Catherine Frances- Born 1850
Frederick Sargent- Born 1852, died 1888
Crace Martin- Born 1859
Theodore Gregson- Born 1859
Ellery Channing- Born 1865

William P. Huntington's papers are in the box of Dan and Elizabeth Huntington's sons, BOX 19. They include many letters to his sister Bethia in the 1820s-50s, along with some to his other siblings and his parents. There is also a folder of his sermons and religious notes of the 1870s-80s. These are interesting for research, as they are written during his time as a missionary preacher in the west. They also help to document his relationship as a part of this large family.

Along with his papers, are a few letters of his son William Edwards.

Benjamin Lincoln (1733-1810)

Benjamin was born on January 24, 1733, the son of Colonel Benjamin Lincoln and his wife Elizabeth. He spent most of his life in Hingham, Massachusetts and there he married Mary Cushing in 1756.

Lincoln's strong Whig tendencies made him an early advocate of independence and brought him appointments to several important posts, including representative of the General Court. On February 19, 1777, he was commissioned a Major General. In October of that year, Lincoln suffered an injury at Saratoga, when a riffle ball shattered his ankle. This caused him much discomfort and lamness later in life, but did not stop his military career.

Benjamin Lincoln was sent to Charlestown in 1778 to command the Southern army. However, he was unsuccessful and by May of 1780, he was forced to surrender the city. In June 1781, General Lincoln rejoined Washington. He was present at Yorktown and when Cornwallis surrendered on November 19, 1781, it was into Lincoln's hands that Cornwallis presented his sword. This gesture symbolically ended the Revolutionary War.

Under President Washington, Lincoln served as Secretary of War. In 1783, he retired briefly to Hingham. When Shay's Rebellion broke out in 1786, Governor James Bowdoin appointed Lincoln as commander of the Massachusetts militia. He was not unsympathetic to Daniel Shays and his followers. He made a number of overtures to Shays, but Shays' demands went beyond what Lincoln had authority to grant. On January 30, 1787, General Lincoln made one last attempt to make peace with Shays, but was refused. So on February 3 and 4, Lincoln's forces struck Shays' headquarters in Petersham and defeated the rebels.

In 1787, Benjamin Lincoln was made Lt. Governor of Massachusetts and later was the first Collector for the Port of Boston, retiring in 1809. One year later, Lincoln died in Hingham on May 9, 1810.

Children:
Abner- Graduated Harvard 1780, he was a school master and led the choir of Old Ship Church in Hingham, he married Hannah ___, their daughter Mary married Epes Sargent, see Mary Otis Lincoln Sargent biographical sketch
Anne?

Benjamin Lincoln's papers (BOX 118) are a valuable part of this collection. These include 8 outgoing letters, orders to march signed by him during the Revolutionary War, bills of landing for the Port of Boston, two documents of the Provincial Congress 1774-75, a few financial papers, and two deeds. Among these papers are copies of correspondence with George Washington and Samuel Huntington.

Caroline Stearns Barrett Littlefield (1850s?-1941)

Caroline was born in Malden, Massachusetts, the youngest child of Henry and Lucy Barrett. She grew up in Malden, attending grammar school at the Malden Centre School and graduating in 1875. Caroline received very high marks, but was not ranked in her class due to absences on account of her health. It is unclear what her trouble was, but later, during her teenage years, she suffered from scarlet fever. In 1899, Caroline married Howard Littlefield. He was a bookkeeper who worked for the American Agricultural Chemical Company in Boston. The Littlefields lived in Malden and had no children. Caroline died in 1941.

Papers of Caroline Littlefield are in BOX 119. There are 15 letters to sister Lilly Barrett Huntington between 1878 and 1900. A diary of 1875 is very interesting, as it is very detailed and frequently mentions her sister Lilly Huntington and her new babies. There are a few letters from Howard Littlefield to his Huntington nephews around 1905 and two letters to Lilly Huntington in the 1920s.

See photographsBOX 138. See also BOX 90 of Michael Paul Huntington's papers for letters from Howard Littlefield in the 1930s and 40s.

Emilie Macklot Sargent Paine (1855-1942)

Emilie Sargent was born in Davenport, Iowa, November 8, 1855. She grew up there until 1869, when her family moved west to Duluth Minnesota. There Emilie married Frederick William Paine in 1884. He was a banker who had been born in Michigan in 1856. The Paines remained in Duluth until their deaths. Emilie died in 1942. During summers, they seem to have spent time in New England, where they were close friends of George Huntington's family.

Children:
Mary Welles- See biographical sketch below
Rodney Charles- Born March 1887, died in April
Frederick Rodney- See biographical sketch below
William Sargent- Born 1893, died 1894

The papers of Emilie Paine are found in the Paine family box (BOX 120). They consist of about 20 outgoing letters to the George Huntington family, during the late 19th and early 20th century. There are also six outgoig letters from Frederick W. Paine. See photographsBOX 138. See also BOX 90 of Michael Paul Huntington's papers for letters from Frederick and Emilie in the 1930s and 40s.

Frederick Rodney Paine (1889-?)

Rodney Paine was born to Emilie and Frederick in 1889. He graduated from Princeton in 1912. During World War I, he was commissioned 1st Lieutenant in the U.S. Army. After the War, in 1921, Rodney married Anna Hooker who had graduated from Smith College the previous year. They lived in Duluth, where Rodney was superintendant of Jay Cooke State Park.

The collection contains no papers of Rodney Paine, but he is frequently mentioned in letters by other family members (BOX 120).

Mary Welles Paine (Worthen) (1886-?)

Mary Paine (or Molly), daughter of Emilie and Frederick Paine, was born in Duluth in 1886. She grew up in Duluth and was educated in Garden City, New Jersey at Saint Mary's School, between 1902 and 1905. During the summer she often spent time in New England, where she enjoyed visits with her "cousin" Catharine Huntington.

The collection contains letters written to Catharine while Molly was at school and these often mention a boy named Thatcher. So it is interesting to see that more than ten years later, on May 16, 1915, Mary Paine married this young man, Thatcher Washburn Worthen. He was born in 1886, graduated from Dartmouth and then received a degree from Amherst. In 1923, the couple was living in Hartford, Connecticut.

Children:
Elizabeth
and more ?

Mary Paine Worthen's papers are in BOX 120, the Paine family box. Most important are the letters to "cousin" Catharine Huntington between 1902-05. These tell of a teenage girl's friendships, school, and social life. There are also about 10 letters to other members of the Huntington family. In with letters to Lilly Huntington, is a copy of Mary's wedding invitation. See the photographsBOX 138. See also BOX 90 of Michael Paul Huntington's papers for letters from Mary in the 1930s and 40s.

Charles Phelps Sr. (1717-1789)

Charles Phelps was born on August 16, 1717, probably in Northampton. He was the son of bricklayer, Nathaniel (1678- 1747), who also carried the title of Lieutenant. Charles followed his father to become a successful bricklayer. He was also a lawyer in Hadley. In 1760 he was "read out" of the Hadley Congregational Church, because he would not attend communion. Shortly afterwards in 1764, he became an early resident of New Marlborough, Vermont. There Charles Phelps was a prominent member of the New York party against the "Green Mountain Boys."

On April 24, 1740, he married 25 year old Dorothy Root. She died September 11, 1777 and Charles soon remarried in November of 1778. His second wife was Esther (?) Kneeland of Boston, the widow of Timothy Kneeland. Charles Phelps died in April 1789.

Children:
Solomon- Born 1741, graduated Harvard 1762, died 1790
Charles- See Charles Phelps Jr. biographical sketch
Timothy- Born January 25, 1747, died 1817
Joseph- Born November 23, 1749, died December 17, 1749.
Dorothy- Born November 23, 1749, married Jonathan Warner
Abigail- Born 1751, married John Williams, died 1835
Lucy- Born 1753, died 1757
John- Born 1756, died 1761
Experience- Born 1760, died 1847
Lucy- Born 1780, died 1786 of scarlet fever

Charles Phelps Sr.'s papers are contained in BOX 2. They include his own notes on the births and deaths of his family members. There are letters to his son Charles in the 1770s. Of some importance is correspondence concerning his separation from the Hadley church, as well as correspondence with Harvard College about his son Solomon. Financial and legal papers include deeds of the 1740s-1760s and indentures for servants. These are important documents of Hadley's early history. Phelps is also interesting for his involvement in the New York - Vermont boundary dispute.

For more information, see Phelps Family Memoirs, written by John Phelps in 1886.

Charles Phelps Jr. (1743-1814)

Charles Phelps was born in Hadley, Massachusetts in August of 1743. He was actually Charles Phelps Jr., as he shared his father's name.

Although Charles was not formally educated, he was a very successful and prominent man. He became a lawyer and also a wealty farmer when he married Elizabeth Porter on June 14, 1770. He went to live with his wife and mother-in-law and took over management of the family estate at "Forty Acres."

Charles immedately began expanding and improving the house and farm. In 1782, he built a large barn and in 1795, a chaise house. According to family tradition, Phelps was a self taught architect and may have made the plans for many improvements himself. By the time of his death he had altered the house dramatically and reportedly enlarged the farm to nearly a thousand acres. (See The History of the House section and the Historic Structures Report for a more detailed account of these changes.) To help with the farm work, Charles Phelps owned two slaves, a man named Caesar and a young girl named Phyllis. He was in charge of two bond servants, several apprentices, as well as numerous seasonal farm hands.

Charles Phelps did not spend much time on the farm himself. He was very busy with his work as lawyer and politicial. As representative for Hadley in the Massachusetts Legislature, he was often away from home on trips to Boston. He served the following terms 1791-94, 1795-96, 1798-99, 1807-08. Phelps was also Squire of the town of Hadley, deacon of the church, and chairman of the building committee for the new church in 1808. From 1781 until his death, Charles was a Trustee of Hopkins Academy. He was an early member of the Massachusetts Society for Promotting Agriculture and of the Humane Society.

Because of his professional success and the many architectural changes he made to the house, Charles Phelps is perhaps the most important person in the history of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington house. In 1814, after suffering declining health for many months, Charles Phelps died at his home in Hadley.

Children:
Moses Porter- Changed name to Charles Porter, see Charles Porter Phelps biographical sketch
Charles- Born and died 1776
Elizabeth Whiting- See Elizabeth Whiting Phelps Huntington biographical sketch

The papers of Charles Phelps Jr. are a very important part of the collection, as he was a prominent figure in Hadley and all Massachusetts, at the time of the Revolution and the early nation.

Charles Phelps' papers are contained in BOX 4. They include incoming and outgoing correspondence. Of interest are two letters from his brother Solomon in 1775 about the War. There is also an interesting one from his slave Sezor (Caesar) who was fighting at Ticonderoga in 1776. There are a number of letters to his wife and to his son Charles while he was in Boston studying in the 1780s and 90s. These discuss the farm and animals, journeys back and forth to Boston, town government and politics, and the family's general health. The plans for travel between Hadley and Boston are of particular interest. Miscellaneous financial and legal documents are in chronological order. These include a 1777 tax assesment of his estate, deeds of land purchased, indentures of servants, and receipts of slaves. A division of Phelps' estate was drawn up by his son Charles Porter in 1817. See also the oversized materials box.

(Moses) Charles Porter Phelps (1772-1857)

Moses Porter Phelps was born to Charles and Elizabeth on August 8, 1772. He was fitted for college by Reverend Joseph Lyman of Hatifeld. In 1787, he began his studies at Harvard, graduating in 1791. At that time, he changed his name to Charles Porter Phelps. He then went to Newburyport, to live and study law with Theophilus Parsons. There Charles met his teacher's niece, Sarah Davenport Parsons (see Sarah Parsons Phelps biographical sketch) and the two became very close. He was admitted to the Bar in 1795 and opened a law practice in Boston. However, he felt he was unsuccessful as a lawyer, barely earning enough to pay his expenses. In April of 1799, he closed his office and went home to Hadley. There he spent the summer superintending the alterations of his father's home to make it suitable to accomodate two families. Charles planned to marry Sarah Parsons and move to Hadley with her, the following spring.

Finally, after eight years of aquaintance (see his autobiography for a description of the relationship), the two were married in Newburyport on January 1, 1800. However, Charles' career plans had changed and the Phelps' chose to stay in Boston, while he formed a business partnership with Edward Rand. They carried out a merchant business from No. 3 Cadman's Wharf, Boston. Unfortunately, this partnership was cut short by the death of Mr. Rand in a duel, during the summer of 1801. Charles continued the exporting business, with varying success, until 1816, when he was employed very briefly as cashier of the Massachusetts Bank. In 1815, he began his political career as a Boston Representative to the State Legislature.

With the fluctuations in his success as a merchant, Charles and his family had made a number of extended visits to his parent's home in Hadley. In 1815, he had received a large profit and decided to use the money to build a new house on his share of the ancestral acres in Hadley. This later became known as The Phelps Farm. The barn was ready for his Merino sheep later that year and by 1817 the house was ready for family occupancy. Sadly, Sarah Phelps never came to reside in the new home. She died of typhous fever in the midst of the family's move to Hadley. Her cousin Charlotte came there to help with the five children and in time she became Charles' second wife. They were married in 1820 and had four more children. The Phelps children had a tendency to be sickly and many died young. Charlotte Parsons Phelps died in 1830 and Charles married a third time to Elizabeth Judkins in 1833.

Charles Porter Phelps termed his sheep raising a failure, but continued to run his farm. He attained increasing success in Hadley as a lawyer and selectman. Between 1820 and 1841, he served ten terms as Hadley representative in the Legislature and in 1826-27, was Senator of the Hampshire district.

Like his sister, Elizabeth Phelps Huntington, Charles converted from Congregational to Unitarian in the early 19th century. For a very detailed account of his life and business in Boston, see the autobiographical sketch in BOX 10.

Children:
Charles- Born September 18, 1801
Edward- Born August 17, 1803, died February 17, 1807
Sarah- Born March 16, 1805
Francis
Elizabeth- Born December 4, 1808, died December 5, 1809
Marianne- Born September 13, 1810
Louisa- Born June 27, 1812, died December 31, 1813
Caroline- See her biographical sketch under Caroline Phelps Bullfinch
Arthur- Born March 16, 1817
Theophilus Parsons- Born after 1820, involved in Oliver Smith will dispute as a witness of the will William Charlotte
Susan Davis- See her biographical sketch

Charles Porter Phelps' papers are contained in BOX 10. His 1857 autobiography is an extremely detailed document. This tells of his life, including his career, courtship of his first wife, the family's health and growth. Charles also writes about politics and government, with several pages on the War of 1812. There are a few folders of outgoing correspondence to his parents, his sister, and Sarah Parsons before their marriage. The bulk of his papers are financial. These include bills for his studies at Harvard, account books of 1786 and 1817, and shipping bills and insurance between 1800-1812. A few legal papers are deeds for land in Hadley, 1817-1823. See also the oversized materials box for his 1814 commission as major, by Governor Caleb Strong.

The box of Charles Porter Phelps Family papers, BOX 11 contains correspondence to Charles from his children.

In the box of his sister, Elizabeth Phelps Huntington, BOX 13, is a folder of material about her posthumous exoneration by the Hadley Congregational church. This also includes information on Charles Porter Phelps' conversion to Unitarianism in the 1820s.

Elizabeth Porter Phelps (1747-1817)

Elizabeth was born in 1747, the only child of Moses and Elizabeth Porter. At the age of five, her family moved from the stockaded center of Hadley to the new house built by her father in 1752. Only three years later, her father was killed fighting in the French and Indian War. Elizabeth (also called Betty, Bette, or Betsy) continued to live on the "Forty Acres" farm outside of town, with her widowed mother, but under the watchful eye of her father's family in Hadley.

In 1768, a man named Charles Phelps came to the farm to help out for a few days. Elizabeth mentions this casually in her diary, but there is no further mention of him until the preparations for their marriage began. The two were married on June 14, 1770. Charles moved into the house with Elizabeth and her mother and took charge of the farm.

Elizabeth was very active socially and seems to have entertained guests at her house almost continuously. She acted as a midwife and ministered to the sick in the community. Along with several servant girls and one slave girl named Phyllis, Elizabeth Phelps carried out the household production of large quantities of soap, butter, and especially cheese. On this large farm, the women were sometimes feeding more that 20 farm hands in addition to the regular household members.

Elizabeth raised two children, as well as a girl named Thankful Hitchcock who she treated like daughter. After her children had grow and moved away, the Phelps' grandchildren came frequently to spend extended periods of time on the farm at "Forty Acres." Elizabeth Porter Phelps had spent her entire life there when she died in 1817.

Elizabeth Porter Phelps' papers, in BOXES 5-7, are an extremely valuable resource for studies of women's history, household affairs, and mother-daughter relationships. Her diary kept between 1766 and 1812, is a remarkable document, as she wrote in it faithfully every week. The first few years are mainly about religious concerns, but later she tells of life in the house, visits of friends, births and deaths of townspeople, and family events. Typed copies of the diary in BOXES 8-9 are available for researchers. This diary is supplemented by correspondence to her daughter Elizabeth Huntington (bulk 1794-1815) to give a full picture of this woman's life and family. The letters tell about household work, servants, visits with Charles Porter Phelps and his family, trips to Boston, and hopes for Huntington family visits to Hadley. In Elizabeth Huntington's papers (BOXES 12-13) are numerous letters in reply to her mother. There was a strong mother-daughter bond between the two women and their correspondence is a valuable source for information on these relationships in the early 19th century. Typed copies of the letters are in BOX 6. There is also outgoing correspondnece to Elizabeth Phelps' son, her husband, and friend Penelope Williams of Roxbury, Massachusetts.

Sarah Davenport Parsons Phelps (?-1817)

Sarah was the daughter of Moses Parsons of Haverhill. She was apparantly orphaned, because she spent her teenage years with her grandmother in Boston. Sarah met Charles Porter Phelps in 1792 when he came to board and study with her uncle Theophilus Parsons in Newburyport. Two years later, her grandmother died and Sarah came to live with the Newburyport family.

Sarah and Charles Porter Phelps were married on January 1, 1800. Sarah stayed on with her uncle in Newburyport for three months after her marriage, while her husband was on the family farm at "Forry Acres" in Hadley. She joined him there for the summer and in the fall the couple moved to the south end of Boston. In December 1800, they moved again, to a house on Summer Street owned by Eben Parsons.

Sarah Phelps lived with her husband in Boston, giving birth to seven children before she died of typhoid fever in 1817.

Children: See list under Charles Porter Phelps

Sarah Phelps' papers are found in the Charles Porter Phelps' Family papers, BOX 11. There are notes written by her after her marriage in 1800. The bulk of her papers are letters written to her mother-in-law, Elizabeth Porter Phelps between 1801 and 1811.

Susan Davis Phelps (1827-1865)

Susan was the youngest child of Charles Porter Phelps and his second wife Charlotte. She grew up in Hadley, apparently attending school in Amherst, where she is said to have been a classmate and close friend of Emily Dickinson. In 1854, Susan was engaged to Henry V. Emmons. However, in 1860, she broke the engagement unexplainedly. Five years later, Susan died, supposedly of a broken heart. References to Susan's relationship with the Dickinsons can be found in The Year's and Hours of Emily Dickinson by Jay Leyda.

There are only a few letters of Susan Phelps in BOX 11. However, she is important to researchers, because of her close friendship with Emily and Susan Dickinson. Two letters from Susan Phelps to her niece, Ellen Bullfinch, mention the Dickinson family. Notes on Susan from Jay Leyda's book are also included in this box.

Dean Pierce (1857-1925)

Dean Pierce was the father of Sarah Higginson Pierce who married James Lincoln Huntington in 1911 (see her biographical sketch under Sarah Pierce Huntington). The Pierce's forebearers were a wealthy Newburyport family. He was the son of Jacob Willard and Mary Boardman Pierce. Dean was born in Newburyport on July 16, 1857. He married Louisa Bowditch (see her biographical sketch below) on October 31, 1882. They lived in Brookline.

Children:
Dorothy Wendell
Sarah Higginson- See Sarah Pierce Huntington
Rosamond- Married Thomas Barbour (see his biographical sketch)
Mary Dean
In the Pierce Family box, BOX 121, are two letters received by Dean Pierce, bills, and receipts of the 1870s, and theater programs, menus, advertisements, and business cards saved by him in the 1870s.

Jacob Willard Pierce

The papers of Jacob W. Pierce, found in the Pierce Family BOX 121, include a folder of incoming correspondence 1813-1821. There is also a passport granted to him in 1874. See also the boxes of legal and oversize material for an account of his estate and documents relating to the family shipping business. See the photographsBOX 140.

Louisa Higginson Bowditch Pierce (1860-1929)

Louisa Bowditch was born in Brookline, Massachusetts, on April 25, 1860. She was the grandaughter of famous navigator Nathaniel Bowditch and youngest daughter of William. Louisa attended private schools and became an accompolished pianist and self taught botanist. On October 31, 1882, she married Dean Pierce. On April 4, 1929, Louisa died in Brookline, having lived there all her life.

Children: See list under Dean Pierce above

Papers of Louisa Bowditch Pierce are found in the Pierce Family box, BOX 121. These include a journal of her trip to Europe in 1874 and about 20 pieces of outgoing correspondence . There are letters received from childhood friends in the 1870s, as well as others received in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

See the letters written to her in the 1860s by her father, William Bowditch. These are in the form of wonderful little fairy stories. They are located in the Bowditch Family box, BOX 114.

Elizabeth Pitkin Porter (1719-1798)

Elizabeth Pitkin was born in 1719. She was the daughter of Nathaniel Pitkin of Hartford. In 1743, Elizabeth married Moses Porter and moved up the Connecticut River to join him in Hadley.

The couple apparantly lived within the town stockade, where Moses is said to have built a small house for them near his parent's home. In 1747, at the age of 28, Elizabeth Porter gave birth to a baby girl, also named Elizabeth.

According to family stories, Elizabeth grew unhappy with the crowded conditions of life in the Hadley stockade and convinced her husband to build a new house for the family on his northern lands. Here, however, the family stories seem to conflict. When the house was finished in 1752, Elizabeth, being a city girl at heart, was reportedly unhappy to move two miles north of town into the first house built outside the stockade.

She became more disturbed in 1755, when her husband went to fight in the French and Indian War as Captain of a town regiment. Letters to Moses at this time, tell of her fears that he would not return. Then on September 8, 1755, those fears came true. Again, family history relates this tragedy. Captain Porter's sword was brought back to Hadley by his Indian body servant. Elizabeth, hearing a knock at one of the north windows, pushed back the heavy shutter and the sword was handed in to her. She immediately understood the significance of this gesture.

Elizabeth was thus left alone with her eight year old daughter on this large farm so far from town. The two seem to have lived with family in Hadley for the winter and there was some talk as to whether or not they would move back to the big farm in the spring. Elizabeth chose to do so and she hired a kinsman named Worthington to manage the farm. He lived with the two Porter women until 1770, when the younger Elizabeth married. Her husband, Charles Phelps moved in and took charge of the farm.

It is perhaps surprising that Widow Porter never remarried, as she was only 36 years old when Moses died and was certainly a wealthy woman. It is said that she never recovered from the loss of her husband. She was apparantly depressed and sickly for the rest of her life and stories say she took up the "habit" of the day, opium and alcohol. However, these tales may be unfounded, as Elizabeth was 89 years old when she died in 1798.

There are only a few papers pertaining to Elizabeth Porter. These are contained in BOX 3 with those of her husband Moses. They consist of correspondence between the two in 1755, when Moses was away fighting in the French and Indian War, right before his death. Her wedding dress is a part of clothing collection of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House Museum.

Moses Porter (1722-1755)

Moses Porter was born in Hadley, January 13, 1722. He was the second son of Samuel Porter and Anna Colton and great grandson of Samuel Porter, an original settler of the town of Hadley. In 1743, Moses married Elizabeth Pitkin, the daughter of Nathaniel Pitkin, a wealthy Hartford man. The couple lived in or near Moses' parents home within the Hadley stockade.

Although, not formally educated, Moses was a wealthy man. In 1748, he was executor of his father's large estate and inherited a great deal of land from it. In fact, by 1752, Moses and his family had acquired ownership of practically all the tract of land known as "Forty Acres and its skirts." This was fertile farm land, located about a mile north of town, which had originally been divided as common land when the town was laid out in 1659.

By 1752, conditions within the town stockade had become crowded. Moses Porter decided it was time to move north to "Forty Acres" and build a new home for his family. On May 27, 1752, the roof was raised. By December, the house was apparantly ready for occupancy and Moses moved his wife and daughter in.

The new farm was a large and successful one. According to his estate inventory, Moses Porter owned 61 acres of farm and 50 acres of skirt, along with 535 acres of land elsewhere in town. He also had a one seventh share of the saw mill in North Hadley. Moses owned three horses and a colt, two steer, a bull, a yoke of oxen, four heifers, four cows and calves, as well as numerous smaller animals. He was one of few men in town to own a riding chair and a sleigh, in addition to the usual farm equipment. To carry out all the work on such a large farm, owned two of the 18 slaves living in the town of Hadley at this time, and probably had additional farm hands and indentured servants.

Moses Porter was also a military man. In 1755, he went off to fight in the French and Indian War, as Captain of a regiment commanded by Colonel Ephriam Williams. On September 8th of that year, he was killed in the "Battle of Bloody Morning Scout" near Lake George, New York. Moses Porter was only 33 years old and left behind a young widow and an eight year old daughter, Elizabeth.

Moses Porter's papers are contained in BOX 3, along with those of his wife Elizabeth. These help to document the early years of the house and farm. They consist of several letters to Elizabeth in 1755, while he was fighting in the War. Also included are a number of deeds for land Moses purchased in the 1740s and 50s. Excerpts from the diary of Sarah Porter give dates of the construction of the house. The original is on microfilm at the Jones Library. Also of great importance is the 1756 inventory of Moses Porter's estate, which can be found in the oversized materials box.

Edmund Quincy (1903- )

Edmund was born May 15, 1903 in Biarritz. He was the only son of Josiah Huntington Quincy and Ellen Krebs. His mother died the year after his birth. His father married again in 1905, to Mary Honey, who later adopted Edmund as her son. Edmund graduated from Harvard in 1925. He is a portrait and landscape painter, having also published some poetry. He has lived in Italy much of his life. On March 19, 1940, Edmund married Josephine Biamonti in Bordighera, Italy. She was the daughter of Alessandro and Palmira Fontana Biamonti. The Quincy's have one adopted son, Daniel.

Edmund Quincy was a good friend of Catharine Huntington and his papers, in BOX 123, contain five folders of letters to her in the 1930s. There are also two folders of clippings, programs and photographs of his paintings. He wrote a short piece called "On a Visit to Hadley", which was published in 1959 in his Legends and Conditions. In 1988, Mr. Quincy donated a large number of papers to the Porter- Phelps-Huntington Foundation. These include letters received by him, in the 1960s and 70s. They are from a wide range of friends and a few from his son, Daniel. These letters are in BOX 124, but they have not been processed.

Helen Frances Huntington Quincy (1831-1903)

"Fanny" Huntington was born in Northampton on July 7, 1831. She was the first child of Charles Phelps and Helen Sophia Mills Huntington. Fanny grew up in Northampton, moving to Boston with the family in the late 1840s. There she married Josiah P. Quincy on December 23, 1858. She died December 11, 1903.

Children:
Josiah Huntington- See biographical sketch below
Helen- Born 1861, married 1894 to James Muirhead
Mabel- Born 1863, married 1889 to Walter Davis
Violet- Born 1868, died 1871
Fanny Huntington- Born 1879, married 1899 Mark Anthony DeWolfe Howe, died 1933

BOX 122, the Quincy Family box contains three outgoing letters from Fanny and seven letters received. In the 1880s, Fanny's uncle, Theodore G. Huntington, wrote sketches of his life in Hadley in the form of letters to her. Copies of these are contained in BOX 21. These were later published and also form a large portion of Arria Huntington's book, Under a Colonial Roof Tree.

Josiah Huntington Quincy (1859-1919)

Josiah, the first child of Helen Frances Huntington and Josiah Quincy, was born on October 15, 1859. He graduated from Harvard in 1880, attended Harvard Law School and was admitted to the Bar in 1884. From 1896-98, Josiah was Mayor of Boston. In 1900, he married Elen Krebs in London, England. She died four years later in Biarritz. Josiah married a second time in New York to Mary Honey. He died on September 19, 1919.

Children:
Edmund- See biographical sketch above.

This collection contains the wedding invitation of Josiah Quincy and Mary Honey in BOX 122.

Josiah P. Quincy (1829-1910)

Josiah was the son of the Honorable Josiah Quincy of Boston. He was born November 28, 1829. On December 23, 1858, he married Helen Frances Huntington. They lived in Boston. He died October 31, 1910.

Children: See list under Helen Frances Huntington Quincy above

Amelia Barnard Sargent (1809-1890)

Amelia, the first child of Epes and Hannah Sargent, was born in Gloucester in 1809. She married in 1855, to a man named Hoffman. She died in 1890 with no children.

There are a few papers of Amelia in the Sargent Family BOX 125. These include three outgoing letters and an 1824 copy book.

Epes Sargent V (1784-1853)

Epes Sargent, born March 7, 1784, was the fifth Epes of the Sargent family who had been in Gloucester since the 1670s. His grandfather and great grandfather had been ship owners, but the former remained loyal to the King during the Revolution and lost the family fortune. Epes V was the son of John Osborne and Lydia Foster Sargent. At the age of five, Epes was orphaned. He and his sister grew up in the home of his grandfather Foster.

In 1799, when Epes was only 14, he sailed to Canton as a cabin boy on the ship "Eliza." He made several more sea voyages out of Gloucester and then in 1818, Epes went into partnership with his brother in law, John Barker who was a flour merchant. At this time, the family pulled up their long Gloucester roots and moved to Boston. The partnership continued until the 1820s, when business losses compelled Sargent to take to the sea again. He aquired interest in the Brig "Romulus" and made three trips to St. Petersburg, Russia. A fourth trip to Russia was made on the "Volga."

In 1836, the Sargent family, choosing to try life in the country, sold the Boston house and bought a farm in Milton, Massachusetts. This experiment did not last long, however, and in 1839, they moved back to Boston to a house on Western Avenue. Apparantly a rather restless family, they later moved to a house at Hartford Place and finally to Roxbury. There Epes Sargent died on April 19, 1853.

During his life, Epes was married three times and had 12 children. One of his daughters, Hannah Dane, was married to Frederic Dan Huntington in 1843, connecting the Sargent and Huntington families.

Wives:
Mary Pearson- Born 1786, married Epes Sargent 1806, died 1807.
Hannah Dane Coffin- Born 1787, married Epes Sargent 1808 in Gloucester, died 1819 in Boston.
Mary Otis Lincoln- See her biographical sketch below

Children:
1st Marriage
Amelia- Born 1806, died 1807

2nd Marriage
Amelia Barnard- See biographical sketch above
John Osborne- see biographical sketch below
Epes- see biographical sketch below.
Mary Frances- Born 1815, died 1896 in Roxbury, unmarried
William Coffin- Born 1817, died 1818
George Barnard- See biographical sketch below.
3rd Marriage Hannah Dane- See biographical sketch under Hannah Dane Sargent Huntington.
James Otis- See biographical sketch below
Catherine Osborne- See biographical sketch under Catherine Sargent Sumner
Arria- Born 1827, died 1846
Elizabeth Lincoln- Born 1830, died 1847.

There are only two folders of Epes Sargent V papers in the Sargent Family BOX 125. These include letters written to his grandson in the 1840s and 50s, telling the story of his life. They describe his sea travels in great detail, providing a good deal of information. His portrait is in the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House.

Epes Sargent VI (1813-1880)

The sixth Epes Sargent was born in Gloucester, September 27, 1813. He was the second son of Epes and Hannah Sargent. In 1818, his family moved to Boston where he grew up, attending Roxbury High School. At the age of 15, Epes went on a voyage to Russia with his father. He did not take to the sea life, however, and went on to become a successful writer and editor.

Epes Sargent attended Harvard for a few years, but did not graduate. This did not seem to hurt his career and he soon became an editorial writer for The Boston Daily Advertiser and The Atlas. He later moved to New York City, where he was in charge of the New York Mirror. In 1848, Epes returned to Boston and married Elizabeth Weld (1819-1901). By 1853, he had become Editor of the Boston Evening Transcript.

In addition to editing, Epes Sargent wrote a number of plays and edited poems. He is perhaps most famous for compiling The Standard Speaker and The Standard Reader, which were in common use in Boston schools for many years.

Epes Sargent VI died in Roxbury on December 30, 1880. He had no children by his marriage, but had three illegitimate daughters by a Miss Herron. These were said to be the result of a "spiritualistic association" and were recognized by Epes and his family as his children, but they were never legally adopted.

There are only a few papers of Epes Sargent in the Sargent Family box, BOX 125. These include five letters to his nephew George Huntington in the 1860s and 70s. There is also a pamplet written by him in 1876, entitled "Does it Matter at All." See the photographs series for photos of his portraits. An original portrait hangs in the Porter-Phelps- Huntington House.

George Barnard Sargent (1818-1896)

George Sargent, was born to Epes and Hannah Sargent, in 1818. He grew up in Boston, but later chose an adventurous western life. In 1838, he moved to Iowa and married Mary Perin, the following year. He and his family were living in Davenport, Iowa in 1847, when he opened the bankhouse of "Cook and Sargent." George was successful there and in 1851, was elected Mayor of Davenport. However, he felt the pull to the west and in 1869, the family moved on the Duluth, Minnesota. George died there in 1875, but many of his ten children and their families continued to live in Duluth well into the 20th century.

Children:
Epes
Amelia Frances
John James
George Lenox
George Barnard
Mary Otis
Elizabeth Lincoln,
Emilie Macklot- see biographical sketch under Emilie Sargent Paine
Mary Epes
William Coffin

Papers of George Sargent include only two letters to George Huntington in 1868-69. These are in BOX 125.

Georgiana Welles Sargent (1858-1946)

Georgiana Sargent was born May 10, 1858, the only child of John and Georgiana Welles Sargent. In 1923, she was living in Lenox, unmarried, devoted to gardening. "Cousin Georgie" was close to the family of her cousin George Huntington and apparantly helped to put one or more of his sons through college.

Papers of Georgiana Sargent are found in the BOX 125 of the Sargent Family. These include about 20 outgoing letters to members of the Huntington family in the late 19th and early 20th century. See also the separate unit of Michael Paul Huntington papers, BOX 90, for a few letters from Georgie in the 1930s and 40s.

James Otis Sargent (1823-1897)

James, ninth child of Epes Sargent V, was born in 1823 in Boston. He died in 1897, unmarried with no descendants.

In the Sargent Family box, BOX 125, are two folders of outgoing correspondence. There are about 25 letters to his nephew George Huntington in the 1860s-90s. See the photographsBOX 135.

John Osborne Sargent VI (1811-1891)

The eldest son of Epes and Hannah Sargent, John Osborne was born in Gloucester in 1811. He was a lawyer and well known journalist, and also did translations of Latin and German literature. At Harvard, John was friends with James Freeman Clarke and Oliver Wendell Holmes while they edited the Collegian and College Monthly together.

Below is a list of the importants events of his life:

1821-1826Roxbury Latin School
1830Graduated from Harvard
1833Admitted to the Bar
1836-1837Massachusetts Legislature
1838Moved to New York City and became associate editor of the Courier and Enquirer
1841Resumed law practice, interested in Whig politics
1854Married Georgiana, daughter of Benjamin Welles
1861His wife being ill, the family moved to Europe, where they lived for 12 years.
ca. 1873Returned to United States, bought summer house in Lenox, Massachusetts, spent winters in New York
1892Died

Children:
Georgiana Welles Sargent- See biographical sketch above

John O. Sargent's papers in BOX 125 of the Sargent Family, include a journal kept in 1863, while he was in Europe. He was involved in publishing the Treasury of the Psalter with George Huntington and there are several letters to George in the collection. His 1892 obituary provides some biographical information. The dispute over his will in 1946- 47 is also included and gives geneological data. See the photographsBOX 135.

Mary Otis Lincoln Sargent (1795-1870)

Mary Otis, daughter of Abner and Hannah Lincoln, was born in 1795, in Hingham, Massachusetts. She grew up there and was a school mistress. The children of Epes Sargent, by his previous marriage, attended her school and there the two met. Mary became Epes' third wife in 1821. She lived with him and his children in Boston and Roxbury, increasing the family with five more children. Mary Sargent died on December 3, 1870 in Roxbury. Mary was the grandaughter of Major General Benjamin Lincoln, who had been one of George Washington's Generals. For more information, see his biographical sketch.

Children: See list under Epes Sargent V

Mary O.L. Sargent's papers, in the Sargent Family box, BOX 125, include several letters from her to George and Lilly Huntington in the 1860s and 70s. There is also a small piece of needlework done by her, and most importantly, her will of 1879. See the photographsBOX 135.

Archibald Lowery Sessions (1860-1948)

Archie Sessions, the son of Elizabeth Fisher and John Sessions, was a great grandson of Dan Huntington. He was born January 12, 1860. Archie graduated from Harvard University and went on to become an Editor with Ainslee's and Street and Smith in New York City.

On November 6, 1887, he married Ruth Huntington who was his second cousin, the grandaughter of Dan Huntington. They lived in New York, spending summers on the Phelps Farm in Hadley, which Ruth had been given by her father Frederic Dan in 1893. Late in life, Ruth and Archie were apparently on the farm every summer, spending the winter months nearby in Northampton. Ruth died first and Archie followed two years later on September 19, 1948.

Children:
Hannah Sargent- see biographical sketch below
Mary- Born 1890, died 1892
Roger- Born 1896, married 1920 Barbara Foster, married 2nd Elizabeth Franck. Was a major 20th century composer. There are a few letters from Roger in the Sessions Family box (BOX 127)
John Archibald- see biographical sketch below

There are only a few outgoing letters from Archie Session in the Sessions family box, BOX 127. These include some to his wife, Ruth. See the photographsBOX 136.

Elizabeth Phelps Fisher Sessions (1825-1897)

Elizabeth Fisher was born in Oswego, New York March 29, 1825. She was the first child of George and Elizabeth Huntington Fisher. She grew up in Oswego and in 1851, married John Sessions (1820-1899). They lived in New York City where he was a lawyer. Elizabeth died July 24, 1897.

Children:
Elizabeth- Born 1853, died 1860
Clara Fisher- Born 1854, married Edwin Wheeler, children Elizabeth and Richard
Adeline
Grace Martin
Archibald Lowery- See biographical sketch above
John- Born 1866, died 1867

Hannah Sargent Sessions (Andrews) (1889-?)

Hannah was the eldest child of Ruth and Archie Sessions and the favorite grandchild of Frederic Dan Huntington. She was born on February 16, 1889 and grew up in New York City, spending summers in Hadley. There she was very close to her cousin Catharine and the other children of George Huntington.

Hannah attended Radcliffe College. Then on December 15, 1917, she married Paul Shipman Andrews. He was a lawyer, born August 2, 1887. Hannah and Paul lived in Syracuse.

Children:
Nigel Lyon
William Shankland

Hannah Sessions Andrews' few papers are contained in the Sessions Family box, BOX 127. They include letters to her Huntington cousins. See the photographsBOX 136. See also the separate unit of Michael Paul Huntington papers BOX 90, for letters from Hannah in the 1930s and 40s.

John Archibald Sessions (1899-1948?)

John Sessions, son of Ruth and Archibald, was born May 21, 1899. He grew up in New York City, spending summers on the Phelps Farm in Hadley. John graduated from Harvard in 1921. On July 2, 1927, he married 22 year old Florence Mary Doheny Hackett who had just graduated from Smith College.

The couple lived on the Phelps Farm, which John had modernized and improved for winter living. There, he carried on the family dairy business until his death in 1948.

Doheny Sessions outlived her husband by many years and continued to run the farm. In 1952, she received a Master's Degree in education. Doheny was Associate Curator of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House in the 1960s and after Dr. Huntington's death in 1968, was Curator until 1977. Doheny resided on the Phelps Farm until 1988.

Children:
Jane Anne Byrne (Scott)
Sarah Fisher (Chapin)

In BOX 127 of the Sessions family are a few letters from John and Doheny Sessions to their Huntington cousins in the 1930s and 40s. See the photographsBOX 136.

Ruth Gregson Huntington Sessions (1859-1946)

Ruth Huntington was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts on November 3, 1859. She moved with her parents, Hannah and Frederic Dan, to Syracuse, New York, when her father became Bishop there.

Ruth was well educated and well travelled. In 1880, the family sent her to Europe, where she spent three years and studied piano under Clara Schumann in Germany. Her older sister Arria and friend Miss Hamilton accompanied her on the first leg of her journey. At the end of her stay, Ruth's brother George came to Europe to bring her home.

In 1887, Ruth married Archibald Lowery Sessions and moved with him to New York City. There Ruth was one of the founders of the Consumer's League. She also worked on factory condition reforms and was instrumental in getting child labor laws passed. Later in life, Ruth founded the Children's Home Association in Northampton, Massachusetts.

In addition to this social work, Ruth Sessions, published a number of poems and short stories, including some articles written under a male pen-name. During the 1890s, she was literary editor of the Girl's Friendly Magazine. Ruth also gave occasional literary speaches and was involved with the Hampshire Bookshop in Northampton in the 1930s. Her most important work was Sixty Odd, published in 1936, about her childhood in Boston, Syracuse, and especially in Hadley.

Hadley was a very dear place to Ruth Sessions. In 1893, her father, Frederic Dan Huntington, purchased the Phelps Farm from his cousins and gave it to her. Ruth and Archie used it as their summer home. Ruth spent the winter months in Northampton, where she was house mother to Smith College students in what is now known as Sessions House. Ruth died in Northampton on December 2, 1946.

Children:
Hannah Sargent- See biographical sketch above
Mary- Born 1890, died 1892
Roger John Archibald- See biographical sketch above

Ruth H. Sessions' papers are found in BOX 126. They consist of some outgoing correspondence, including three folders to her brother George. There are a few pieces of incoming correspondence. Some 1890s magazines, contain her published work. See also the legal size materials, BOX 175. See also, Sixty Odd, written by Ruth about her childhood. See photographsBOX 136.

Marianne Theresa Gellineau St. Agnan Stearns (1805-1889)

Marianne (or Mary Anne) Theresa St. Agnan was born March 25, 1805 in Port of Spain, Trinidad. Tragically, she was immediately an orphan. A few months before her birth, Marianne's father, Michael St. Agnan, was drowned while bringing a shipload of slaves from Grenada. Only days after her birth, mother Theodora Gellineau St. Agnan died from the effects of childbirth and the loss of her husband. Marianne was left in the care of her grandmother Lucette Poinsette Gellineau and her aunt, also named Lucette.

Marianne was promised in marriage to her cousin Thomas Tyler. In 1810, he was sent to America to Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire and Marianne went to Newburyport, Massachusetts to attend Miss Mary Anne Coleman's school. The family plans fell through however, when Miss Coleman moved her school to Salem and Marianne St. Agnan met Richard Stearns (1803-1840). The two eloped to Providence, Rhode Island and were married in November of 1821.

This marriage upset both families and may have been a stormy one. The couple lived on Essex Street in Salem, where they had three children. However, family stories tell that they were unhappy and the marriage unsuccessful. Richard disliked his wife so strongly that he is said to have kept Marianne locked in the attic of his mother's house for many years. The truth of this tale can be questioned. However, it is known that the three children were cared for by Richard's mother, Sarah White Sprague Stearns. Richard Stearns was killed suddenly in 1840, when he was thrown from his carriage by a runaway horse.

Another family tale tells that Marianne was the intimate friend of Nathaniel Hawthorne and Margaret Fuller. Marianne is said to have kept a school in Miss Shaw's house on Beacon Hill in Boston, where the Colonel Robert Louis Shaw was a pupil. In 1850, Marianne Stearns moved to Malden where she lived with her daughter and son-in-law, Lucy and Henry Barrett, until her death on November 17, 1889.

Children:
William St. Agnan- See photographsBOX 138.
Lucy Theodora Gellineau- See Lucy Stearns Barrett biographical sketch
Sarah White Sprague- Married Hamiliton Phillips

Marianne St. Agnan Stearns' papers are in BOX 129. They contain much outgoing correspondence from the 1840s through the 1870s. There are 25 letters to her grand- daughter, Lilly Barrett.

Incoming correspondence from relatives in Trinidad 1805-1819 is interesting for its documentation of her childhood, schooling, and life in Trinidad. A notebook kept by her in 1845, contains lovely prose and poetry. See the photographsBOX 138.

BOX 128, of the Stearns, St. Agnan, and Gellineau families contains four folders of letters to Marianne from Gellineau relatives 1815-19. Her grandfather, Charles Anthony Gellineau's will of 1821 shows the family's financial condition and relationships. Also included is correspondence of Marianne's daughter, Sarah White Sprague Stearns Phillips.

Catherine Osbourne Sargent Sumner (1825-1909)

Catherine Sargent, daughter of Epes V and Mary, was born in Boston in 1825. She grew up in Boston and Roxbury. In 1862, she married Austin Sumner. He died in 1879 and she remained a widow throughout her life. She lived in the Sargent house in Cedar Square, Roxbury, with her brother James. The children of her nephew, George Huntington, lived with "Aunt Kate" at various times while at school in Boston. She died in 1909 in Roxbury.

Children:
John Osbourne- Born 1863, died 1938

In BOX 130 of the Sumner family, is a small diary of Catherine Sargent in 1852 and a note book of the 1840s. There are about thirty letters from her to nephew, George Huntington and his children from the 1880s, until 1909. There are also letters from John Osbourne Sumner to the Huntingtons and a valuation of his estate. Mary and Marguerita or Rita Sumner are represented with several outgoing letters, but their relationships to the family are unknown. See the photographsBOX 135.

Photographs

The photographs and cased images unit (BOXES 131-151) is listed and shelved after the extended family units. There are photographs of all major family members from the mid-19th century on. These were not included in the units of individual people, because they are often group shots. Therefore, within this section, photographs are organized by family or generation. Consult the container listing to identify the location of pictures of a given person. Group photographs are placed in folders labeled with the father's name. There are a number of group pictures of Frederic Dan Huntington's family from the late 19th century, including many shots taken in front of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House.

Oversized photographs are identified in individual folders and placed in separate boxes, arranged alphabetically. There are also four boxes of unidentified cased images and photographs. (If any identifications are made, please notify the Archivist.)

Miscellaneous and Unidentified

Miscellaneous and unidentified material fills BOXES 152-160. This includes papers with no name and unidentifiable handwriting. The container listing includes the type of material and date, if known. There is also a box of material related to a specific person whose association with the Porter, Phelps, and Huntington families is unknown. These papers are arranged in alphabetical order.

Printed Material

A unit of printed material, in BOXES 161-166, contains books published by family members about the house and family. These include copies of Forty Acres by James L. Huntington, Under a Colonial Rooftree by Arria Huntington, and Sixty Odd by Ruth Huntington Sessions. There is also a copy of the Huntington Family Genealogy.

This printed material also includes some magazines and pamphlets saved by unidentified family members. There is a complete set of Gody's Lady's Book magazines of 1848-1852, as well as Peterson's Magazine of 1846. This unit also includes some catalogs and price lists for agricultural and industrial tools from the 1880s through about 1910.

Oversize Material

A separate unit for oversize and legal size materials was created (BOXES 167-178). A note is made in the description of an individual's papers, directing the researcher to look in these oversize boxes. Within these boxes, material is arranged alphabetically by the name of the individual to which it relates.


Additional Information
Contact Information
Amherst College Archives and Special Collections
Robert Frost Library
PO Box 5000
Amherst, MA 01002-5000

Phone: (413) 542-2299
Fax: (413) 542-2692

Email Reference Form: http://www.amherst.edu/library/archives/askus
URL: http://www.amherst.edu/library/archives
Language
English.
Sponsor
Encoding funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.
Contents List
Series 1: EARLY FAMILIES' HISTORY, AND PORTER AND PHELPS FAMILIES



BOX 1 - Early Porter, Phelps, and Huntington papers



Porter Family



Aaron Cooke clippings
1700s

Box 1: folder 1
Eleazor Porter deed
1729

Box 1: folder 2
Deed signed by Eleazor Porter
1784

Box 1: folder 3
Eleazor Porter bill
1784

Box 1: folder 4a
Town Treasurer's report, Eleazor Porter
1788

Box 1: folder 4b
Col. Moses Porter letter received
1833

Box 1: folder 5
Warrants to call town meetings, signed by Samuel Porter
1740s

Box 1: folder 6
Samuel Porter appointment as sheriff
1702

Box 1: folder 7
Samuel Porter slave bill of sale
1698

Box 1: folder 8
Samuel Porter deeds
1719-20

Box 1: folder 9
Samuel Porter deeds
1725-39

Box 1: folder 10
Samuel Porter estate division
1769-73

Box 1: folder 11
Huntington Family



Benjamin Huntington docket books
1770s

Box 1: folder 12
Bethiah Huntington funeral sermon
1799

Box 1: folder 13
Isaac Huntington report of Benedict Arnold drunk in Norwich
1760

Box 1: folder 14
Isaac Huntington receipt
1715

Box 1: folder 15
Samuel Huntington correspondence -- outgoing
1780s

Box 1: folder 15a
Benjamin Franklin letter to Samuel Huntington (copy)
1780

Box 1: folder 16
Samuel Huntington to Benjamin Franklin
1781

Box 1: folder 17
Samuel Huntington information
1789

Box 1: folder 18
Samuel Huntington clipping
1780s

Box 1: folder 19
William Huntington information
1700s

Box 1: folder 20
Clippings about old Huntington letters
1915

Box 1: folder 21
BOX 2 - Charles Phelps Sr. (1717-?)



Charles Phelps Sr. notes on his family
1780s

Box 2: folder 1
Correspondence - outgoing



To Charles Phelps Jr.
1774-79

Box 2: folder 2
To Harvard
1760s

Box 2: folder 3
Dorothy Phelps to Charles Phelps Jr.
1776

Box 2: folder 4
Warrant to call town meeting
1757

Box 2: folder 5
To Wareham Smith about accounts in Albany
1774

Box 2: folder 6
To Council of State of Massachusetts Bay, petition about N.H. land
1779

Box 2: folder 7
Correspondence - incoming



Letter from (son) Solomon Phelps


Box 2: folder 8
Letter received about church absence
1760

Box 2: folder 9
Letter about separation from church
1760

Box 2: folder 10
Financial



Receipt
1759

Box 2: folder 11
Receipts
1760s

Box 2: folder 12
Bills and notes
1760s

Box 2: folder 13
Legal



Deeds
1730s

Box 2: folder 14
Deeds
1740s

Box 2: folder 15
Deeds
1750s

Box 2: folder 16
Deeds
1760s

Box 2: folder 17
Indentures
1760s

Box 2: folder 18
Land agreement, Vermont
1769

Box 2: folder 19
Copies of documents about New York-Vermont land dispute
1770s

Box 2: folder 20
Vermont History v. 57 no.3 re: Charles Phelps, Sr.
1989

Box 2: folder 21
"'Vermonters Unmasked': Charles Phelps and the Patterns of Dissent in Revolutionary Vermont." J. Kevin Graffagnio


Box 2
BOX 3 - Moses (1722-1755) and Elizabeth Porter (1718-1798)



Moses Porter



To Elizabeth Porter
1755

Box 3: folder 1a
Excerpts from Sarah Porter's diary about Moses Porter building house
1752

Box 3: folder 1b
Warrants to call town meetings
1749-52

Box 3: folder 2
Financial and Legal



Promissory note
1751

Box 3: folder 3
Receipt for purchase of slave
1745

Box 3: folder 4
Deeds from (mother) Anna Porter
1748-54

Box 3: folder 5
Deeds
1740s

Box 3: folder 6
Deeds
1750s

Box 3: folder 7
Probate inventory
1756

Box 3: folder 8
Note:

See also: Moses Porter estate inventories, box 172, folders 13-14

Elizabeth Porter Correspondence - outgoing



To Elizabeth Porter Phelps
1765

Box 3: folder 9
To Moses Porter (typed copies)
1755

Box 3: folder 10
To Moses Porter
1755

Box 3: folder 11
Genealogy information
1700s

Box 3: folder 12
BOX 4 - Charles Phelps Jr. (1743-1814)



Correspondence - outgoing



To Dan and Elizabeth Phelps Huntington
1801-08

Box 4: folder 1
To Elizabeth Phelps Huntington
1801-08

Box 4: folder 2
To Elizabeth Porter Phelps
1780-1801

Box 4: folder 3
To Elizabeth Porter Phelps
1802-13

Box 4: folder 4
To Moses (Charles) Porter Phelps
1787-90

Box 4: folder 5
To Moses (Charles) Porter Phelps
1791-1804

Box 4: folder 6
To Charles Porter Phelps
1805-14

Box 4: folder 7
To Col. Elisha Porter
1776

Box 4: folder 8
Miscellaneous [1779 July 28 letter possibly Charles Phelps Sr.]
1770s

Box 4: folder 9
Warrants to call town meetings
1805-10

Box 4: folder 10
Correspondence - incoming



From Gorham Parsons
1814

Box 4: folder 11
From Sezor Phelps (slave)
1776

Box 4: folder 12
From Solomom Phelps (brother)
1775

Box 4: folder 13
Financial



Receipts and promissory notes
1760s-1802

Box 4: folder 14
Bill of sale for slave (Caesar)
1770

Box 4: folder 15
Tax assessment
1777

Box 4: folder 16
Receipt for purchase of slave (Peggy)
1778

Box 4: folder 17
Misc. notes
1780s

Box 4: folder 18
Loan
1786

Box 4: folder 19
Bill of sale of dry goods
1788

Box 4: folder 20
Account with Charles Porter Phelps
1796

Box 4: folder 21
Tax assessment on chaise carriage
1798

Box 4: folder 22
Tax assessment
1799

Box 4: folder 23
Receipt from Humane Society
1802

Box 4: folder 24
Hadley tax assessment
1805

Box 4: folder 25
Charles Phelps estate - receipt for gravestones
1815

Box 4: folder 26
Legal



Land division
1770

Box 4: folder 27
Deeds
1770s

Box 4: folder 28
Deeds
1780s

Box 4: folder 29
Deeds
1790s

Box 4: folder 30
Deeds
1806-07

Box 4: folder 31
Indentures
1770s-1807

Box 4: folder 32
Estate division
1817

Box 4: folder 33
Miscellaneous



Wedding certificate
1770

Box 4: folder 34
Appointment as Justice of the Peace
1792

Box 4: folder 35
Appointment as Hampshire County assessor
1798

Box 4: folder 36
Phelps genealogy
1600s

Box 4: folder 37
BOX 5 - Elizabeth Porter Phelps (1747-1817) Correspondence



Correspondence - outgoing



To Dan Huntington
1801

Box 5: folder 1
To Elizabeth Phelps (Huntington) and Thankful Richmond
1794

Box 5: folder 2
To Elizabeth W. Phelps (Huntington)
1794-1801

Box 5: folder 3
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1802

Box 5: folder 4
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1803

Box 5: folder 5
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1804

Box 5: folder 6
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1805

Box 5: folder 7
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1806

Box 5: folder 8
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1807-09

Box 5: folder 9
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1810-11

Box 5: folder 10
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1812-13

Box 5: folder 11
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1814-15

Box 5: folder 12
Note:

NOTE: See box 6 for typed copies of most of the above letters.

To Charles Phelps
1780-1804

Box 5: folder 13
To Moses (Charles) Porter Phelps
1787-89

Box 5: folder 14
To Sarah Parsons Phelps
1801-10

Box 5: folder 15
To Penelope Williams
1769-89

Box 5: folder 16
Correspondence - incoming



From Thankful Richmond Hitchcock
1801

Box 5: folder 17
Poem by Thankful Richmond Hitchcock
1800

Box 5: folder 18
Thankful Richmond Hitchodk genealogy
1960s?

Box 5: folder 18a
Legal



Land lease witnessed by Elizabeth Phelps
1771

Box 5: folder 19
BOX 6 - Elizabeth Porter Phelps Correspondence (typed)



Correspondence - outgoing (typed copies)



To Elizabeth W. Phelps (Huntington)
1794-1803

Box 6: folder 1
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1804-05

Box 6: folder 2
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1806-08

Box 6: folder 3
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1809-11

Box 6: folder 4
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1812-15

Box 6: folder 5
Undated correspondence


Box 6
BOX 7 - Elizabeth Porter Phelps Diary



Diary - originals



1766-1784

Box 7: folder 1
1784-1802

Box 7: folder 2
1802-1812

Box 7: folder 3
1812-1817

Box 7: folder 4
Hadley births and deaths
1794-1815

Box 7: folder 5
Restrictions on use:

NOTE: The use of these originals is restricted, use the typed copies.

BOX 8 - Elizabeth Porter Phelps Diary - Typed Copy



1763-1778

Box 8: folder 1
1779-1789

Box 8: folder 2
1790-1800

Box 8: folder 3
1801-1805

Box 8: folder 4
Excerpts of mentions of work on house and grounds
1767-1811

Box 8: folder 5
Excerpts from diary
1760s-70s

Box 8: folder 6
Handwritten copy of diary
1812

Box 8: folder 7
Handwritten copy of births and deaths in Hadley
1794-1815

Box 8: folder 8
BOX 9 - Elizabeth Porter Phelps Diary



23 volumes of the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 1964 to 1969, containing Elizabeth Porter Phelps diary through 1805.


Box 9
BOX 9a - Elizabeth Porter Phelps Diary - Microfilm



Microfilm
1763-1812

Box 9a
BOX 10 - Charles Porter Phelps (1772-1857)



Correspondence - outgoing



To Dan Huntington
1802-10

Box 10: folder 1
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1791-1814

Box 10: folder 2
To Charles Phelps
1805-14

Box 10: folder 3
To Charles and Elizabeth Phelps
1807-09

Box 10: folder 4
To Charles and Elizabeth Phelps - typed copies
1805-14

Box 10: folder 5
To Sarah D. Parsons (Phelps)
1796-1806

Box 10: folder 6
Correspondence - incoming



Miscellaneous
1812-1844

Box 10: folder 7
Financial



Account book
1786

Box 10: folder 8
Harvard bills and correspondence
1786-87

Box 10: folder 9
Harvard bills
1789-91

Box 10: folder 10
Ship Insurance
1800-03

Box 10: folder 11
"Current Price of American Produce"
1811

Box 10: folder 12
Shipping bill
1812

Box 10: folder 13
Account book
1817

Box 10: folder 14
Examination of banks (Sunderland and Franklin)
1830

Box 10: folder 15
Bank correspondence
1830

Box 10: folder 16
Legal



Deeds of land purchased
1817-18

Box 10: folder 17
Deed to William Parsons
1823

Box 10: folder 18
Gift of land from William Parsons
1823

Box 10: folder 19
Miscellaneous



REDISTRIBUTED


Box 10: folder 20
Autobiography {first and last pages missing}
1857

Box 10: folder 21
Biographical notes by grand-daughter, Ellen Bullfinch
1900s

Box 10: folder 22
Obituary clipping
1857

Box 10: folder 23
The Boston Magazine
1783

Box 10: folder 24
Rules & orders to be observed in the Senate of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts of the year 1826.
1826

Box 10: folder 25
BOX 11 - Charles Porter Phelps Family



Clipping about Charles Porter Phelps family
1905

Box 11: folder 1
Sarah Parsons Phelps Correspondence-outgoing



To Elizabeth Phelps Huntington
1803

Box 11: folder 2
To Elizabeth Parsons
1803

Box 11: folder 3
To Elizabeth Porter Phelps
1801-05

Box 11: folder 4
To Elizabeth Porter Phelps
1807-1811

Box 11: folder 5
To Elizabeth Porter Phelps - typed
1801-1811

Box 11: folder 6
Sarah Parsons Phelps Miscellaneous



Notes on first year of marriage
1800-01

Box 11: folder 7
Confirmation
1801

Box 11: folder 8
Parsons Family



Theophilus Parsons' opinion on the Andriese Estate
1802

Box 11: folder 9
Sarah Davenport's old book
1771

Box 11: folder 10
Charles Porter Phelps' Children



Charles Phelps to parents Charles Porter and Sarah Phelps
1806-1815

Box 11: folder 11
Francis Phelps to Sarah Phelps
1800s

Box 11: folder 12
Caroline Phelps (Bullfinch) to Mary Dwight Huntington
1835

Box 11: folder 13
Arthur Phelps bill from E.D. Marsh
1893

Box 11: folder 14
Charlotte Phelps ? to Ellen Bullfinch
n.d.

Box 11: folder 14a
Susan Phelps to Ellen Bullfinch
1864

Box 11: folder 15
Susan Phelps - notes about her relationship to the Dickinson family
1850s

Box 11: folder 16
Theophilus Parsons Phelps obituary
1899

Box 11: folder 17
Edward T. Fisher letters received from his Phelps cousins ?
1860s

Box 11: folder 18
Series 2: HUNTINGTON FAMILY - EARLY GENERATIONS



Note:

NOTE: Folders preceded by an asterisk (*) are materials recently added to the collection.

BOX 12 - Elizabeth Whiting Phelps Huntington (1779-1847)



Correspondence



Correspondence - outgoing



To Bethia Huntington
1844-45

Box 12: folder 1
To Catherine Huntington
1829

Box 12: folder 2
To Edward P. Huntington
1826-31

Box 12: folder 3
To Edward P. Huntington
1836-40

Box 12: folder 4
To Edward P. Huntington
1841-43

Box 12: folder 5
To Elizabeth and Bethia Huntington
1813

Box 12: folder 6
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1831-35

Box 12: folder 7
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1837-40

Box 12: folder 8
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1841-44

Box 12: folder 9
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1845-47

Box 12: folder 10
To John Whiting Huntington
1828-32

Box 12: folder 11
To Mary D. Huntington
1831-35

Box 12: folder 12
To Charles Phelps
1800

Box 12: folder 13
To Charles Porter Phelps
1796-1801

Box 12: folder 14
To Charles Porter Phelps - typed copies
1796-1801

Box 12: folder 15
To Charles Porter and Sarah Phelps
1807-10

Box 12: folder 16
To Sarah Parsons (Phelps)
1797-99

Box 12: folder 17
To Sarah Parsons Phelps
1800-12

Box 12: folder 18
To Sarah Parsons Phelps - typed copies
1797-1806

Box 12: folder 19
Letter to the Editor of The Liberator
1834

Box 12: folder 20
Miscellaneous



"The matter of exoneration and acceptance of Elizabeth W. P. Huntington" by the Hadley church
1976

Box 12: folder 21
Original documents of Excommunication of Elizabeth W.P. Huntington
1821-1828

Box 12: folder 21a
Poems copied by Elizabeth W. Phelps (Huntington)
1796

Box 12: folder 22
Poetry by Elizabeth W. P. Huntington
1801

Box 12: folder 23
Poetry given to Mrs. Huntington by her friend C. H.
1800s

Box 12: folder 24
BOX 13 - Elizabeth Whiting Phelps Huntington (1779-1847)



Correspondence



Correspondence - outgoing to her mother Elizabeth Porter Phelps



Typed copies
1791-1803

Box 13: folder 1
Typed copies
1807, 1812

Box 13: folder 2
Typed copies
1813-14

Box 13: folder 3
1797

Box 13: folder 4
1801

Box 13: folder 5
1802

Box 13: folder 6
1803

Box 13: folder 7
1804

Box 13: folder 8
1805

Box 13: folder 9
1806

Box 13: folder 10
1807

Box 13: folder 11
1812-13

Box 13: folder 12
1814-15

Box 13: folder 13
BOX 14 - Elizabeth Whiting Phelps Huntington Diary



Diary



1798-1801

Box 14: folder 1
1801-03

Box 14: folder 2
1801-09

Box 14: folder 3
1805-07

Box 14: folder 4
1805-21

Box 14: folder 5
1809-18

Box 14: folder 6
1819-1830

Box 14: folder 7
1830-45

Box 14: folder 8
1834-38

Box 14: folder 9
1838-46

Box 14: folder 10
Typed excerpts
1815

Box 14: folder 11
BOX 15 - Dan Huntington (1774-1858)



Biographical Information



From Biographical Sketches of Graduates of Yale College
1911

Box 15: folder 1
Notes about Dan Huntington by James L. Huntington
1900s

Box 15: folder 2
Obituaries and clippings
1858-1903

Box 15: folder 3
Correspondence - outgoing



To Bethia Huntington
1822-50

Box 15: folder 4
To Charles Porter Phelps
1831

Box 15: folder 4a
To Edward P. Huntington
1825-43

Box 15: folder 5
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1827-28

Box 15: folder 6
To Elizabeth and Bethia Huntington
1813

Box 15: folder 7
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1836-40

Box 15: folder 8
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1841-44

Box 15: folder 9
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1845-47

Box 15: folder 10
To John Whiting Huntington
1825-32

Box 15: folder 11
To Mary D. Huntington
1832-35

Box 15: folder 12
To Charles Phelps
1803-07

Box 15: folder 13
To Charles Porter Phelps
1800-13

Box 15: folder 14
To Helen Frances "Fanny" Huntington Quincy
n.d.

Box 15: folder 14a
To Rev. Everett Hale (about Throop genealogy)
1848

Box 15: folder 15
To Executive Committee of the Hampshire, Franklin, and Hampden Agricultural Society
1837

Box 15: folder 16
Miscellaneous
1838

Box 15: folder 17
Correspondence - incoming



From John Brown (?) about Dan Huntington's conversion to Unitarianism
1835

Box 15: folder 18
From Josiah Quincy
1850

Box 15: folder 19
Miscellaneous
1844

Box 15: folder 20
BOX 16 - Dan Huntington (1774-1858)



Financial



Note - Samuel Porter to pay Dan Huntington for preaching in Hadley
1809

Box 16: folder 1
Account book for store
1821-49

Box 16: folder 2
Hadley valuations
1831

Box 16: folder 3
Dan Huntington correspondence outgoing concerning the division of his estate
1856

Box 16: folder 4
Estate inventory
1865

Box 16: folder 5
Legal



Deed of land to Theophilus and Theodore Huntington
1833

Box 16: folder 6
Professional



Yale M.A. diploma
1797

Box 16: folder 7
Notebook of religious writings
1800s

Box 16: folder 8
Charge delivered at ordination
1797

Box 16: folder 9
Report of committee acting on his resignation from the Litchfield church
1809

Box 16: folder 10
Notice of town meeting to consider Dan Huntington as candidate for the Hadley Ministry
1809

Box 16: folder 11
Call to the Middletown ministry
1809

Box 16: folder 12
The Ministry of Dan Huntington Middletown, Connecticut
1809-1816

Box 16: folder 13
Poster - Annual Fair Hampshire, Franklin, and Hampden Agricultural Society
1820

Box 16: folder 14
Hampshire, Franklin, and Hampden Agricultural Society report
1820

Box 16: folder 15
Dan Huntington's address to the Massachusetts Legislature
1822

Box 16: folder 16
Censure by the Congregational Church of Hadley
1835

Box 16: folder 17
Letter concerning his censure by the First Religious Society of Northfield
1836

Box 16: folder 18
Notes for sermons
1840s-50s

Box 16: folder 19
Massachusetts Bible Society
1843

Box 16: folder 20
Miscellaneous



Miscellaneous
1800s

Box 16: folder 21
Notebook
1800s

Box 16: folder 22
Clipping - "Litchfield and its Great Men"
?

Box 16: folder 23
Middletown church pamphlets
1918-1924

Box 16: folder 24
BOX 17 - Charles Phelps Huntington (1802-1868)



Correspondence - outgoing



To Edward Everett
1837

Box 17: folder 1
To Edward Phelps Huntington
1830s

Box 17: folder 2
To Edward Phelps Huntington
1840s

Box 17: folder 3
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1858

Box 17: folder 4
To Helen Frances Huntington
1834-62

Box 17: folder 5
To Helen Sophia Mills Huntington
[1830s?]

Box 17: folder 6
To John Whiting Huntington
1820s

Box 17: folder 7a
To Anna Mills (Mrs. Charles Mills)
[1840s?]

Box 17: folder 7b
To Sarah Mills Pierce
1840s-60s

Box 17: folder 8
Miscellaneous
1840s-1850s

Box 17: folder 9
Correspondence - incoming



From Daniel Webster (copy)
1836

Box 17: folder 10
Miscellaneous
1830s

Box 17: folder 11
Journals



Journal
1831

Box 17: folder 12
Published journal
1831-34

Box 17: folder 13
Account of the death of his wife, Helen Sophia Huntington
1844

Box 17: folder 14
Death of Helen Sophia Huntington
1844

Box 17: folder 15
Miscellaneous Manuscripts



Essays
1820-22

Box 17: folder 16
Lectures
[1830s-50s?]

Box 17: folder 17
Lectures
[1830s-50s?]

Box 17: folder 18
Clippings



Town of Huntington, Massachusetts
[1950s?]

Box 17: folder 19
Obituary
1868

Box 17: folder 20
Charles Phelps Huntington Portrait
1959

Box 17: folder 21
BOX 18 - Charles Phelps Huntington Family



Helen Sophia Mills Huntington



Correspondence - outgoing to Harriette Mills
n.d.

Box 18: folder 1a
Correspondence - outgoing to Helen Frances "Fanny" Huntington
1842-43

Box 18: folder 1b
Miscellaneous correspondence-incoming
1832

Box 18: folder 2
Charles Whiting Huntington



Correspondence - outgoing



To Charles Phelps Huntington
1850s

Box 18: folder 3
To E.H. Mills Huntington
1852?

Box 18: folder 4a
To Helen Frances "Fanny" Huntington
1846

Box 18: folder 4b
Edward Stanton Huntington



Correspondence - outgoing



To Charles Phelps Huntington
1862

Box 18: folder 5
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1890s

Box 18: folder 6
Mary E. Huntington



Poem by Mark Anthony DeWolfe Howe
1922

Box 18: folder 7
Reminiscences and obituaries
1920s

Box 18: folder 8
Obituary
1923

Box 18: folder 9
Charles Phelps Huntington family - miscellaneous, unidentified
n.d.

Box 18: folder 10
Mills family - REDISTRUBUTED



Charles H. Mills correspondence - incoming from Rufus Ellis about death of his sister Helen Sophia Huntington
1844

Box 18: folder 11
Charles H. Mills correspondence - incoming from Rufus Ellis about death of his sister Helen Sophia Huntington
1844

Box 18: folder 12
"Sally" Mills Pierce correspondence - incoming from Harriette Mills
1865

Box 18: folder 13
Harriette Mills miscellaneous correspondence - incoming
1823

Box 18: folder 14
"Letters of the Hon. E.H. Mills"
1881

Box 18: folder 15
BOX 19 - Dan and Elizabeth Huntington's Sons William (1804-1885), Edward (1807-1843), Theophilus (1811-1862)



William Pitkin Huntington



Correspondence - outgoing



To Bethia Huntington
1824-30

Box 19: folder 1
To Bethia Huntington
1831-50

Box 19: folder 2
To Dan Huntington
1836-40

Box 19: folder 3
To Edward P. Huntington
1825-39

Box 19: folder 4
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1820-44

Box 19: folder 5
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1876-84

Box 19: folder 6
To George Huntington
1860s-70s

Box 19: folder 7
To Mary Dwight Huntington
1826-38

Box 19: folder 8
Sermons



Religious manuscripts
1870s-80s

Box 19: folder 9
William Edwards Huntington (Son of William P.)



Correspondence - outgoing to George Huntington
1866-70

Box 19: folder 10
Correspondence - outgoing to Lilly Huntington
1916

Box 19: folder 11
"Phases of Modern Culture" published in The Alpha
1885-86

Box 19: folder 12
Memorials
1930

Box 19: folder 13
Edward Phelps Huntington



Correspondence - outgoing



To Bethia Huntington
1839

Box 19: folder 14
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1839-1840

Box 19: folder 15
To John Whiting Huntington
1829

Box 19: folder 16
Correspondence - incoming



From Lucian Minor
1830-35

Box 19: folder 17
From Lucian Minor
1836-40

Box 19: folder 18
From Lucian Minor
1841

Box 19: folder 19
Edward Phelps Huntington - Financial



Bills and receipts
1830s

Box 19: folder 20
Receipts
1833

Box 19: folder 21
Financial records
1830s

Box 19: folder 22
Concerning Nashua and Lowell Rail Road
1839

Box 19: folder 23
Helen Maria Williams Huntington (wife of Edward Huntington) obituary
1901

Box 19: folder 24
Theophilus Parsons Huntington



Correspondence received
1840

Box 19: folder 25
Farm accounts
1855-56

Box 19: folder 26
BOX 20 - Dan and Elizabeth Huntington's Daughters Bethia (1805-1879), Mary (1815-1839), Catherine (1817-1830)



Bethia Huntington



Correspondence - outgoing



To Edward T. Fisher
1863

Box 20: folder 1
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1874

Box 20: folder 2
To George Huntington
1860s-70s

Box 20: folder 3
To Mary D. Huntington
1830s

Box 20: folder 4
Journal



Commonplace book
1836-40

Box 20: folder 5
Accounts of deaths of John and Catherine Huntington, copied from the commonplace book
1830s

Box 20: folder 6
Mary D. Huntington



Correspondence - outgoing



To Bethia Huntington
1832

Box 20: folder 7
To Catherine Huntington
1829

Box 20: folder 8
To Charles Phelps Huntington
1827

Box 20: folder 9
To Dan Huntington, including a note from Emma Willard of Miss Willard's Academy
1832

Box 20: folder 10
To Edward P. Huntington
1833

Box 20: folder 11
To Caroline Phelps (Bullfinch)
1839

Box 20: folder 12
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1831-35

Box 20: folder 13
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1830s

Box 20: folder 14
To John Whiting Huntington
1825-32

Box 20: folder 15
Correspondence - incoming



From Susan Belcher
1831-35

Box 20: folder 16
Miscellaneous
1830-35

Box 20: folder 17
Catherine Huntington



Correspondence - outgoing



To John Whiting Huntington
1829-31

Box 20: folder 18
To Mary D. Huntington
1820s

Box 20: folder 19
Unidentified fragment of a diary
1827

Box 20: folder 20
BOX 21 - Theodore Gregson Huntington (1813-1885)



Correspondence - outgoing



To Edward P. Huntington
n.d.

Box 21: folder 1
To Elizabeth Sumner Huntington
1865

Box 21: folder 2
To George Huntington
1860s-80s

Box 21: folder 3
To Mary D. Huntington
1832

Box 21: folder 4
Sketches of Life in Hadley



Letters to Helen Frances Huntington (Quincy) describing life in Hadley. (Published in Boston in 1883 for private circulation.)
1880s

Box 21: folder 5
Copies of the letters of T.G. Huntington
1880s

Box 21: folder 6
Typed copies of the letters
1880s

Box 21: folder 7
Poetry by T.G. Huntington
[1884?]

Box 21: folder 8
BOX 22 - Frederic Dan Huntington (1819-1904)



Correspondence



Correspondence - outgoing



To Edward T. Fisher
1863

Box 22: folder 1
To Bethia Huntington
1840-45

Box 22: folder 2
To Bethia Huntington
1846-49

Box 22: folder 3
To Bethia Huntington
1850s

Box 22: folder 4
To Bethia Huntington
1860s

Box 22: folder 5
To Constant Huntington
1890s

Box 22: folder 6
To Dan Huntington
1840-47

Box 22: folder 7
To Dan Huntington
1848-67

Box 22: folder 8
To Edward P. Huntington
1830s

Box 22: folder 9
To Edward P. Huntington
1840s

Box 22: folder 10
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1830s

Box 22: folder 11
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1840-44

Box 22: folder 12
To Elizabeth W. Phelps Huntington
1845-46

Box 22: folder 13
To Catharine Huntington
n.d.

Box 22: folder *14
BOX 23 - Frederic Dan Huntington (1819-1904)



Correspondence



Correspondence - outgoing



To George Huntington
1860-66

Box 23: folder 1
To George Huntington
1867-72

Box 23: folder 2
To George Huntington
1873-83

Box 23: folder 3
To George Huntington
1884-89

Box 23: folder 4
To George Huntington
1890s-1901

Box 23: folder 5
To Hannah Sargent Huntington
1844-1904

Box 23: folder 6
To John Whiting Huntington
1825-32

Box 23: folder 7
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1870s-90s

Box 23: folder 8
To Mary D. Huntington
1830s

Box 23: folder 9
To Mary L. Huntington
1885

Box 23: folder 10
To Theodore G. Huntington
1857

Box 23: folder 11
To Hannah Sessions (Andrews)
1901

Box 23: folder 12
To Ruth Huntington Sessions
1860s-1902

Box 23: folder 13
To Helen Frances "Fanny" Huntington Quincy
1898

Box 23: folder 13a
To Rev. John Lane
1880s-90s

Box 23: folder 14
Miscellaneous
1880s-1902

Box 23: folder 15
Correspondence - incoming



From miscellaneous relatives
1895

Box 23: folder 16
About the Santee Sioux Mission, Nebraska
1867-69

Box 23: folder 17
Miscellaneous
1860s-90s

Box 23: folder 18
Miscellaneous
1888-89

Box 23: folder 19
BOX 24 - Frederic Dan Huntington (1819-1904)



Amherst College



Notebook
1835

Box 24: folder 1
Valedictory oration
1839

Box 24: folder 2
BOX 25 - Frederic Dan Huntington (1819-1904)



Miscellaneous Manuscripts



"The Building of Men" dedication of North Hadley schoolhouse
[1840s?]

Box 25: folder 1
Advertisement for sermon preached by Frederic Dan Huntington on Lincoln's death
n.d.

Box 25: folder 2
Address at Pockumtuck Historical Association field day
1889

Box 25: folder 3
Notebook of religious writings, no name, probably Frederic Dan Huntington
1860s-70s

Box 25: folder 4
Section of St. John's Bible
n.d.

Box 25: folder 5
Poem by FDH, "An Old Man's Old Testament Petitions"
1901

Box 25: folder *6
BOX 26 - Frederic Dan Huntington (1819-1904)



Printed Material (written by him)



Note:

NOTE: These were saved in the order they were found, so they are not organized chronologically.

List of his published work
1850s

Box 26: folder i
Bibliography by Douglas Stang
1967

Box 26: folder ii
Clippings and notes
1840s

Box 26: folder 1
Articles, speeches, and pamphlets
1860-90s

Box 26: folder 2
Articles and addresses
1862-1903

Box 26: folder 3
Articles and printed sermons
1860s-90s

Box 26: folder 4
Articles and pamphlets
1860s-1904

Box 26: folder 5
Clippings
1860s-1904

Box 26: folder 6
Clippings
1870s-1902

Box 26: folder 7
Articles
1870s-90s

Box 26: folder 8
Clippings
1887-1902

Box 26: folder 9
Articles and ordination service
1890s-1903

Box 26: folder 10
Pamphlets, letters, and sermons
1860s-1902

Box 26: folder 11
"Our Church Column" Syracuse Daily Courier
1886

Box 26: folder 12
The Church Review
1886

Box 26: folder 13
The Forum
1890

Box 26: folder 14
The Gospel Messenger
1894

Box 26: folder 15
The Churchman
1899

Box 26: folder 16
The Gospel Messenger
1902

Box 26: folder 17
BOX 27 - Frederic Dan Huntington (1819-1904)



Printed Material (about him)



College degrees and ordination
1842

Box 27: folder 1
Clippings, 25th anniversary of his consecration
1894

Box 27: folder 2
Emmanuel Church, Boston
1860s

Box 27: folder 3
Church publications
1850s-70s

Box 27: folder 4
Clippings about schools and hospitals
1870s-1900s

Box 27: folder 5
Articles about Indians
1870s-1902

Box 27: folder 6
Earth closet information
1860s

Box 27: folder 7
Clippings
1890s-1904

Box 27: folder 8
Clippings
1860s-1904

Box 27: folder 9
Clipping, 625 James Street, Syracuse
[1950s?]

Box 27: folder 10
Notes on Frederic Dan Huntington's relationship with the Dickinson family
[1960s?]

Box 27: folder 11
"The Bishop's Children" in the Episcopal church Historical Magazine
1974

Box 27: folder 12
BOX 28 - Frederic Dan (and George Putnam) Huntington



Obituaries and Memorials (also includes information about his estate)



Funeral clipping (FDH + GPH)
1904

Box 28: folder 1
Newspapers with obituaries (FDH + GPH)
1904

Box 28: folder 2
Funeral clippings (FDH + GPH)
1904

Box 28: folder 3
Obituaries (FDH + GPH)
1904

Box 28: folder 4
Clippings - obituaries, memorials, tributes
1904

Box 28: folder 5
Clippings - obituaries
1904

Box 28: folder 6
Clippings - obituaries
1904

Box 28: folder 7
Clippings - memorials and obituaries
1904

Box 28: folder 8
Frederic Dan Huntington estate executor's accounts
1910?

Box 28: folder 9
Grave lot perpetual care
1916

Box 28: folder 10
Frederic Dan Huntington lock of hair
1822

Box 28: folder 11
BOX 29 - Frederic Dan Huntington Pamphlets
1823-1860

Box 29
BOX 30 - Frederic Dan Huntington Pamphlets
1860-1890

Box 30
BOX 31 - Frederic Dan Huntington Pamphlets
1890-1940

Box 31
BOX 32 - Hannah Dane Sargent Huntington (1822-1910)



Correspondence - outgoing



To Hannnah Sessions (Andrews)
1900s

Box 32: folder 1
To Lucy Barrett
[1870s?]

Box 32: folder 2
To Bethia Huntington
1840s-50s

Box 32: folder 3
To Catharine Huntington
1893

Box 32: folder 4
To Catharine Huntington
1905

Box 32: folder *4a
To Constant Huntington
1888-92

Box 32: folder 5
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1874

Box 32: folder 6
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1899

Box 32: folder 7
To Henry Barrett Huntington
1883

Box 32: folder 8
To James L. Huntington
1890s-1910

Box 32: folder 9
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1870s-1910

Box 32: folder 10
To Mary Lincoln Huntington
1881

Box 32: folder 11
To Michael Paul Huntington
[1900s?]

Box 32: folder 12
To Ruth Huntington (Sessions)
1880s-1905, n.d.

Box 32: folder 13
To Georgiana W. Sargent
1896

Box 32: folder 14
To John O. Sargent
1843

Box 32: folder 15
Miscellaneous
1904

Box 32: folder 16
Correspondence - incoming



Congratulations on 50th anniversary
1893

Box 32: folder 17
Congratulations on 50th anniversary
1893

Box 32: folder 18
Letters of sympathy
1904

Box 32: folder 19
Miscellaneous
1904, n.d.

Box 32: folder 20
Miscellaneous Manuscripts



Book of poems
1839

Box 32: folder 21
Diary
n.d.

Box 32: folder 22
Clippings



Golden wedding anniversary
1893

Box 32: folder 23
Obituary
1910

Box 32: folder 24
Miscellaneous
n.d.

Box 32: folder 25
BOX 33 - Hannah Dane Sargent Huntington (1822-1910)



Correspondence - outgoing to George P. Huntington



1864

Box 33: folder 1
1865-66

Box 33: folder 2
1867-69

Box 33: folder 3
1870

Box 33: folder 4
1871-72

Box 33: folder 5
1873

Box 33: folder 6
1874

Box 33: folder 7
n.d.

Box 33: folder 8
BOX 34 - Hannah Dane Sargent Huntington (1822-1910)



Correspondence - outgoing to George P. Huntington



1875

Box 34: folder 1
1876

Box 34: folder 2
1877

Box 34: folder 3
1878

Box 34: folder 4
1879

Box 34: folder 5
BOX 35 - Hannah Dane Sargent Huntington (1822-1910)



Correspondence - outgoing to George P. Huntington



1880

Box 35: folder 1
1881-82

Box 35: folder 2
1883

Box 35: folder 3
1884

Box 35: folder 4
1885

Box 35: folder 5
1886

Box 35: folder 6
1887

Box 35: folder 7
1888

Box 35: folder 8
1889

Box 35: folder 9
1890

Box 35: folder 10
BOX 36 - Hannah Dane Sargent Huntington (1822-1910)



Correspondence - outgoing to George P. Huntington



1891

Box 36: folder 1
1892

Box 36: folder 2
1893

Box 36: folder 3
1894

Box 36: folder 4
1895-99

Box 36: folder 5
1900-02

Box 36: folder 6
1903-04

Box 36: folder 7
(probably before 1900)
n.d.

Box 36: folder 8
n.d.

Box 36: folder 9
n.d.

Box 36: folder *10
BOX 37 - Hannah Dane Sargent and Frederic Dan Huntington



Golden Wedding Anniversary Book
1893

Box 37
BOX 38 - Elijah Hunt Mills Huntington (1836-1891)



Letter book (containing correspondence incoming and outgoing)
1860s

Box 38: folder 1
Letter book
1886-88

Box 38: folder 2
Letter book
1888-90

Box 38: folder 3
BOX 39 - Elijah Hunt Mills Huntington and Family



E.H. Mills Huntington



Correspondence - outgoing



To Charles Phelps Huntington
1850s

Box 39: folder 1
To Charles Whiting Huntington
n.d.

Box 39: folder 2
To Ellen Greenough Huntington
1853

Box 39: folder 3
To Helen Frances Huntington (Quincy)
1850s-60s

Box 39: folder 4
To Elizabeth Huntington
1873

Box 39: folder 5
To Elizabeth Quincy Huntington
1890

Box 39: folder 6
To George P. Huntington
1852

Box 39: folder 7
E.H. Mills Huntington - Professional



Letter and shipping report from Calcutta
1855

Box 39: folder 8
China business documents
1880s

Box 39: folder 9
Knight of the Order of the Royal Sedang
1889

Box 39: folder 10
Elizabeth Huntington



Bridal remembrance presented to her by Admiral Sing
1888

Box 39: folder 11
Annie Oakes Huntington



Birth certificate
1875

Box 39: folder 12
Miscellaneous correspondence - outgoing
n.d.

Box 39: folder 13
Miscellaneous correspondence - incoming
n.d.

Box 39: folder 14
Obituary
1940

Box 39: folder 15
E.A. Huntington



Miscellaneous correspondence - incoming
1880s

Box 39: folder 16
BOX 40 - George Putnam Huntington (1844-1904)



Correspondence - Outgoing



To Caroline S. Barrett
1877-1885

Box 40: folder 1
To Henry Barrett
1884

Box 40: folder 2
To Lucy Barrett
1873

Box 40: folder 3a
To Arria S. Huntington
1864

Box 40: folder 3b
To Catharine Huntington
1890s

Box 40: folder 4
To Catharine Huntington
1899

Box 40: folder *5
To Catharine Huntington
1900-01

Box 40: folder *6
To Catharine Huntington
1902-04

Box 40: folder *7
To Catharine Huntington
n.d.

Box 40: folder *8
To Constant Huntington
1890s-1904

Box 40: folder 9
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1860s-90s

Box 40: folder 10
To Frederic Dane Huntington
[1899?]

Box 40: folder 11
To Hannah Sargent Huntington
1864-65

Box 40: folder 12
To Henry Barrett Huntington
1904

Box 40: folder 13
To James L. Huntington
1890s-1904

Box 40: folder 14
To Lilly Barrett (Huntington)
1870-72

Box 40: folder 15
To Lilly Barrett (Huntington)
1873

Box 40: folder 16
To Lilly Barrett (Huntington)
1873

Box 40: folder 17
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1880-87

Box 40: folder 18
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1888-89

Box 40: folder 19
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1890s-1904

Box 40: folder 20
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
n.d.

Box 40: folder 21
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
n.d.

Box 40: folder *22
To Ruth Huntington (Sessions)
1882

Box 40: folder 23
To Martha B. Wheaton
1860s

Box 40: folder 24
Miscellaneous
1860s-70s

Box 40: folder 25
To Constant ?
1860s

Box 40: folder 26
On Birth of Arria and George, by one of his parents (Hannah Dane?)
1910

Box 40: folder *27
BOX 41 - George Putnam Huntington (1844-1904)



Correspondence - Incoming



From A-B
1860s

Box 41: folder 1
From C-D
1860s

Box 41: folder 2
From E-H
1860s

Box 41: folder 3
From J-M
1860s

Box 41: folder 4
From P
1860s

Box 41: folder 5
From R-T
1860s

Box 41: folder 6
From W
1860s

Box 41: folder 7
From unidentified
1860s

Box 41: folder 8
BOX 42 - George Putnam Huntington (1844-1904)



Correspondence - Incoming



From (cousin) Mary C. Huntington
1867-69

Box 42: folder 1
From (cousin) Mary C. Huntington
1871-74

Box 42: folder 2
From William Reed Huntington
1860s-70s

Box 42: folder 3
From miscellaneous Huntingtons
1860s

Box 42: folder 4
MISNUMBERED


Box 42: folder 5
From Miscellaneous relatives
1860s-90s

Box 42: folder 6
From A-B
1870s

Box 42: folder 7
From C-E
1870s

Box 42: folder 8
From F-H
1870s

Box 42: folder 9
From K-L
1870s

Box 42: folder 10
From M
1870s

Box 42: folder 11
From N-R
1870s

Box 42: folder 12
From S-Z
1870s

Box 42: folder 13
From Martha B. Wheaton
1870s

Box 42: folder 14
From unidentified
1870s

Box 42: folder 15
From A-C
1880s

Box 42: folder 16
From D-G
1880s

Box 42: folder 17
From H-L
1880s

Box 42: folder 18
From Abby Little
1880s

Box 42: folder 19
From M-S
1880s

Box 42: folder 20
From T-Z and unidentified
1880s

Box 42: folder 21
Letter and picture from F. Bonney
1888

Box 42: folder 22
From A-G
1890s

Box 42: folder 23
From H-M
1890s

Box 42: folder 24
From N-R
1890s

Box 42: folder 25
From S-Z
1890s

Box 42: folder 26
From A-M
1900-04

Box 42: folder 27
From N-Z
1900-04

Box 42: folder 28
From A-F
n.d.

Box 42: folder 29
From G-P
n.d.

Box 42: folder 30
From Q-W
n.d.

Box 42: folder 31
From unidentified
n.d.

Box 42: folder 32
From unidentified
n.d.

Box 42: folder *32a
Correspondence concerning the Cofraternity of Saint Mary Magdalene
1881-83

Box 42: folder 33
Concerning Father Ignatius and Benjamin H. Paddock
1890

Box 42: folder 34
Correspondence from churches in Ashfield and Malden
1860s-90s

Box 42: folder 35
Commission on Public Moral Teaching correspondence
1902

Box 42: folder 36
Harvard correspondence
1860s

Box 42: folder 37
BOX 43 - George Putnam Huntington (1844-1904)



Religious Manuscripts



Sermons
1870s-1904?

Box 43: folder 1-19
Notebook
1870s-80s

Box 43: folder 20
BOX 44 - George Putnam Huntington (1844-1904)



Religious and Miscellaneous Manuscripts



Notebooks



Theology lectures
1866

Box 44: folder 1
Religious notes
1853

Box 44: folder 2
Religious notes
n.d.

Box 44: folder 3
Religious notes
1875-76

Box 44: folder 4
Religious notes
n.d.

Box 44: folder 5
"Outlines for sermons"
n.d.

Box 44: folder 6
Loose papers from notebooks
n.d.

Box 44: folder 7
Printed Material



Historical address at St. John's Church Ashfield
1887

Box 44: folder 8a
Article by George Huntington in the American Church Sunday School Magazine
1893

Box 44: folder 8b
"Poetry"
n.d.

Box 44: folder 9
Pamphlet about Cloyne House School
1902

Box 44: folder 10a
The Defender with notes by George Huntington
1904

Box 44: folder 10b
Clippings and misc. writings
n.d.

Box 44: folder 11
Miscellaneous Manuscripts



Clippings and misc. manuscripts
1860s-90s

Box 44: folder 12
Misc. manuscripts
1860s-90s

Box 44: folder 13
Misc. manuscripts
[1880s]

Box 44: folder 14
Journal of a sea voyage by GPH and Lilly
1888

Box 44: folder 15
Botanical and natural history notebook
1860s

Box 44: folder 16
Book of pressed flowers
1870s

Box 44: folder 17
Botanical notebook
1880s

Box 44: folder 18
Empty notebook
n.d.

Box 44: folder 19
Notebooks, appointments, etc.
1870s-1904

Box 44: folder 20
Misc. notebooks
n.d.

Box 44: folder 21
German notebook
[1850s-90s?]

Box 44: folder 22
BOX 45 - George Putnam Huntington (1844-1904)



Miscellaneous



Miscellaneous Manuscripts



"Aids to the Study of Dante"
1903

Box 45: folder 1
Dante notes
1903

Box 45: folder 2
Dante notebook
1903

Box 45: folder 3
Publication agreement for John Ruskin on the Divina Commedia
1903-05

Box 45: folder 4
Clippings about Comments of John Ruskin on the Divina Commedia
1903-04

Box 45: folder 5
Clippings
1903-04

Box 45: folder 6
Dante article in the Boston Evening Transcript
1903

Box 45: folder 7
Papers concerning The Treasury of the Psalter
1890s

Box 45: folder 8
Treasury of the Psalter publication correspondence
1880s

Box 45: folder 9
Will and Obituaries



Will and burial wishes
1903

Box 45: folder 10
Obituaries
1904

Box 45: folder 11
Letters of sympathy, memorials, etc.
1904

Box 45: folder 12
Harvard



Catalogues of officers and students
1859-61

Box 45: folder 13
Catalogues of officers and students
1861-62

Box 45: folder 14
Catalogues of officers and students
1862-68

Box 45: folder 15
Miscellaneous



"Miscellaneous"
n.d.

Box 45: folder 16
Miscellaneous
n.d.

Box 45: folder 17
Miscellaneous
n.d.

Box 45: folder 18
Billfold with calling cards
n.d.

Box 45: folder 19
Prescriptions and medical
1890-1904

Box 45: folder 20
Physical excersize instructions
1902

Box 45: folder 21
Printed material (clippings saved by GPH)



Dartmouth, President Tucker clippings
1890s

Box 45: folder 22
Phillips Brooks clippings
1890s

Box 45: folder 23
Society for Psychical Research
n.d.

Box 45: folder 24
"Shakespeare" clippings
1890s

Box 45: folder 25
"Socialistic" clippings
1890s

Box 45: folder 26
"Scientific" clippings
[1890s]

Box 45: folder 27
"Ecclesiastical" clippings
1896

Box 45: folder 28
Clippings
1896

Box 45: folder 29
Clippings
1890s-1900

Box 45: folder 30
Miscellaneous Church Material



Misc. church material
n.d.

Box 45: folder 31
St. Paul's Church sermon
1881

Box 45: folder 32
Church publications
1850s-60s

Box 45: folder 33
Church publications
n.d.

Box 45: folder 34
Church Financial



St. Paul's (Malden) finances
1869-74

Box 45: folder 35
St. Paul's, building of church
1872

Box 45: folder 36
St. Paul's finances
1875-79

Box 45: folder 37
St. Paul's finances
1880-83

Box 45: folder 38
Notebook of expenses
1880s

Box 45: folder 39
Bills, receipts, mostly church related
1890s

Box 45: folder 40
Church financial
1881-82

Box 45: folder 41
Financial (miscellaneous dates)



Bills and receipts
1890s-1900

Box 45: folder 42
Checks, bills, etc.
1870s-90s

Box 45: folder 43
Bills, receipts, etc.
1890s-1900

Box 45: folder 44
Expense and account books
n.d.

Box 45: folder 45
BOX 46 - George Putnam Huntington (1844-1904)



Financial



Bills and receipts
1869-70

Box 46: folder 1
Bills and receipts
1871-74

Box 46: folder 2
Bills and receipts
1874-76

Box 46: folder 3
Bills and receipts
1875

Box 46: folder 4
Bills and receipts
1876

Box 46: folder 5
Bills and receipts
1877

Box 46: folder 6
Bills and receipts
1877-78

Box 46: folder 7
Bills and receipts
1878-79

Box 46: folder 8
Bills and receipts
1878-80

Box 46: folder 9
Bills and receipts
1881

Box 46: folder 10
Bills and receipts
1881-82

Box 46: folder 11
Bills and receipts
1883-84

Box 46: folder 12
Bills and receipts
1885

Box 46: folder 13
Bills and receipts
1886-88

Box 46: folder 14
Bills and receipts
1888-89

Box 46: folder 15
Bills and receipts
1889-91

Box 46: folder 16
Bills and receipts
1890s

Box 46: folder 17
Bills and receipts
1891-93

Box 46: folder 18
Bills and receipts
1892-93

Box 46: folder 19
Bills and receipts
1893-94

Box 46: folder 20
Bills and receipts
1893-94

Box 46: folder 21
Bills and receipts
1894-95

Box 46: folder 22
Bills and receipts
1896

Box 46: folder 23
Bills and receipts
[1896?]

Box 46: folder 24
Bills and receipts
1895-97

Box 46: folder 25
Bills and receipts
1897-1901

Box 46: folder 26
Bills and receipts
1900-02

Box 46: folder 27
Bills and receipts
1903

Box 46: folder 28
Bills and receipts
1903-04

Box 46: folder 29
BOX 47 - George Putnam Huntington Family



Miscellaneous Unidentified Material



Misc. unidentified
n.d.

Box 47: folder 1
Misc. unidentified
n.d.

Box 47: folder 2
Misc. manuscripts and poems
n.d.

Box 47: folder 3
Unidentified letters
[1890s?]

Box 47: folder 4
Blank postcards
n.d.

Box 47: folder 5
BOX 48 - Lilly St. Agnan Barrett Huntington (1848-1926)



Correspondence - outgoing



Miscellaneous
[1890s-1920s?]

Box 48: folder 1
To Caroline Barrett (Littlefield)
1877-1885

Box 48: folder 2
To Lucy S. Barrett
1906-07

Box 48: folder 3
To Benjamin L. Huntington
1925

Box 48: folder 4
To Catharine Huntington
1900-1908, n.d.

Box 48: folder 5
To Catharine Huntington
1901

Box 48: folder *6
To Catharine Huntington
1903

Box 48: folder *7
To Catharine Huntington
1904

Box 48: folder *8
To Catharine Huntington
1905

Box 48: folder *9
To Catharine Huntington
1906

Box 48: folder *10
To Catharine Huntington
1907

Box 48: folder *11
To Catharine Huntington
1908

Box 48: folder *12
To Catharine Huntington
1909-14

Box 48: folder 13
To Catharine Huntington
1909

Box 48: folder *14
To Catharine Huntington
1910

Box 48: folder *15
To Catharine Huntington
1912

Box 48: folder *16
To Catharine Huntington
1914

Box 48: folder *18
To Catharine Huntington
Jan-Aug 1915

Box 48: folder *19
To Catharine Huntington
Sep-Dec 1915

Box 48: folder *20
To Catharine Huntington
Jan-May 1916

Box 48: folder *21
To Catharine Huntington
June-Dec 1916

Box 48: folder *22
To Catharine Huntington
Jan-May 1917

Box 48: folder *23
To Catharine Huntington
June-Dec 1917

Box 48: folder *24
To Catharine Huntington
1918

Box 48: folder *25
To Catharine Huntington
Jan.-Jun. 1919

Box 48: folder *26
To Catharine Huntington
Jul.-Dec. 1919

Box 48: folder *27
To Catharine Huntington
1920

Box 48: folder *28
To Catharine Huntington
1921

Box 48: folder *29
To Catharine Huntington
1922

Box 48: folder *30
To Catharine Huntington
1923

Box 48: folder *31
To Catharine Huntington
1924

Box 48: folder *32
To Catharine Huntington
1925

Box 48: folder *33
To Catharine Huntington
1926

Box 48: folder *34
To Catharine Huntington
n.d.

Box 48: folder *35
To Constant Huntington
1892-94

Box 48: folder 36
To Constant Huntington
1895-96

Box 48: folder *37
To Constant Huntington
1897-98

Box 48: folder 38
To Constant Huntington
1899

Box 48: folder 39
To Constant Huntington
1900-01

Box 48: folder 40
To Constant Huntington
1902-03

Box 48: folder 41
To Constant Huntington
[1890s?-1904?]

Box 48: folder 42
To Constant Huntington
[1890s?-1904?]

Box 48: folder 43
To Constant Huntington
1906

Box 48: folder *44
BOX 49 - Lilly St. Agnan Barrett Huntington (1848-1926)



Correspondence - outgoing



To Frederic Dan Huntington
1892

Box 49: folder 1
To Frederic Dane Huntington
1904-08

Box 49: folder 2
To George Huntington
1870s-1884

Box 49: folder 3
To George Huntington
1885-87

Box 49: folder 4
To George Huntington
1888-89

Box 49: folder 5
To George Huntington
1890s-1900

Box 49: folder 6
To George Huntington
[1900-04]

Box 49: folder 7
To Hannah Sargent Huntington
1906

Box 49: folder 8
To James L. Huntington
1895-1903, n.d.

Box 49: folder 9
To James L. Huntington
1904-06

Box 49: folder 10
To James L. Huntington
1907-10, n.d.

Box 49: folder 11
To James L. Huntington
1911-1926

Box 49: folder 12
BOX 50 - Lilly St. Agnan Barrett Huntington (1848-1926)



Correspondence - incoming



From miscellaneous relatives
1880s-1900s

Box 50: folder 1
From Huntington relative
n.d.

Box 50: folder *1a
From Mary C. Huntington
1873

Box 50: folder 2
From Sarah Bradley
1910-25

Box 50: folder 3
From miscellaneous
1860s

Box 50: folder 4
From miscellaneous
1870s

Box 50: folder 5
From miscellaneous
1880s

Box 50: folder 6
From miscellaneous
1870s-90s

Box 50: folder 7
BOX 51 - Lilly St. Agnan Barrett Huntington (1848-1926)



Correspondence - incoming



From A-C
1900-10

Box 51: folder 1
From D-N
1900-10

Box 51: folder 2
From P-Z
1900-10

Box 51: folder 3
Letters of sympathy from A-E
1904

Box 51: folder 4
Letters of sympathy from F-L
1904

Box 51: folder 5
Letters of sympathy from M-R
1904

Box 51: folder 6
Letters of sympathy from S-Z
1904

Box 51: folder 7
Unidentified



From miscellaneous
1910-19

Box 51: folder 8
From miscellaneous
1920-25

Box 51: folder 9
From miscellaneous
n.d.

Box 51: folder 10
From miscellaneous
1925

Box 51: folder *11
From J. Matthews, Treasurer of the Protestant Episcopal Church, N.H. (c/o Michael Paul Huntington)
1925

Box 51: folder *12
BOX 52 - Lilly St. Agnan Barrett Huntington (1848-1926)



Calling cards given to her
n.d.

Box 52: folder 1
Wedding invitations received
n.d.

Box 52: folder 2
George Huntington and Lilly Barrett wedding invitations
1874

Box 52: folder 3
Lilly St. A. Barrett calling card
[1860s-70s?]

Box 52: folder 4
Mrs. George P. Huntington calling cards
n.d.

Box 52: folder 5
Legal



Real estate and rentals
1920s

Box 52: folder 6
Will
1924

Box 52: folder 7
Handwritten Will
n.d.

Box 52: folder *7a
Financial



Financial
1900-1920s

Box 52: folder 8
Financial
1920s

Box 52: folder 9
Bills and receipts
1923-24

Box 52: folder 10
Bills and receipts
1923

Box 52: folder 11
Bills and receipts
1924-25

Box 52: folder 12
Grace Reed will and correspondence
1921

Box 52: folder 13
BOX 53 - Lilly St. Agnan Barrett Huntington (1848-1926)



Miscellaneous Manuscripts



Childhood manuscripts
1860s-70s

Box 53: folder 1
MISNUMBERED


Box 53: folder 2
Notebook
1869

Box 53: folder 3
Misc. manuscripts
[1870s?]

Box 53: folder 4
Misc. manuscripts
[1890s?]

Box 53: folder 5
Misc. manuscripts
[1890s?]

Box 53: folder 6
Writing piece (about Cecil Rhodes?) and newspaper clipping
n.d.

Box 53: folder *6a
Two writing pieces - "Extracts from Articles in the Academy" & "In Other Reviews on Mr. Swinburne"
n.d.

Box 53: folder *6b
Miscellaneous



Baptism certificate
1871

Box 53: folder 7
Miscellaneous church material
1890s-1904

Box 53: folder 8
Women's Literary Society, Hanover
1890s-1904

Box 53: folder 9
101st Regiment Field Artillery material
1917-19

Box 53: folder 10
Recipes
1920s

Box 53: folder 11
Rindge, N.H. Old Home Week pamphlet
1904

Box 53: folder 12
Miscellaneous
n.d.

Box 53: folder 13
Miscellaneous
n.d.

Box 53: folder 14
Miscellaneous
n.d.

Box 53: folder 15
Blank postcards
n.d.

Box 53: folder 16
BOX 54 - Lilly St. Agnan Barrett Huntington (1848-1926)



Printed Material (saved by LBH)



Clippings about church
1890s

Box 54: folder 1
Clippings about family members
1900s

Box 54: folder 2
Clippings about WWI
1918

Box 54: folder 3
Clippings about WWI
1918

Box 54: folder 4
Newspapers
1924

Box 54: folder 5
Misc. clippings
n.d.

Box 54: folder 6
Newspapers and clippings
1920s

Box 54: folder 7
Farmer's Almanac
1923-24

Box 54: folder 8
Atlantic Monthly
1923

Box 54: folder 9
BOX 55 - Arria Sargent Huntington (1848-1921)



Correspondence - outgoing



To Catharine Huntington
1910-20

Box 55: folder 1
To Catharine Huntington
1904

Box 55: folder *1a
To Catharine Huntington
1909-10

Box 55: folder *1b
To Constant Huntington
n.d.

Box 55: folder 2
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1883

Box 55: folder 3
To Frederic Dane Huntington
1902-07

Box 55: folder 4
To George Huntington
1860s

Box 55: folder 5
To George Huntington
1870s

Box 55: folder 6
To George Huntington
1880s

Box 55: folder 7
To George Huntington
1890-94

Box 55: folder 8
To George Huntington
1895-1904

Box 55: folder 9
To Hannah Sargent Huntington
1892

Box 55: folder 10
To Henry Barrett Huntington
n.d.

Box 55: folder 11
To James L. Huntington
1890s-1910

Box 55: folder 12
To James O.S. Huntington
n.d.

Box 55: folder 13
To James O.S. Huntington
n.d.

Box 55: folder 14
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1870s-80s

Box 55: folder 15
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1885-1920, n.d.

Box 55: folder 16
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
n.d.

Box 55: folder *16a
To Michael Paul Huntington
1899-1911

Box 55: folder 17
To Ruth Huntington Sessions
[1903?]

Box 55: folder 18
Miscellaneous
n.d.

Box 55: folder 19
Correspondence - incoming



Miscellaneous
1905-17

Box 55: folder 20
Diary



Diary (typed copy)
1862-63

Box 55: folder 21
Diary (typed copy)
1862-63

Box 55: folder 22
Printed Material



Published works
[1890s?]

Box 55: folder 23
Memoirs and Letters of Frederic Dan Huntington pamphlet
1906

Box 55: folder 24
Clippings and memorials
1921

Box 55: folder 25
Miscellaneous



Wallpaper scrap with note.
n.d.

Box 55: folder 26
"Hannah D.S. Huntington," by ASH
n.d.

Box 55: folder 27
BOX 56 - James Otis Sargent Huntington (1854-1935)



Correspondence - outgoing



To Benjamin L. Huntington
1930s

Box 56: folder 1
To Catharine Huntington
1906-15

Box 56: folder 2
To Catharine Huntington
1909, 1914

Box 56: folder *3
To Catharine Huntington
1913

Box 56: folder *4
To Catharine Huntington
1914

Box 56: folder *5
To Catharine Huntington
1915-17

Box 56: folder *6
To Catharine Huntington
1920-30

Box 56: folder *7
To Constant Huntington
1910

Box 56: folder 8
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1860-80

Box 56: folder 9
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1881-1890

Box 56: folder 10
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1891-1904

Box 56: folder 11
To Frederic Dane Huntington
1906

Box 56: folder 12
To George Huntington
1860s-70s

Box 56: folder 13
To George Huntington
1880s

Box 56: folder 14
To George Huntington
1890-1904

Box 56: folder 15
To Hannah Sargent Huntington
1870s-90

Box 56: folder 16
To Hannah Sargent Huntington
1890-1909

Box 56: folder 17
To James L. Huntington
1890s

Box 56: folder 18
To James L. Huntington
1903-24

Box 56: folder 19
To James L. Huntington
1925-35

Box 56: folder 20
To John H. Huntington
1931

Box 56: folder 21
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1902-20

Box 56: folder 22
To Mary L. Huntington
1890-1934

Box 56: folder 23
To Sarah Pierce Huntington
n.d.

Box 56: folder 24
Miscellaneous, incl. To Roger (Sessions?)
1917-1922

Box 56: folder 25
BOX 56a



To Ruth Gregson Huntington Sessions
Jan-June 1881

Box 56a: folder 1
To Ruth Gregson Huntington Sessions
July-Dec 1881

Box 56a: folder 2
To Ruth Gregson Huntington Sessions
1882

Box 56a: folder 3
To Ruth Gregson Huntington Sessions
1883

Box 56a: folder 4
Miscellaneous fragments
n.d.

Box 56a: folder 5
BOX 57 - James Otis Sargent Huntington (1854-1935)



School Material



St. John's School, Manlius, New York
1875-76

Box 57: folder 1
Catalog of Officers and Students of Harvard
1871-72

Box 57: folder 2
Book signed by Harvard men
[1732-1873]

Box 57: folder 3
BOX 58 - James Otis Sargent Huntington (1854-1935)



Printed Material



Articles by him
n.d.

Box 58: folder 1
"The Land and Labor Library" article
1887

Box 58: folder 2
The Forum library
1887

Box 58: folder 3
International Journal of Ethics article
1892

Box 58: folder 4
"Philanthropy and Morality" article in the International Journal of Ethics
1892

Box 58: folder 5
Clavary Church material
1870s

Box 58: folder 6
Clippings (mostly about Order of the Holy Cross)
1880s-90s

Box 58: folder 7
Order of the Holy Cross misc. material
n.d.

Box 58: folder 8
Obituaries
1935

Box 58: folder 9
Obituary, The Living Church magazine
1935

Box 58: folder 10
Memorial, The Holy Cross Magazine
1935

Box 58: folder 11
Letters about James O.S. Huntington to James Lincoln Huntington
1935

Box 58: folder 1
"James Otis Sargent Huntington" pamphlet by James Lincoln Huntington
1937

Box 58: folder 2
Article about James O.S. Huntington in The Holy Cross Magazine, by James Lincoln Huntington
1955

Box 58: folder 3
Pilgrimage to the Huntington House clippings
1956

Box 58: folder 4
BOX 59 - Mary Lincoln Huntington (1861-1936)



Correspondence - outgoing



To Catharine Huntington
[1905?]

Box 59: folder 1
To Catharine Huntington
Nov 1910, 1929

Box 59: folder *1a
To Constant Huntington
1880s

Box 59: folder 2
To Frederic Dane Huntington
1904-07

Box 59: folder 3
To George Huntington
1870s-80s

Box 59: folder 4
To George Huntington
1889-1904

Box 59: folder 5
To Hannah Sargent Huntington
1889-1910

Box 59: folder 6
To James L. Huntington
1888-1905, n.d.

Box 59: folder 7
To James O.S. Huntington
n.d.

Box 59: folder 8
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1879-1920s

Box 59: folder 9
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
n.d.

Box 59: folder *9a
To Michael Paul Huntington
1894-1904

Box 59: folder 10
To Ruth Huntington Sessions
n.d.

Box 59: folder 11
Letters of sympathy of Arria's death
1921

Box 59: folder 12
Obituary
1936

Box 59: folder 13
Series 3: HUNTINGTON FAMILY - LATER GENERATIONS



Note:

NOTE: Folders preceded by an asterisk (*) are materials recently added to the collection.

BOX 60 - Henry Barrett Huntington (1875-1965) and Family



Correspondence - outgoing



To Ellen S. Bullfinch
1904

Box 60: folder 1
To Catharine Huntington
1904-1962

Box 60: folder 2
To Catharine Huntington
1907-1910

Box 60: folder *3
To Catharine Huntington
1915-1928

Box 60: folder *4
To Catharine Huntington
1953

Box 60: folder *5
To Constant Huntington
1887-1922

Box 60: folder 6
To Frederic Dane Huntington
1904-29

Box 60: folder 7
To Genevieve Keefe Huntington
1949-51

Box 60: folder 8
To George Huntington
1880s-1893

Box 60: folder 9
To George Huntington
1894-99

Box 60: folder 10
To George Huntington
1900-04

Box 60: folder 11
To George Huntington
n.d.

Box 60: folder 12
To James L. Huntington
1880s-90s

Box 60: folder 13
To James L. Huntington
1897-1900

Box 60: folder 14
To James L. Huntington
1901-09

Box 60: folder 15
To James L. Huntington
1910-39

Box 60: folder 16
To James L. Huntington
1940-47

Box 60: folder 17
To James L. Huntington
1948-49

Box 60: folder 18
To James L. Huntington
1950-51

Box 60: folder 19
To James L. Huntington
1952-54

Box 60: folder 20
To James L. Huntington
1955-62

Box 60: folder 21
To James L. Huntington
n.d.

Box 60: folder 22
To John H. Huntington
1936

Box 60: folder 23
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
[1890s-1905?]

Box 60: folder 24
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1887-92

Box 60: folder 25
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1893-94

Box 60: folder 26
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1895-96

Box 60: folder 27
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1897-98

Box 60: folder 28
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1899-1903

Box 60: folder 29
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1887-1903

Box 60: folder 30
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1904-07

Box 60: folder 31
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1909

Box 60: folder *32
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1910-16

Box 60: folder 33
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1917-19, n.d.

Box 60: folder 34
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1925

Box 60: folder *35
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1920-25

Box 60: folder 36
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
n.d.

Box 60: folder *37
To Michael Paul Huntington
1887-1903

Box 60: folder 38
To Katherine O. Sargent Sumner
1898

Box 60: folder 39
Correspondence - incoming



Miscellaneous
n.d.

Box 60: folder 40
School Material



St. Paul's School report cards
1892-93

Box 60: folder 41
Horae Scholastica, St. Paul's School article by him
1892

Box 60: folder 42
Horae Scholastica, St. Paul's School
1893

Box 60: folder 43
Miscellaneous



Misc. manuscripts
n.d.

Box 60: folder 44
Clippings about him
1913-17

Box 60: folder 45
Miscellaneous
n.d.

Box 60: folder 46
Hadley farm material
1914

Box 60: folder 47
Alice Mason Huntington



Correspondence - outgoing



To Catharine Huntington
1905, n.d.

Box 60: folder 48
To Catharine Huntington
1909-10

Box 60: folder *49
To James L. Huntington
n.d.

Box 60: folder 50
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
n.d.

Box 60: folder 51
Miscellaneous
n.d.

Box 60: folder 52
Elizabeth Mason correspondence - outgoing to Frederic Dane Huntington
1907

Box 60: folder 53
Elizabeth Huntington Dyer and Family



Correspondence - outgoing



Elizabeth H. Dyer to Catharine Huntington
1920

Box 60: folder 54
Elizabeth H. Dyer to James L. and Genevieve Huntington
1940s-50s

Box 60: folder 55
Randolph Dyer to James L. Huntington
1950s

Box 60: folder 56
John Dyer to James L. Huntington
1954

Box 60: folder 57
Lisa Dyer Merrill to James L. Huntington
1940s-50s

Box 60: folder 58
Elizabeth Huntington and Randolph Dyer wedding invitation
1927

Box 60: folder 59
Mrs. Randolph Dyer clipping
1946

Box 60: folder 60
George Putnam Huntington



Correspondence - outgoing



To Catharine Huntington
1935

Box 60: folder *61
To Catharine Huntington
1948

Box 60: folder 62
To James L. Huntington
1952

Box 60: folder 63
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1919?

Box 60: folder 64
Obituary
1968

Box 60: folder 65
Arria S. Huntington (b. 1909)



Correspondence - outgoing



To James L. Huntington
1948

Box 60: folder 66
Mary Huntington Pettit



Correspondence - outgoing



To James L. Huntington
1948-49

Box 60: folder 67
BOX 61 - Constant Davis Huntington (1876-1962)



Correspondence - outgoing



To Lucy S. Barrett
n.d.

Box 61: folder 1
To Arria Huntington
1907

Box 61: folder 2
To Catharine Huntington
1896-1904

Box 61: folder 3
To Catharine Huntington
1900-10

Box 61: folder *4
To Catharine Huntington
1905-22

Box 61: folder 5
To Catharine Huntington
1911

Box 61: folder *6
To Catharine Huntington
1912

Box 61: folder *7
To Catharine Huntington
1913

Box 61: folder *8
To Catharine Huntington
1914

Box 61: folder *9
To Catharine Huntington
1915

Box 61: folder *10
To Catharine Huntington
1916

Box 61: folder *11
To Catharine Huntington
1917

Box 61: folder *12
To Catharine Huntington
1918

Box 61: folder *13
To Catharine Huntington
1919

Box 61: folder *14
To Catharine Huntington
1920

Box 61: folder *15
To Catharine Huntington
1921

Box 61: folder *16
To Catharine Huntington
1922

Box 61: folder *17
To Catharine Huntington
1923

Box 61: folder *18
To Catharine Huntington
1924

Box 61: folder *19
To Catharine Huntington
1926

Box 61: folder *20
To Catharine Huntington
1928

Box 61: folder *21
To Catharine Huntington
1929

Box 61: folder *22
To Catharine Huntington
1930

Box 61: folder *23
To Catharine Huntington
1932-39

Box 61: folder 24
To Catharine Huntington
1932

Box 61: folder *25
To Catharine Huntington
1933

Box 61: folder *26
To Catharine Huntington
1934

Box 61: folder *27
To Catharine Huntington
1935

Box 61: folder *28
To Catharine Huntington
1936

Box 61: folder *29
To Catharine Huntington
1937

Box 61: folder *30
To Catharine Huntington
1938

Box 61: folder *31
To Catharine Huntington
1939

Box 61: folder *32
To Catharine Huntington
1940-45

Box 61: folder 33
To Catharine Huntington
1940

Box 61: folder *34
To Catharine Huntington
1941

Box 61: folder *35
To Catharine Huntington
1942

Box 61: folder *36
To Catharine Huntington
1946-47

Box 61: folder 37
To Catharine Huntington
1946

Box 61: folder *38
To Catharine Huntington
1948-61

Box 61: folder 39
To Catharine Huntington
1950

Box 61: folder *40
To Catharine Huntington
1951

Box 61: folder *41
To Catharine Huntington
1952

Box 61: folder *42
To Catharine Huntington
1953

Box 61: folder *43
To Catharine Huntington
1954

Box 61: folder *44
To Catharine Huntington
1955

Box 61: folder *45
To Catharine Huntington
1957

Box 61: folder *46
To Catharine Huntington
1958

Box 61: folder *47
To Catharine Huntington
1959

Box 61: folder *48
To Catharine Huntington
1961

Box 61: folder *49
To Catharine Huntington
n.d.

Box 61: folder *50
Letters forwarded to Catharine from Constant
n.d.

Box 61: folder *51
To Frederic Dane Huntington
1896-1915

Box 61: folder 52
To George Huntington
1880s-1904

Box 61: folder 53
To Hannah Sargent Huntington
1906

Box 61: folder 54
To Henry Barrett Huntington
1900

Box 61: folder 55
To James L. Huntington
1902-1920s

Box 61: folder 56
To James L. Huntington
1925-29

Box 61: folder 57
To James L. Huntington
1930-43

Box 61: folder 58
BOX 62 - Constant Davis Huntington (1876-1962)



Correspondence - outgoing



"Letters from Constant and Ned Harkness about English pictures" to James L. Huntington
1939

Box 62: folder 1
To James L. Huntington
1944-49

Box 62: folder 2
To James L. Huntington
1950-54

Box 62: folder 3
To James L. Huntington
1955-62

Box 62: folder 4
To James O.S. Huntington
1920s

Box 62: folder 5
To John H. Huntington
1930s

Box 62: folder 6
BOX 63 - Constant Davis Huntington (1876-1962)



Correspondence - outgoing



To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1888-1893

Box 63: folder 1
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1894-95

Box 63: folder 2
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1896-97

Box 63: folder 3
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1898

Box 63: folder 4
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1899

Box 63: folder 5
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1900

Box 63: folder 6
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1900

Box 63: folder 7
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1901

Box 63: folder 8
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1902

Box 63: folder 9
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1903

Box 63: folder 10
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
[1893?-1903?]

Box 63: folder 11
MISNUMBERED


Box 63: folder 12
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1904

Box 63: folder 13
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1905

Box 63: folder 14
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1906

Box 63: folder 15
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1907

Box 63: folder 16
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1908

Box 63: folder 17
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1908

Box 63: folder 18
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1909

Box 63: folder 19
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1909

Box 63: folder 20
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1910

Box 63: folder 21
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1910

Box 63: folder 22
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1910s

Box 63: folder *22a
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1911

Box 63: folder 23
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1911

Box 63: folder 24
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1912

Box 63: folder 25
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1912

Box 63: folder 26
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1913

Box 63: folder 27
BOX 64 - Constant Davis Huntington (1876-1962) and Family



Correspondence - outgoing



To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1914

Box 64: folder 1
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1915

Box 64: folder 2
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1915

Box 64: folder 3
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1916

Box 64: folder 4
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1916

Box 64: folder 5
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1917

Box 64: folder 6
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1918

Box 64: folder 7
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1918

Box 64: folder 8
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1919

Box 64: folder 9
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1919

Box 64: folder 10
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1920

Box 64: folder 11
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1920s

Box 64: folder *11a
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1921

Box 64: folder 12
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1921

Box 64: folder 13
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1922

Box 64: folder 14
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1922

Box 64: folder 15
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1923

Box 64: folder 16
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1923

Box 64: folder 17
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1924

Box 64: folder 18
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1924

Box 64: folder 19
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1925

Box 64: folder 20
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
?

Box 64: folder 21
To Michael Paul Huntington
1898-1908

Box 64: folder 22
To Sarah Pierce Huntington
1933

Box 64: folder 23
Miscellaneous
1900

Box 64: folder 24
Correspondence - incoming



Telegrams concerning his father's death
1904

Box 64: folder 25
Concerning G.P. Putnam's Sons
1902-06

Box 64: folder 26
Miscellaneous
1880s-1906

Box 64: folder 27
Miscellaneous



Miscellaneous
?

Box 64: folder 28
Poetry
?

Box 64: folder 29
Holderness School report cards
1892-93

Box 64: folder 30
Clipping about his engagement to Gladys Parrish
1916

Box 64: folder 31
Obituary
1962

Box 64: folder 32
Gladys Parrish Huntington



Correspondence - outgoing



To Catharine Huntington
1916

Box 64: folder *33
To Catharine Huntington
1917

Box 64: folder *34
To Catharine Huntington
1918

Box 64: folder *35
To Catharine Huntington
1919

Box 64: folder *36
To Catharine Huntington
1920

Box 64: folder *37
To Catharine Huntington
1921

Box 64: folder *38
To Catharine Huntington
1921-44

Box 64: folder 39
To Catharine Huntington
1922

Box 64: folder *40
To Catharine Huntington
1923

Box 64: folder *41
To Catharine Huntington
1926

Box 64: folder *42
To Catharine Huntington
1928

Box 64: folder *43
To Catharine Huntington
1930

Box 64: folder *44
To Catharine Huntington
1932

Box 64: folder *45
To Catharine Huntington
1934

Box 64: folder *46
To Catharine Huntington
1935

Box 64: folder *47
To Catharine Huntington
1936

Box 64: folder *48
To Catharine Huntington
1938

Box 64: folder *49
To Catharine Huntington
1940

Box 64: folder *50
To Catharine Huntington
1943

Box 64: folder *51
To Catharine Huntington
1946-47

Box 64: folder 52
To Catharine Huntington
1948-50

Box 64: folder 53
To Catharine Huntington
1951-57

Box 64: folder 54
To Catharine Huntington
1952

Box 64: folder *55
To Catharine Huntington
1953

Box 64: folder *56
To Catharine Huntington
1954

Box 64: folder *57
To Catharine Huntington
1955

Box 64: folder *58
To Catharine Huntington
1957

Box 64: folder *59
To Catharine Huntington
1958

Box 64: folder *60
To Catharine Huntington
n.d.

Box 64: folder *61
To Frederic Dane Huntington
1917

Box 64: folder 62
To James L. Huntington
1940s-50s

Box 64: folder 63
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1915-23

Box 64: folder 64
Letter about Gladys Parrish
1916

Box 64: folder 65
Mrs. Alfred Parrish to Lilly Huntington
1916-22

Box 64: folder 66
Georgiana Mary Alfreda Huntington Urqhart and Family



Alfreda Urquhart to Catharine Huntington
1945-68

Box 64: folder 67
Alfreda Urquhart to Catharine Huntington
n.d.

Box 64: folder *68
Alfreda Urquhart to Catharine Huntington
1937

Box 64: folder *69
Alfreda Urquhart to Catharine Huntington
1943

Box 64: folder *70
Alfreda Urquhart to Catharine Huntington
1952

Box 64: folder *71
Alfreda Urquhart to Catharine Huntington
1966

Box 64: folder *72
Alfreda and Brian Urquhart to James L. Huntington
?

Box 64: folder 73
Alfreda Urquart misc. correspondence outgoing
?

Box 64: folder 74
Urquart family to Catharine Huntington
1960s

Box 64: folder 75
Alfreda to Edmund (Quincy?)
n.d.

Box 64: folder *76
Photos of Alfreda sent to Catharine Huntington by Constant Huntington
1930, 1941

Box 64: folder *77
BOX 65 - James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)



Correspondence - outgoing



To Ives Gammel
1960s?

Box 65: folder 1
To Arria Huntington
1903

Box 65: folder 2
To Benjamin L. Huntington
1940s

Box 65: folder 3
To Catharine Huntington
1901-05

Box 65: folder 4
To Catharine Huntington
1906

Box 65: folder *5
To Catharine Huntington
1910

Box 65: folder *6
To Catharine Huntington
1930s

Box 65: folder *7
To Catharine Huntington
1948-49

Box 65: folder 8
To Catharine Huntington
1940s-50s

Box 65: folder 9
To Catharine Huntington
1940s

Box 65: folder *10
To Catharine Huntington
1950s

Box 65: folder *11
To Catharine Huntington
1953

Box 65: folder 12
To Catharine Huntington
1954

Box 65: folder 13
To Catharine Huntington
1955-56

Box 65: folder 14
To Catharine Huntington
1957-60

Box 65: folder 15
To Catharine Huntington
1960s

Box 65: folder *16
To Catharine Huntington
1961

Box 65: folder 17
To Catharine Huntington
1961

Box 65: folder 18
To Catharine Huntington
1962

Box 65: folder 19
To Catharine Huntington
1963

Box 65: folder 20
To Catharine Huntington
1964

Box 65: folder 21
To Catharine Huntington
1965

Box 65: folder 22
To Catharine Huntington
1965

Box 65: folder 23
To Catharine Huntington
1966

Box 65: folder 24
To Constant Huntington
1890s?-1909?

Box 65: folder 25
To Constant Huntington
1895-96

Box 65: folder 26
To Constant Huntington
1896-97

Box 65: folder 27
To Constant Huntington
1898-99

Box 65: folder 28
To Constant Huntington
1900-01

Box 65: folder 29
To Constant Huntington
1901-02

Box 65: folder 30
To Constant Huntington
1940s-50s

Box 65: folder 31
To Frederic Dan Huntington
1886

Box 65: folder 32
To Frederic Dane Huntington
1903-1930s

Box 65: folder 33
To Genevieve Keefe Huntington
1948-52

Box 65: folder 34
To George Huntington
1880s-1904

Box 65: folder 35
To Henry Barrett Huntington
1898-1951

Box 65: folder 36
To John H. Huntington
1932-35

Box 65: folder 37
To John H. Huntington
1936-49

Box 65: folder 38
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1890s

Box 65: folder 39
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1900-02

Box 65: folder 40
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1903-04, ??

Box 65: folder 41
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1905-26

Box 65: folder 42
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1924

Box 65: folder *43
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1925

Box 65: folder *44
To Michael Paul Huntington
1895-1921

Box 65: folder 45
To Mary Paine Worthen
1951

Box 65: folder 46
Miscellaneous
?

Box 65: folder 47
Forty Acres Christmas cards
1930s-40s

Box 65: folder 48
To Genevieve Keefe Huntington, re: separation
1960

Box 65: folder 49
BOX 66 - James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)



Correspondence - incoming



From Miscellaneous Relatives



From relatives
1930s-50s

Box 66: folder 1
From relatives
1940s

Box 66: folder 2
"Family letters and clippings 1937+38+later"
1937-38

Box 66: folder 3
"Family letters 1948"
1948

Box 66: folder 4a
Bowditch, Barbour, Pierce, and Hales letters
n.d.

Box 66: folder 4b
From Vincent Yardley Bowditch
1905-07

Box 66: folder 5
From Sarah Bradley
1920s-40s

Box 66: folder 6
From Theresa Barrett Cochrane
1940s-50s

Box 66: folder 7
From Faith Gwynne Fisher
1950

Box 66: folder 8
From Fanny Quincy Howe
?

Box 66: folder 9
From Mark Anthony DeWolfe Howe
1940s-50s

Box 66: folder 10
From Carlo Huntington
1927-56

Box 66: folder 11
From Elizabeth Quincy Huntington
1890s-1910?

Box 66: folder 12
From Ellery M. Huntington
1936

Box 66: folder 13
From William E. Huntington
1920s

Box 66: folder 14
From Devens Barrett?
1900-1950s

Box 66: folder 15
About Family Members



Telegrams at his father George Huntington's death
1904

Box 66: folder 16
Letters from doctors about family members
1920s-30s

Box 66: folder 17
Letters about Beatrice Barrett
1930s-40s

Box 66: folder 18
Letters about Ben and John Huntington's schooling
1920s

Box 66: folder 19
Letters about John Huntington at school
1930s

Box 66: folder 20
Letters about John Huntington
1920s-30s

Box 66: folder 21a
"Life and Letters of JOSH"
1938

Box 66: folder 21b
Correspondence - incoming



Letters of sympathy at Freddie Huntington's death
1940

Box 66: folder 22a
Letters about Freddie's death
1941

Box 66: folder 22b
Correspondence with Mrs. Alfred Geraci about Freddie and Elsie Huntington's graves
1949

Box 66: folder 23
Nursing home correspondence and insurance records
1966-67

Box 66: folder 24
BOX 67 - James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)



Correspondence - incoming



Before 1910



Miscellaneous
1880s-90s

Box 67: folder 1
"Lenten Calendar letters"
1898-1900

Box 67: folder 2
Miscellaneous from A-K
1900-10

Box 67: folder 3
Miscellaneous from L-R
1900-10

Box 67: folder 4
Miscellaneous from S
1900-10

Box 67: folder 5
Miscellaneous from T-Z
1900-10

Box 67: folder 6
From Katrine Coolidge (Perkins)
1900-10

Box 67: folder 7
Portsmouth letters, Hovey
?

Box 67: folder 8
From Charles Goodhue King
1900-10

Box 67: folder 9
From Caroline Smith
1890s-1910

Box 67: folder 10
"Putnam Camp 1906 and letters from the campers"
1906

Box 67: folder 11
"Letters etc. about Dick Gambrill Newport 1904 and Mr. Green"
1904

Box 67: folder 12
From Hanover Friends "Round Robin Letters"



From Hanover friends
1950s-60s

Box 67: folder 13
From "Hanover boys and girls"
1950s-60s

Box 67: folder 14
From Hanover friends
1963

Box 67: folder 15
Letters from "Robins"
1964-65

Box 67: folder 16
From Frederick Chase
1905-20s

Box 67: folder 17
From "Emily Emerson and Helen Connor"
1890s-1920?

Box 67: folder 18
From Ethel Hazen Lillard
1900-20

Box 67: folder 19
From Ethel Hazen Lillard
1900-25

Box 67: folder 20
"From Harriette Barltett Perkins and Ned Perkins"
1890s-1914

Box 67: folder 21
From Julia Stimson
1895-1940s

Box 67: folder 22
From Julia Stimson
1895-1940s

Box 67: folder 23
From Arthur Virgin
1960s

Box 67: folder 24
From Dartmouth Classmates



"Letters from Dartmouth classmates"
1899-1903

Box 67: folder 25
"Letters from Dartmouth classmates"
1900-02

Box 67: folder 26
"Letters from Dartmouth classmates"
1920s-30s

Box 67: folder 27
"Letters from Dartmouth classmates"
1920s-30s

Box 67: folder 28
"Dartmouth College and the class of 1902"
1930s

Box 67: folder 29
From Arthur Ruggles
1900-20

Box 67: folder 30
From Arthur Ruggles
1920s

Box 67: folder 31
From Arthur Ruggles
1930s

Box 67: folder 32
From Arthur Ruggles
1940s

Box 67: folder 33
From Arthur Ruggles
1950s

Box 67: folder 34
From Harvard Classmates



"Letters in med. school days"
1900-07

Box 67: folder 35
"Harvard class of 1907 letters from classmates"
1905-20s

Box 67: folder 36
Letters from Harvard classmates
1906-30s

Box 67: folder 37
"Letters from classmates etc."
1905-40s

Box 67: folder 38
BOX 68 - James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)



Correspondence - incoming



Letters from Mary MacKinnon, Allan, Amy, Mr. and Mrs. Mack.
1890s-1910

Box 68: folder 1
"Naushon and letters from Milton etc."
[1905?]

Box 68: folder 2
"Letters from Miss French and Mrs. W.H. Reed"
1905-16

Box 68: folder 3
"Very important letters"
1904-30s

Box 68: folder 4
"Letters from the Hallowells of West Medford"
1910

Box 68: folder 5
"Letters from Larry Durgin while in the Service"
n.d.

Box 68: folder 6
"From Gerald Blake and John Moors"
1915-20s

Box 68: folder 7
Social letters from various men of Boston and environs, also Gessman letters
1910-30s

Box 68: folder 8
"Social letters from various men of Boston and environs"
1910-30s

Box 68: folder 9
Miscellaneous
1920s

Box 68: folder 10
"Hadley and Amherst"
1929-39

Box 68: folder 11
From Endicott Peabody (Groton School)
1920s

Box 68: folder 12
"Some special autographs"
1910-40s

Box 68: folder 13
From, Charles Curtis, George Reynolds, Ives Gammell, Mark A. DeWolfe Howe
1920s-30s

Box 68: folder 14
From Lewis Perry (Phillips Exeter)
1920s-30s

Box 68: folder 15
From Charles T. Copeland and Langdon Warner
1930s

Box 68: folder 16
Miscellaneous
1928-40

Box 68: folder 17
Miscellaneous
1930s-40s

Box 68: folder 18
Miscellaneous from A-G
1930s-40s

Box 68: folder 19
Miscellaneous from H-P
1930s-40s

Box 68: folder 20
Miscellaneous from R-Z + unidentified
1930s-40s

Box 68: folder 21
"Interesting and valuable personal letters"
1937-38

Box 68: folder 22
"Dr. Huntington personal correspondence"
1940s

Box 68: folder 23
"Correspondence and memos"
1944

Box 68: folder 24
"Correspondence 1945 and misc. items"
1945

Box 68: folder 25
"Correspondence 1945 and misc. items"
1945

Box 68: folder 26
"Correspondence and memos"
1943-44

Box 68: folder 27
"Letters from friends in Amherst and Northampton up to 1946"
1940s

Box 68: folder 28
"Odds and ends 1948"
1948

Box 68: folder 29
"Odds and ends 1948"
1948

Box 68: folder 30
"Odds and ends"
1949

Box 68: folder 31
"Odds and ends"
1949

Box 68: folder 32
"Odds and ends"
1953-54

Box 68: folder 33
80th birthday cards received
1960

Box 68: folder 34
Miscellaneous
1962

Box 68: folder 35
Miscellaneous
1963-64

Box 68: folder 36
From Genevieve Keefe Huntington
1960

Box 68: folder 37
Note:
Miscellaneous
1964-66

Box 68: folder 38
BOX 69 - James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)



Correspondence - incoming (Christmas cards)



Christmas cards to James L. Huntington and his wives Sarah Pierce Huntington and Genevieve Keefe Huntington
1920s-50s

Box 69: folder 1
BOX 70 - James Lincoln Huntington (1880 -1968)



Miscellaneous Childhood



Baptism and Confirmation certificates
1880, 1892

Box 70: folder 1
Lenten calendar
1900

Box 70: folder 2
St. John's School



Diary kept while at St. John's School
1896

Box 70: folder 3
Syracuse and St. John's School, Manlius letters and memorabilia, photographs, etc.
1896-97

Box 70: folder 4
Syracuse and St. John's School, Manlius letters and memorabilia, photographs, etc.
1896-97

Box 70: folder 5
Syracuse and St. John's School, Manlius letters and memorabilia, photographs, etc.
1896-97

Box 70: folder 6
"Drawings and clippings"
1897

Box 70: folder 7
"History of the Class of 1897"
1897

Box 70: folder 8
BOX 71 - James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)



School Material



Dartmouth



Hanover memorabilia
1890s

Box 71: folder 1
Dartmouth catalog
1900-01

Box 71: folder 2
Dartmouth commencement program
1902

Box 71: folder 3
Miscellaneous material
n.d.

Box 71: folder 4
Miscellaneous material
n.d.

Box 71: folder 5
Sermon by President Tucker
n.d.

Box 71: folder 6
The Dartmouth Magazine
1904

Box 71: folder 7
The Dartmouth Bi-Monthly
1907

Box 71: folder 8
Alpha Delta Phi material
1908-16

Box 71: folder 9
Dartmouth class of 1902
1920s-50s

Box 71: folder 10
Dartmouth Alumni Magazines
1950s-60s

Box 71: folder 11
Harvard



Harvard Medical School material
1904-05

Box 71: folder 12
Miscellaneous material
1904-19

Box 71: folder 13
Harvard periodicals
1920s-30s

Box 71: folder 14
Harvard Alumni Bulletins
1930s-40s

Box 71: folder 15
BOX 72 - James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)



Clubs and Societies



Tavern Club



Tavern Club history by James Huntington
n.d.

Box 72: folder 1
Tavern Club business
1920s-40s

Box 72: folder 2
"Tavern Club and Taverners"
19251938

Box 72: folder 3
"Tavern Club"
1940s

Box 72: folder 4
"Tavern Club"
1940s

Box 72: folder 5
"Tavern Clerk 1946-1949"
1946-49

Box 72: folder 6
"Letters from Taverners"
1920s-30s

Box 72: folder 7
"Letters from Taverners"
1920s-30s

Box 72: folder 8
"Letters from Taverners"
1920s-30s

Box 72: folder 9
"Letters from Taverners"
1920s-30s

Box 72: folder 10
"Owen Wister and Dan Wister"
1930s

Box 72: folder 11
Henry Vaughan, Holker Abbott"
1930s

Box 72: folder 12
"Letters from Taverners up to 1946"
1940s

Box 72: folder 13
"Letters from Taverners up to 1946"
1940s

Box 72: folder 14
"Francis Shaw Sturgis"
1915-1922

Box 72: folder 15
"Francis Shaw Sturgis"
1915-1922

Box 72: folder 16
Correspondence - incoming to James Huntington
1950-52

Box 72: folder 17
Correspondence - incoming to James Huntington
1952-53

Box 72: folder 18
"Letters from Taverners"
1950s-60s

Box 72: folder 19
"Letters from Taverners"
1960s

Box 72: folder 20
"Letters from Taverners"
1964

Box 72: folder 21
Tavern Club plays
1920s-40s

Box 72: folder 22
Tavern Club plays
1920s-40s

Box 72: folder 23
Tavern Club plays
1930s

Box 72: folder 24
Tavern Club tribute to James Lincoln Huntington
1968

Box 72: folder 25
Obstetrical and Gynecological Travel Club



Club business
1920s-41

Box 72: folder 26
Dr. Wilbur Ward correspondence to James Huntington
1912-39

Box 72: folder 27
Letters from Travel Club members
1920s

Box 72: folder 28
Letters from Travel Club members
1920s-41

Box 72: folder 29
Letters from Travel Club members
1920s-41

Box 72: folder 30
Letters from Travel Club members
1933-41

Box 72: folder 31
Letters from Travel Club members
1952-54

Box 72: folder 32
Letters from Travel Club members
1952-54

Box 72: folder 33
Letters from Travel Club members
1956-66

Box 72: folder 34
Letters from Travel Club members
1956-66

Box 72: folder 35
Letters from Travel Club members
1940s

Box 72: folder 36
Letters from Travel Club members
1947

Box 72: folder 37
Travel Club members lists
n.d.

Box 72: folder 38
BOX 73 - James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)



Clubs and Societies



Trinity Church, Boston



Correspondence - incoming (concerning the Church)
1930s

Box 73: folder 1
Correspondence - incoming
1935-38

Box 73: folder 2
Church business
1930s

Box 73: folder 3
Clippings
1930+37

Box 73: folder 4
Programs and publications
1930s

Box 73: folder 5
Miscellaneous



Massachusetts Society of Mayflower Descendants
1928

Box 73: folder 6
Society of the Sons of the Revolution
1928

Box 73: folder 7
Elks Club Program
1945

Box 73: folder 8
Pipe Organ Pumpers
1930s

Box 73: folder 9
Pipe Organ Pumpers
1937

Box 73: folder 10
Miscellaneous "Cards of membership, Invitations, Announcements..."
1900-40s

Box 73: folder 11
Miscellaneous clubs, societies, and invitations
1900-40s

Box 73: folder 12
Miscellaneous clubs, societies, and invitations
1900-40s

Box 73: folder 13
BOX 74 - James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)



Clubs and Societies



Colonial Society of Massachusetts



Certificate of membership
1929

Box 74: folder 1
"Colonial Society and letters from Sam Morrison"
1930s

Box 74: folder 2
Correspondence - incoming
1937-38

Box 74: folder 3
Meeting announcements
1930s-40s

Box 74: folder 4
Annual dinner menus
1930s-40s

Box 74: folder 5
Meeting at "Forty Acres"
1943

Box 74: folder 6
Lodge of St. Andrews



150th Anniversary
1906

Box 74: folder 7
Photographs
1931

Box 74: folder 8
Correspondence - incoming
1920s-30s

Box 74: folder 9
Correspondence - incoming
1920s-30s

Box 74: folder 10
Correspondence - incoming
1937+41

Box 74: folder 11
Aesculapian Club



Correspondence - incoming
1930s

Box 74: folder 12
Correspondence - incoming
1947

Box 74: folder 13
Correspondence - incoming
1952-54

Box 74: folder 14
Correspondence - incoming
1952-54

Box 74: folder 15
Aesculapian Club continued



The Bulletin
1920s-30s

Box 74: folder 13
The Bulletin
1930s-50s

Box 74: folder 14
Miscellaneous publications
n.d.

Box 74: folder 15
BOX 75 - James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)



Professional



Medical Manuscripts (written by James L. Huntington)



Papers about midwives
1912-38

Box 75: folder 1
"Out of the Deep" about John H. Huntington
[1940s?]

Box 75: folder 2
Correspondence - incoming about "Out of the Deep"
1949-50

Box 75: folder 3
Medical lectures and articles
[1918-34]

Box 75: folder 4
Lectures and articles
n.d.

Box 75: folder 5
Lectures and articles
1929-39, n.d.

Box 75: folder 6
Medical pamphlets
1911-28

Box 75: folder 7
Medical notes
n.d.

Box 75: folder 8
Medical notebook
1922

Box 75: folder 9
Medical papers
n.d.

Box 75: folder 10
Medical papers
n.d.

Box 75: folder 11
Medical papers
n.d.

Box 75: folder 12
Medical papers
1940

Box 75: folder 13
Medical notes
n.d.

Box 75: folder 14
Medical classes and schools (taught by Dr. Huntington)
1929-42, n.d.

Box 75: folder 15
Hospitals



Day Orders, ward A
1907

Box 75: folder 16
Study in Germany
1909

Box 75: folder 17
Germany trip
1910

Box 75: folder 18
Cambridge Hospital
[1930s-40s]

Box 75: folder 19
Cambridge Hospital
[1930s-40s]

Box 75: folder 20
Cambridge Hospital
[1920s-30s]

Box 75: folder 21
MGH, Mass. Med., Harv. Med., Cambridge Hospital, Med. Library
[1906-1930s]

Box 75: folder 22
Clippings about Massachusetts General Hospital
1852

Box 75: folder 23
Massachusetts General Hospital
1947, n.d.

Box 75: folder 24
Boston Lying In Hospital
1916, 1940

Box 75: folder 25
Cooley Dickinson Hospital
1944, 1961, n.d.

Box 75: folder 26
Household Nursing Association
1935+38, n.d.

Box 75: folder 27
Medical Societies



"Notifications of election and appointment to Med. social and honorary positions"
1911-30

Box 75: folder 28
Medical and Surgical Associates
1941, n.d.

Box 75: folder 29
American College of Surgeons
1923+41, n.d.

Box 75: folder 30
Massachusetts Medical Society
1913-15, 1937

Box 75: folder 31
Boylston Medical Society of Harvard
1907

Box 75: folder 32
Obstetrical and Gynecological Society
1925-41

Box 75: folder 33
Miscellaneous



Professional clippings
n.d.

Box 75: folder 34
Copper plate for office business cards
n.d.

Box 75: folder 35
Red Cross material
1955

Box 75: folder 36
War- fuel rations and car
1945

Box 75: folder 37
Appointment books
1911-16

Box 75: folder 38
Calendar
1943

Box 75: folder 39
Account book
1947-48

Box 75: folder 40
Daily log
1948

Box 75: folder 41
Medical supplies catalogs
1936, n.d.

Box 75: folder 42
Miscellaneous
n.d.

Box 75: folder 43
Miscellaneous
n.d.

Box 75: folder 44
BOX 76 - James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)



Professional Correspondence - incoming



"Huntington-Covanagh controversy"
1947-51

Box 76: folder 1
"Huntington-Cavanagh controversy"
1947-51

Box 76: folder 2
"Grateful patient letters"
1938, n.d.

Box 76: folder 3
From patients
1939-43

Box 76: folder 4
Professional correspondence - incoming
1905-1920s

Box 76: folder 5
Professional correspondence - incoming
1912-35

Box 76: folder 6
Professional correspondence - incoming
1920s-30s

Box 76: folder 7
Professional correspondence - incoming
1920s-40s

Box 76: folder 8
Professional correspondence - incoming
1902-40

Box 76: folder 9
Professional correspondence - incoming
1916-40

Box 76: folder 10
Professional correspondence - incoming
1939-41, n.d.

Box 76: folder 11
"Medical letters"
1920-30

Box 76: folder 12
Professional correspondence - incoming and some papers
1936-38

Box 76: folder 13
HMS + MGH, Aesculapian, boyleston, and other medical data, including letters from Francis Peabody, C.O. Day, and Donald Gregg
1912-39

Box 76: folder 14
From Dr. Banton
1952

Box 76: folder 14
Correspondence - outgoing to Dr. Banton
1950s

Box 76: folder 15
From Dr. Faxon
1951

Box 76: folder 16
Correspondence - outgoing to Dr. Faxon
1951

Box 76: folder 17
From Henry James, M.D.
1910-30

Box 76: folder 17a
From Isabel Keep
1936-40

Box 76: folder 18
From Mrs. William Lowell Putnam
1930, n.d.

Box 76: folder 19
From Dr. Streeter and paper on miscarriages
1920s

Box 76: folder 20
From Sidney Towle
1929-30

Box 76: folder 21
"Social letters from Boston (and others) Matrons and maids"
1904-30s, n.d.

Box 76: folder 22
"Social letters from Boston (and others) Matrons and maids"
1904-30s, n.d.

Box 76: folder 23
"Social letters from Boston (and others) Matrons and maids"
1904-30s, n.d.

Box 76: folder 24
"Social letters from Boston (and others) Matrons and maids"
1904-30s, n.d.

Box 76: folder 25
From Nurses
1922-30s, n.d.

Box 76: folder 26
"Biographies and memorials"
n.d.

Box 76: folder 27
Miscellaneous and Unidentified Material



Sarah Pierce and James Huntington wedding invitation
1911

Box 76: folder 28
A. Genevieve Keefe and James Huntington wedding announcement
1944

Box 76: folder 29
Dr. James Lincoln Huntington calling card plates
n.d.

Box 76: folder 30
Poetry by James Huntington
n.d.

Box 76: folder 31
Miscellaneous manuscripts
n.d.

Box 76: folder 32
Miscellaneous, unidentified
n.d.

Box 76: folder 33
Miscellaneous, unidentified
n.d.

Box 76: folder 34
Miscellaneous, unidentified
n.d.

Box 76: folder 35
Weight loss record
n.d.

Box 76: folder 36
TV Guide
1961

Box 76: folder 37
Shorthand notebook ?
n.d.

Box 76: folder 38
Boston Globe, flood souvenier section
1936

Box 76: folder 39
Blank postcards
n.d.

Box 76: folder 40
Memorial pamphlets
n.d.

Box 76: folder 41
Rufus Choate pictures
n.d.

Box 76: folder 42
Miscellaneous clippings
n.d.

Box 76: folder 43
Puck newspaper
n.d.

Box 76: folder 44
"Coast Sketches"
1888

Box 76: folder 45
WWI data and memorabilia
1914-17, n.d.

Box 76: folder 46
Anti-Roosevelt protest - form letter - 4 copies
n.d. (c. 1930's)

Box 76: folder 47
BOX 77 - James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)



Financial



Bills and receipts
1894

Box 77: folder 1
Bills and receipts
?

Box 77: folder 2
Insurance
1930s/40s

Box 77: folder 3
Household appliances
?

Box 77: folder 4
Finances
1921-24

Box 77: folder 5
Finances
1918+25

Box 77: folder 6
Audit reports
1930s

Box 77: folder 7
311 Marlboro Street mortgage and repairs
1930s

Box 77: folder 8
311 Marlboro Street mortgage and repairs
1930s

Box 77: folder 9
Bills
1939-43

Box 77: folder 10
Legal and financial
1930s-40s

Box 77: folder 11
Bills and receipts
1940s

Box 77: folder 12
Bills and receipts
1943

Box 77: folder 13
Sale of Boston house
1943

Box 77: folder 14
Check book
1944

Box 77: folder 15
Personal bills
1945

Box 77: folder 16
Personal and household receipts
1945

Box 77: folder 17
Personal and household bills
1946

Box 77: folder 18
Personal and household bills
1946

Box 77: folder 19
Income tax
1946

Box 77: folder 20
"Household bills and personal"
1947

Box 77: folder 21
"Household bills and personal"
1948

Box 77: folder 22
"Household bills and personal"
1949

Box 77: folder 23
Tax deductions
1950

Box 77: folder 24
Bills and receipts
1953

Box 77: folder 25
Bills and receipts
1953

Box 77: folder 26
Genevieve Keefe Huntington bills and receipts
1944-45

Box 77: folder 27
Genevieve Keefe Huntington financial
1930s

Box 77: folder 28
BOX 78 - James Lincoln Huntington and Family



Bank statements and check books
1920s-40s

Box 78
BOX 79 - James Lincoln Huntington and Family



Bank statements and check books
1940s-60s

Box 79
BOX 80a - James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)



Journal



Journal and scrapbook of the house at "Forty Acres" in Hadley
1922-1936

Box 80a
BOX 80b - James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)



Journal



Journal and scrapbook of the house at "Forty Acres" in Hadley
1936-1942

Box 80b
BOX 81 - James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)



Scrapbook



Scrapbook of the house at "Forty Acres" in Hadley
1942-1964

Box 81
Journal of trip with Tom Barbour
1931

Box 81
Journal of trip with Tom Barbour
1936

Box 81
BOX 82 - James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)



"Forty Acres"



Correspondence among family about "Forty Acres" and expense accounts
1920s

Box 82: folder 1
Letters about transfer of property
1929

Box 82: folder 2
Controversy letters from HBH, FDH, and Amerige about division of land - 1929
1929

Box 82: folder 3
"1929 Controversy letters between Constant and James re. sale of house and grounds"
1929

Box 82: folder 4
Deeds and letters relating to purchase and transfer of "Forty Acres" to James L. Huntington
1929

Box 82: folder 5
Re: establishment of Foundation/fate of house
1939

Box 82: folder 5a
Correspondence - incoming



Letter about sales of property by Henry Barrett Huntington
1947

Box 82: folder 6
From historical societies
1920s

Box 82: folder 7
From Sumner Appleton (Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities)
1927-40s

Box 82: folder 8
Hadley letters, etc.
1920s-30s

Box 82: folder 9
Hadley letters, etc.
1920s-30s

Box 82: folder 10
Hadley letters, etc.
1920s-30s

Box 82: folder 11
From Historic American Buildings Survey
1935

Box 82: folder 12
Correspondence - incoming and outgoing



Incorporation of "Forty Acres"
1947

Box 82: folder 13
Incorporation of "Forty Acres"
1947

Box 82: folder 14
Incorporation of "Forty Acres"
1948

Box 82: folder 15
Incorporation of "Forty Acres"
1949

Box 82: folder 16
Incoming congratulations of "The Book" (Forty Acres)
1949

Box 82: folder 17
"Correspondence regarding "The Book"
1948-49

Box 82: folder 18
"Odds and ends regarding "The Book"
1949

Box 82: folder 19
Hastings House correspondence
1950

Box 82: folder 20
Incorporation of "Forty Acres"
1950

Box 82: folder 21
Incorporation of "Forty Acres"
1950-51

Box 82: folder 22
Incorporation of "Forty Acres"
1950-51

Box 82: folder 23
Incorporation of "Forty Acres"
1950-51

Box 82: folder 24
Incorporation of "Forty Acres"
1950-51

Box 82: folder 25
"Worksheets PPH"
1951-55

Box 82: folder 26
Incorporation of "Forty Acres"
1952

Box 82: folder 27
Incorporation of "Forty Acres"
1953

Box 82: folder 28
Incorporation of "Forty Acres"
1953

Box 82: folder 29
Incorporation of "Forty Acres"
n.d.

Box 82: folder 30
Miscellaneous Correspondence - incoming
1950s

Box 82: folder 31
Porter-Phelps-Huntington House bills
1953

Box 82: folder 32
Porter-Phelps-Huntington House bills
1953

Box 82: folder 33
"Dissolving the Corporation - 1955 only"
1955

Box 82: folder 34
Reshingling shed roof
1955-56

Box 82: folder 35
Information on repairing ceramics
1955

Box 82: folder 36
"Porter-Phelps-Huntington House reports to Bill Dwyer for 1956"
1956

Box 82: folder 37
Correspondence - incoming



From William E. Dwyer
1951-67

Box 82: folder 38
From Juliette Tomlinson, Connecticut Valley Historical Society
1955-60

Box 82: folder 39
From John C. Parker (architect)
1957-60

Box 82: folder 40
From Allister McDougall
1957-60

Box 82: folder 41
"Estimates in Bishop Huntington House heating and insulation"
1958

Box 82: folder 42
From Hadley Historical Committee
1958

Box 82: folder 42
From New York Historical Society
1960

Box 82: folder 43
From Lawrence Terry - envelope with sketch of the house on it
1966

Box 82: folder 44
From Old Sturbridge Village
1964-66

Box 82: folder 45
Miscellaneous



Information about other museums and historical institutions
1932-62

Box 82: folder 47
Miscellaneous historical information
n.d.

Box 82: folder 48
"Historical data"
1930s

Box 82: folder 49
Bicentennial Recognition of 200 Year Dairy Farms in Massachusetts
1976

Box 82: folder 50
Address list #1
[1949-50?]

Box 82: folder 51
Mailing lists of historical societies and associations
1956

Box 82: folder 52
Mailing list ?
n.d.

Box 82: folder 53
Misc. correspondence and business
n.d.

Box 82: folder 54
Misc. Newspaper clippings re: preservation of house; JLH's AASLH award of merit
1950's

Box 82: folder 55
Antiques magazine - article mentions PPH preservation
1952

Box 82: folder 56
BOX 83 - James Lincoln Huntington



Family Genealogy and Biography Information



James Lincoln Huntington Biographical Information



"Reminisces by James L. Huntington of his Life at Forty Acres"
n.d.

Box 83: folder 1
Biography
n.d.

Box 83: folder 2a
Clippings (about him)
1936, n.d.

Box 83: folder 2b
Genealogy information
n.d.

Box 83: folder 3
Obituaries
1968

Box 83: folder 4a
Obituaries
1968

Box 83: folder 4b
"Verses by James Lincoln Huntington"
n.d.

Box 83: folder 5
Poems
1920s-30s

Box 83: folder 6
Family Genealogical Information



Concerning Barrett family
n.d.

Box 83: folder 7
Barrett family English origins
n.d.

Box 83: folder 8
Fisher family genealogy
n.d.

Box 83: folder 9
"Collis P. Huntington"
n.d.

Box 83: folder 10
"Biographical Sketches of Some Huntington Ancestors"
n.d.

Box 83: folder 11
Early Huntingtons
n.d.

Box 83: folder 12
Concerning English Huntington genealogy
1927-28

Box 83: folder 13
English documents of Huntington genealogy
n.d.

Box 83: folder 14
Concerning Huntington family/Throop family
n.d.

Box 83: folder 15
"Descendants of Dan Huntington and Elizabeth Whiting Phelps"
n.d.

Box 83: folder 16
Historical inventory notes for Huntington family reunion
1947

Box 83: folder 17
R. Thomas Huntington genealogy information
n.d.

Box 83: folder 18
R. Thomas Huntington genealogy information
n.d.

Box 83: folder 19
Metcalf family
n.d.

Box 83: folder 20
Memoir of Col. Samuel Partridge
n.d.

Box 83: folder 21
Phelps family
n.d.

Box 83: folder 22
Pitkin family
n.d.

Box 83: folder 23
Porter family
n.d.

Box 83: folder 24
Porter family genealogy by Margaret Small Gaulin
n.d.

Box 83: folder 25
"Descendants of Col. Joshua Porter"
1882

Box 83: folder 26
Sargent family notes
n.d.

Box 83: folder 27
Lincoln and Sargent families
n.d.

Box 83: folder 28
Concerning Sprague family
n.d.

Box 83: folder 29
Concerning Marianne Theresa Gellineau St. Agnan Stearns
n.d.

Box 83: folder 30
Concerning the Stearns family
n.d.

Box 83: folder 31
Throop family
n.d.

Box 83: folder 32
White/Manning families
n.d.

Box 83: folder 33
Plan of lots in Hadley cemetery
n.d.

Box 83: folder 34
James Huntington, memoir of his family ancestors - Barrett/Stearns/Gellineau/White/St. Agnan
n.d.

Box 83: folder 35
Genealogies of many families related to Porter and Phelps, including Cook, Pitkin, Root, Gaylord, Richmond
n.d.

Box 83: folder 36
"Grandmama" poem
n.d.

Box 83: folder 37
Genealogy charts and notes
n.d.

Box 83: folder 38
Miscellaneous genealogical information
n.d.

Box 83: folder 39
Odds and ends, miscellaneous
n.d.

Box 83: folder 40
Manuscripts, Motes, and Publications About House and Family



History of the Chaise House
1930-74

Box 83: folder 41
Story of the Angel of Hadley
1955

Box 83: folder 42
Short history of Forty Acres
1933

Box 83: folder 43
Charles Phelps articles by James L. Huntington
1937

Box 83: folder 44
Charles Phelps articles by James L. Huntington
1937

Box 83: folder 45
Elizabeth Porter Phelps' diary manuscripts by James L. Huntington
n.d.

Box 83: folder 46
"A Diary of Long Ago"
n.d.

Box 83: folder 47
"A Diary of Long Ago"
n.d.

Box 83: folder 48
"Elizabeth Porter's Diary of Old Hadley"
n.d.

Box 83: folder 49
Elizabeth Porter Phelps diary manuscript transcribed by James L. Huntington
n.d.

Box 83: folder 50
Elizabeth Porter Phelps diary manuscript transcribed by James L. Huntington
n.d.

Box 83: folder 51
Family Memoirs by John Phelps
1849

Box 83: folder 52
Family Memoirs by John Phelps
1849

Box 83: folder 53
"Dan and Elizabeth Huntington's 150th Wedding Anniversary"
1951

Box 83: folder 54a
"Out of the Deep" about John H. Huntington by James L. Huntington
[1940s]

Box 83: folder 54b
Forty Acres manuscript by James L. Huntington
1948-49

Box 83: folder 55
Forty Acres manuscript by James L. Huntington
1948-49

Box 83: folder 56
Forty Acres manuscript by James L. Huntington
1948-49

Box 83: folder 57
Speech about "Forty Acres" by James L. Huntington
n.d.

Box 83: folder 58
Notes on house and family
n.d.

Box 83: folder 59
Information about house and contents
n.d.

Box 83: folder 60
Index cards of early correspondence and E.T. Fisher Civil War correspondence, by James L. Huntington
n.d.

Box 83: folder 61
Incoming correspondence about family history
1930s-40s

Box 83: folder 62
Correspondence with Elizabeth Cass about house and family
1949

Box 83: folder 63
Lectures about house and family by James L. Huntington
1952-53

Box 83: folder 64
Notes for historical lecture
n.d.

Box 83: folder 65
Program in costumes with narrator by S. Stetson
n.d.

Box 83: folder 66
Clothing collection notes
n.d.

Box 83: folder 67
"Farm Museum and other data relating to Forty Acres and contents of the house"
1920s-30s

Box 83: folder 68
BOX 84 - James Lincoln Huntington (1880-1968)



Huntington Family Association



Correspondence - incoming and outgoing
1907-12

Box 84: folder 1
Huntington family reunions programs
1922+27

Box 84: folder 2
Huntington family reunion schedule of events
1927

Box 84: folder 3
Correspondence - incoming and outgoing
1920s-30s

Box 84: folder 4
Correspondence - incoming and outgoing
1920s-30s

Box 84: folder 5
"Illustration for the 6th reunion of HFA"
1937

Box 84: folder 6a
6th reunion pamphlet
1937

Box 84: folder 6b
Address list
1942

Box 84: folder 6c
Correspondence - incoming
1947

Box 84: folder 7
Seventh reunion pamphlet
1947

Box 84: folder 8a
Correspondence - incoming
1947

Box 84: folder 8b
Correspondence - incoming and outgoing
1948

Box 84: folder 9
Correspondence - incoming and outgoing and business
1948

Box 84: folder 10
Correspondence - incoming and outgoing and business
1949

Box 84: folder 11
Correspondence - incoming and outgoing and business
1949

Box 84: folder 12
Correspondence - incoming and outgoing and business
1949

Box 84: folder 13
Correspondence - incoming and outgoing and business
1950

Box 84: folder 14
Correspondence - incoming and outgoing and business
1950

Box 84: folder 15
Correspondence - incoming, concerning 150th reunion and establishment of PPH
1950

Box 84: folder 16
Correspondence - incoming and outgoing and business
1951

Box 84: folder 17a
Photographs relating to the 1951 Huntington reunion
1951

Box 84: folder 17b
Papers relating to the 1951 Huntington reunion, genealogy
1951

Box 84: folder 17c
Correspondence - incoming and outgoing and business
1952

Box 84: folder 18
Correspondence - incoming and outgoing and business
1952

Box 84: folder 19
Correspondence - incoming and outgoing and business
1953-54

Box 84: folder 20
Huntington family reunion proceedings
1957

Box 84: folder 21
Correspondence - incoming and outgoing and business
1950s

Box 84: folder 22
Correspondence - incoming and outgoing and business
1960s

Box 84: folder 23
Huntington family reunion correspondence
1965

Box 84: folder 24
Slides
1966

Box 84: folder 25
Miscellaneous
n.d.

Box 84: folder 26
Communication in regard to Miss Ada Florence Gardiner's birth


Box 84: folder 27
Misc. Family history/genealogical correspondence


Box 84: folder 28
Photograph - luncheon of the Huntington Family Assoc.
1927

Box 84: folder 29
BOX 85 - Sarah Higginson Pierce Huntington (1885-?)



Correspondence - outgoing



To Benjamin Huntington
1929

Box 85: folder 1
To Frederic Dane Huntington
1907-08

Box 85: folder 2
To James L. Huntington
1937

Box 85: folder 3
To John H. Huntington
1932-33

Box 85: folder 4
To John H. Huntington
1934

Box 85: folder 5
To John H. Huntington
1935

Box 85: folder 6
To John H. Huntington
1936-40

Box 85: folder 7
To Lilly Barrett Huntington
1916-17

Box 85: folder 8
Correspondence - incoming



About Canitoes Gift and Antique Shop
1941

Box 85: folder 9
Miscellaneous
1907-43

Box 85: folder 10
Miscellaneous



Wedding book
1911

Box 85: folder 11
Unused stationary
n.d.

Box 85: folder 12
BOX 86 - Sarah Higginson Pierce Huntington (1885-?)



Financial



Stocks
1927

Box 86: folder 1
Bills and receipts
1928

Box 86: folder 2
States Street Trust Company
1928

Box 86: folder 3
Stocks
1928

Box 86: folder 4
Stocks
1928

Box 86: folder 5
Stocks
1928

Box 86: folder 6
Stocks
1928

Box 86: folder 7
Stocks
1928

Box 86: folder 8
Stocks
1928

Box 86: folder 9
Stocks
1929-30

Box 86: folder 10
Financial
1929-31

Box 86: folder 11
Financial
1929-31

Box 86: folder 12
Financial
1929-30

Box 86: folder 13
Bank and stocks
1930

Box 86: folder 14
Ben and John's taxes
1930s

Box 86: folder 15
Ben and John's taxes
1930s

Box 86: folder 16
Legal and financial
1930s

Box 86: folder 17
Stocks
1931

Box 86: folder 18
Taxes
1931

Box 86: folder 19
Taxes
1931

Box 86: folder 20
Financial
1928-31

Box 86: folder 21
"Copies of tax reports"
1930s

Box 86: folder 22
Stock transactions
1933

Box 86: folder 23
Taxes
1934-39

Box 86: folder 24
Receipts
1937-40

Box 86: folder 25
Household receipts
1941

Box 86: folder 26
Gift shop financial and business
1941

Box 86: folder 27
Receipts
1940-42

Box 86: folder 28
Stocks
1943

Box 86: folder 29
BOX 87 - Agnes Genevieve Keefe Huntington (1904-1980s)



Correspondence - outgoing



To Catharine Huntington
1950s-60s

Box 87: folder 1
To James L. Huntington
1940s-50s

Box 87: folder 2
Note:
Miscellaneous
1952

Box 87: folder 3
Correspondence - incoming and outgoing